Xi’an Attractions

The Terracotta Army – Attracting the Crowds

On May 24, 2012, in Historical Relics, Must-sees, Terracotta Warriors, Xi'an, by Jack Li

Since the discovery of the Terracotta Warriors in 1974 close to the city of Xi’an it has been one of the main destinations for tourists all over the world and it is the main reason for people to travel to Xi’an. It’s not that the city doesn’t have other interesting sites of historical value to […]

Since the discovery of the Terracotta Warriors in 1974 close to the city of Xi’an it has been one of the main destinations for tourists all over the world and it is the main reason for people to travel to Xi’an. It’s not that the city doesn’t have other interesting sites of historical value to offer but none that can get close to the importance of the warrior and horse statues. For decades it has now been the number one place included in all Xi’an Tours. The warriors, chariots and horses had the purpose of defending the first emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, in his afterlife. Built in the 3rd century BC the army now counts as the most significant find of the 20th century and was declared a UNESCO World cultural heritage in 1987.

 

To avoid disappointment however, it’s helpful to be prepared to what to expect. It is one of the most visited historical attractions in the world and for that reason very touristy and crowded. In general in high season the place always seems to be packed with groups and individuals. To avoid ‘rush hour’ you can try to get there either early in the morning or late in the evening during the opening hours. A convenient and cheap way to get there is by public bus number 306 for as little as 7 RMB which leaves frequently from the Xi’an Railway Station north of the center. You pay for your ticket on the bus and it takes about an hour to get to the Terracotta Army. This public bus lets the passenger off at a smaller parking lot next to the main one where all the tour coaches park. The bus back to the city leaves at the same place, so remember how to get there.

 

Once you get off the bus you have to walk a little bit to get to the ticket both where you’ll be surrounded by guides offering you a tour and lots of helpful information about the place and its history. It’s up to you to decide if you think it’s worth the money and be careful, some people can get really pushy trying to convince you of their service. After you got your tickets you need to walk up to get to the actual entrance gate. Just follow the crowd or the signs, it’s hard to miss. The way leading towards it is almost built like a small village consisting of countless souvenir shops for all the visitors offering more or less the same articles. For really original souvenirs you might want to go to less visited places where you can get better souvenirs at more reasonable prices.

 

Once you’ve made your way up and have passed the gate you’ll get to the large main area with newly constructed buildings, clean and well taken care of. There are in total four separate pits and a museum in different buildings. Pit no. 1 is the biggest and most popular one with the largest number of well preserved warriors and horses. My personal advice is nevertheless to start with the second pit. It is much smaller than the first one and has a lot less warriors and horses but the building has a lower ceiling and is darker and cooler inside with lesser visitors than the biggest pit. This adds to the magic effect those ancient statues have on visitors. Don’t leave out the first pit, though. Just be prepared to people pushing you around to get a good picture close to the entrance with the warriors in the background. And apart from that, the arched hall constructed to protect the warriors seems like a hangar and takes away the ‘glamour’ or the special atmosphere which you’ll find in the smaller pits.

If you want to eat something before getting on the bus to head back to your Xi’an Hotels there are lots of food stands and smaller restaurants where you can get anything from ice cream, fruit and snacks to full meals. It’s no secret that food is overpriced and generally not very high standard at touristy places like this one. So you could consider bringing food yourself or waiting for dinner until you get back to the city. As mentioned in the beginning, the Terracotta Army is one of the most important historical sites in China, so go ahead and plan your trip, but keep in mind that you’re not the only one who has this idea.

The Ancient Culture Street in Xi’an

On May 18, 2012, in Historical Relics, Other Places of Interest, Xi'an, by Jack Li

For many people the most important reason to travel to Xi’an is the city’s culture and its long history. Because of its great importance for China’s early development the city of Xi’an has numerous interesting sites to offer which are related to different Chinese dynasties in and around the city center. On your Xi’an Tours […]

For many people the most important reason to travel to Xi’an is the city’s culture and its long history. Because of its great importance for China’s early development the city of Xi’an has numerous interesting sites to offer which are related to different Chinese dynasties in and around the city center. On your Xi’an Tours you will certainly want to see some traditional and well-known places but apart from the must sees the less crowded and less visited locations often have a very different and more original atmosphere.

 

One place in Xi’an which in not unknown among tourists but still much less frequented by many visitors than other quarters is the Ancient Culture Street, called Shuyuanmen in Chinese (meaning the gate of the Academy for Ancient Learning) or also referred to as ‘Old Street’. It got its name from the ancient Guanzhong Academy which used to be one of the four famous academies of ancient learning across the country.

It is an old and original street in Xi’an, located inside the city walls east of the South Gate of the city wall. From the Bell Tower in the middle of the city it’s not too far to walk but you can also take the bus or a cab. Depending on the direction you come from crossing the road to actually get to the arts and culture street can be a challenge because traffic can be really bad around the south gate.

 

Two archways mark the beginning and the end of the main street in this quarter which is in many ways more relaxed than all the popular places which you can find on any map and in any guidebook; this street gives you the opportunity to walk around in an area which used to be very important back in the Ming and Qing dynasties when this part of town was the cultural center of Xi’an, formerly called Chang’an. You can still find many relics from these times.

This area is great to stroll around and buy some traditional Chinese handicrafts and unique gifts. You will find jade carvings, hand-painted folding fans, painting utensils like traditional brushes and ink, bronze ware, porcelain and different artworks. Especially in the side alleys there are many smaller galleries where you can find unique pieces of art from Chinese calligraphy to contemporary oil paintings and sculptures. If you’re lucky you can watch some artists as they work on their paintings.

 

You can enjoy local food, like the delicious cold noodles or the famous dumplings, and different kinds of street food for regular prices instead of the imported and overpriced western food which you can find more or less anywhere in the touristy places. In general, I think people who go on China Tours might be a little skeptical about original Chinese food because it doesn’t have much in common with the dishes you can get in western Chinese restaurant but once you’ve tried the original flavors you’ll know why it is so famous.

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The Musical Water Fountain

On May 17, 2012, in Nightlife, Other Places of Interest, Xi'an, by Jack Li

For visitors who travel to Xi’an there are lots of cultural highlights to see during the day. If you want to go out in the evening one recommendable activity for all travelers regardless of age is the musical water fountain at Fountain Plaza at the foot of the Big Wild Goose Pagoda. The well-preserved pagoda […]

For visitors who travel to Xi’an there are lots of cultural highlights to see during the day. If you want to go out in the evening one recommendable activity for all travelers regardless of age is the musical water fountain at Fountain Plaza at the foot of the Big Wild Goose Pagoda. The well-preserved pagoda itself, built over 1300 years ago, is worth being included in your Xi’an Tours during the day (it is not open to visitors at night). It is situated in the Da Ci’en temple complex which is of great importance for Buddhists.

The most popular show is in the evening because the lights create a wonderful atmosphere against the dark night sky. The last show starts at 8:30 pm during spring time although some homepages or guidebooks indicate different times. It might be best to ask your local hotel staff for the exact time because they might change depending on the season.
In any case it is advisable to get there half an hour to one hour in advance for the evening show because with many visitors who want to see the spectacle it gets pretty crowded. From a platform north of the pagoda you get a great view over the fountain complex and for that reason those spots are particularly popular and not easy to get.

Before or after the fountain show it’s nice to walk around in the area surrounding the fountains, especially on hot days when it slowly cools down after the heat of the day. With the illuminated Big Wild Goose Pagoda in the background and the lights of the city there is a nice scenery to have dinner in this area. There is no entrance fee for the show; the plaza is open to the public and doesn’t have any entrance gates.

The show is announced by speaker in Chinese and in English, it lasts about half an hour and has great effects with the fountains in different formations with light effects to the sound of music. The music is mainly instrumental but partly includes some singing. It is a good international mixture reaching from traditional Chinese music to classical and modern pieces of music. This show is just a great way to end an exciting day with something that you don’t get to see all the time.

Especially in the evening many vendors offer to take pictures with the fountain in the background. You need to decide for yourself if you think this souvenir is worth the money, but if you decide to, bargain and don’t go with the first price the photographers offer. Since the pagoda and the fountain are located about 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) from downtown Xi’an you can either take the bus or a taxi to get there. After the show it’s pretty crowded around the plaza and not easy to get a cab so you should consider taking the bus back to your Xi’an Hotels or be prepared to wait a little while. Either way, you shouldn’t miss this ecxiting and unique show!

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Xi’an: The Muslim Quarter

On May 17, 2012, in Ethnic Group Flavors, Other Places of Interest, Xi'an, by Jack Li

To experience an ancient city at a grassroots level, then travel to Xi’an and no further than The Muslim Quarter (or Islamic Street as it is otherwise known). The Muslim community is primarily composed of the Hui people who have resided in Xi’an since the Tang dynasty. Their presence emerged in the area as a […]

To experience an ancient city at a grassroots level, then travel to Xi’an and no further than The Muslim Quarter (or Islamic Street as it is otherwise known). The Muslim community is primarily composed of the Hui people who have resided in Xi’an since the Tang dynasty.
Their presence emerged in the area as a result of the influence of Islam along the Silk Road with Xi’an being the final destination. As China’s silk trade was fundamental in its historic advancement, so Xi’an has an intrinsic place in the country’s past. This article will highlight that there is more to this region of China other than Terracotta Army and thus gives more weight towards booking Xi’an flights.

Hidden behind the city’s Drum Tower, The Muslim Quarter is an excellent place to experience a different side to Chinese culture. In particular, Islamic Street offers an array of food to tickle the taste buds. It is evident that the food has been influenced by foods from typically Muslim areas of the world and China per se, yet also having its own unique flavour. Indeed, the entire quarter has this mixed feel; the Great Mosque is evident of this combined Islamic-Chinese feel. Indeed, this fact is supported by the advent of the riveting Xi’an Halal Food Festival 2012.

It has been suggested that Marco Polo brought the idea of the pizza back the Italy after observing the Chinese pizza being made in the Muslim Quarter. This is a contentious point, as some say the Greeks invented the pizza. Nevertheless, amassed along the many stalls down Islamic Street are many tasty treats with the most common including trays of dates and nuts. Again, this is a reflection of the cross-cultural fusion. Dates, for example, are a very popular fruit in many parts of the Islamic world, however the vast amount of dates on display in the Muslim Quarter were specifically ‘jujube’ or the deep-red date which is common in China. In a similar vein, market was also showcased countless walnuts which could be seen turning slowly in a large roaster. Despite all these foods sounding delicious, the prices would hopefully mirror the tasty with dates fetching 198RMB per pound!

Islamic Street sure does have an unparalleled traditional atmosphere which is acts as a glimpse of days gone by. Take the brass statutes scattered around the main street; these are not only a fun way to take some photos, but also depict in marvellous detail scenes of life in the old city. One statute, for example, was of a little girl requesting some drink from an old vendor whilst her mother lovingly watching. Another particularly interesting feature of the quarter was the bird cages hanging along the street with cute and colourful feathered friends hopping and chirping inside. Centrally located, this corner of the ancient city of Xi’an is a stone’s throw from many of the advertised Xi’an hotels.

The Great Mosque of Xi‘an

On May 16, 2012, in Historical Relics, Other Places of Interest, Xi'an, by Jack Li

  When you travel to Xi’an, the ancient capital of China, the Great Mosque situated in the center of the city is a place you should visit in any case. This Islamic mosque is located in the Moslem quarter but it’s almost hidden and not so easy to find. It is surrounded by walls and […]

 

When you travel to Xi’an, the ancient capital of China, the Great Mosque situated in the center of the city is a place you should visit in any case. This Islamic mosque is located in the Moslem quarter but it’s almost hidden and not so easy to find. It is surrounded by walls and for that reason not visible from the distance. If you have a tour guide on your Xi’an Tours you don’t need to worry about it but if you want to look for it yourself you should either get a detailed map or ask locals in the Moslem quarter for directions; they certainly know how to get there. As for many other things it might be advisable to have the place you want to go to written in Chinese, even if you don’t understand the answer exactly you can understand a little from the gestures and you’ll at least be sent in the right direction.

It is one of the oldest, largest and best preserved mosques in China and for that reason definitely worth a trip even if you are not in general interested in the religious aspect of it. With 25 RMB the entrance fee is not at all overpriced and you really get to see an old and original part of Xi’an and a great insight into another religion which played an important role in Chinese history. Compared to all the mainly Buddhist and Taoist temples there are only few well preserved mosques which are open to the public. But just looking at the architectural style and the artfully constructed elements is already worth the visit.

The mosque’s history dates back to the Tang Dynasty; carved stone tablets which are still preserved indicate that is was set up in 742 AD. It was restored and widened in the following dynasties which made it such a large and interesting historical architectural complex. Luckily, it escaped damage during the Cultural Revolution and is today protected and supported by the government and the Communist Party with special funds for renovations. The grounds of the mosque have a rectangular shape from the east to the west and the place is divided into four courtyards which are separated by beautiful archways, pavilions and gateways, constructed in different time periods. The Worship Hall is not open to the public; it can only be entered by worshippers. For about 30,000 Muslims living in Xi’an it is a crucial part of their religious life and many attend the daily prayers.

This mosque is probably different from what you have in mind when you think about mosques in other countries. The Chinese influence in its architecture from different dynasties is clearly visible which makes the place even more interesting. If you visit the Drum Tower in Xi’an you almost automatically get to the Moslem quarter. So why would you want to miss out on the centerpiece? As a result of its location it’s not too crowded with tourists, so you can enjoy the peaceful atmosphere and relax in this historical setting. On your China Tours you will probably get the chance to see different religious sites. The aspect that most of them have in common is that they build a contrast to the area surrounding them. No matter if it’s a Buddhist temple, an Islamic mosque or Christian church; they all offer a place to escape the busy daily life for a moment.

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Tourism at the Terracotta

On May 16, 2012, in Cultural Experience, Historical Relics, Terracotta Warriors, Xi'an, by Jack Li

Mentioned in countless China travel guides and sometimes referred to as the ‘eighth wonder of the World’, the Terracotta Army (The Army) is a must-see attraction. If you have ever watched the 2008 Hollywood movie, ‘The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor’, then this is in line with what you can expect to see at […]

Mentioned in countless China travel guides and sometimes referred to as the ‘eighth wonder of the World’, the Terracotta Army (The Army) is a must-see attraction. If you have ever watched the 2008 Hollywood movie, ‘The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor’, then this is in line with what you can expect to see at The Army and all the more reason to travel to Xi’an. The exquisite representation of these periodic sculptures will captivate your imagination over China’s ancient past.

Discovered by locals in 1974 and covering over 16,000 meters squared, The Army holds great significance not only as a find, but also as an important part of China’s history. The manufacturing of the (potentially 8,000) ceramic warriors is a magnificent achievement to personify the first Emperor of unified China in the Qin Dynasty (211-206 BC). Along with the warriors, the Emperor Qin Shi Huang is supposedly protected in the afterlife by over 100 horse and 500 chariots. At first glance, warriors appear as refined pieces of art in pristine condition. Yet it is amazing the think that on discovery The Army was a cluster of piece and that it took years to reconfigure the statutes currently on view. Admittedly, to this day, not all the statutes have been found and the excavations are a work in progress. For this reason, tourists are prohibited from taking photos in the excavation areas.

Indeed, with three pits, and exhibition area and the Emperor’s Mausoleum to observe, there is little reason to be disappointed with what the museum has to offer. Take note, however, that there is a fair distance from the entrance of the museum grounds to the actual exhibition area. This stretch can be referred to as a ‘tourist trap’ considering the amount of shops selling the same items and tour guides encouraging you to sign up with their tour. Interestingly, as we figured out, the further you walk into the museum grounds, the price of the tour guides generally reduces. Also, actually in the area around the pits, be prepared to have people persistently trying to sell, typically a box of terracotta warriors, to you. Still, due to the quantity of these identical items, you will be guaranteed to get a cheap deal through haggling.

As a consequence of The Army’s monumental impact, the site was accordingly given World Cultural Heritage status by UNESCO in 1987. The museum itself is rather expensive at 150RMB, but as this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience perhaps it is worth stretching the purse strings and provides a good excuse to book China flights sooner rather than later.

 

 

 

 

The Sound of Xi’an

We all know it, there is a lot more to see in and around Xi’an than the Terracotta Warriors. I’m not saying you shouldn’t go, it’s worth a trip but hopefully not the only place you want to see when you travel to Xi’an. As an ancient capital the city has played an important role […]

We all know it, there is a lot more to see in and around Xi’an than the Terracotta Warriors. I’m not saying you shouldn’t go, it’s worth a trip but hopefully not the only place you want to see when you travel to Xi’an. As an ancient capital the city has played an important role in Chinese history and when you walk around you can still see relics from early times in many parts. One interesting place to see on your Xi’an Tours are the two towers in the center, called Bell and Drum Tower which were built over 700 years ago.

Especially the Bell Tower is hard to miss because it is located right in the middle and it marks the geographical center of the ancient capital. From the tower the four main roads towards the north, east, south and west extend, leading directly to the main gates of the City Wall. For that reason you can hardly miss it when you are in Xi’an because you can see it from all four directions coming from the main roads. The Drum Tower is situated west of the other tower, only a few minutes walking distance and easily accessible by underpass.

The entrance fee for both towers is 40 RMB including the performances which are held every hour, always at half past in the Bell Tower and at every full hour at the Drum Tower. Only around noon and in the evening there are no performances, so mornings and afternoons are best if you’d like to see them. The performances take about 10 to 15 minutes and you can use the time while you’re waiting to have a look at the exhibitions, including information on drums and their history and Chinese porcelain. You can also go up to the top on both towers for a great view, especially on the Bell Tower for its central position and from the Drum Tower you have a good view of the Muslim quarter which is located right next to it.

While the bell performance includes several traditional Chinese instruments, very detailed costumes and some dancing the drum tower performance has only the drums as instruments and less artfully decorated costumes. But the drums are somewhat more impressive because the performance is louder and more action loaded. These performances imitate the “Morning Bell and Dusk Drum” dating back to the Ming Dynasty when these where used to tell the time. Thanks to advanced technologies in drum and bell production the sound could travel several miles. To see and especially here it for yourself, don’t miss it on your China Tours!

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Following the Traces of History by Bike

On May 14, 2012, in Activities, Historical Relics, Xi'an, by Jack Li

Xi’an is the capital of Shaanxi Province and with a history of over 3,000 years one of the oldest cities in China. Apart from the world famous Terracotta Army which is a must see for many visitors going on China Tours the city has many other places of interest to offer. One site most people who […]

Xi’an is the capital of Shaanxi Province and with a history of over 3,000 years one of the oldest cities in China. Apart from the world famous Terracotta Army which is a must see for many visitors going on China Tours the city has many other places of interest to offer. One site most people who travel to Xi’an are interested in is the well known City Wall. Although the existing wall has a history of about 800 years it is the best preserved fortification from ancient times in China.

The first city wall in Xi’an, formerly called Chang’an, was built as early as 194 B. C. but the existing walls are from the Ming Dynasty. They served as a military defense system and Xi’an’s City Wall remains one of the greatest examples of fortifications of that time. The Wall is 40 feet (12 meters) tall and up to 46 feet (14 meters) wide at the top; it has four gates, one in each direction. With a length of nearly nine miles (14 kilometers) surrounding the old part of the city in a continual rectangle including numerous towers and ramparts it still marks the ancient borders of Xi’an (Chang’an).

The regular entrance fee for the City wall is 40 RMB which is a very reasonable price if you consider the historical importance of this place and you can take the opportunity to go on a bike ride around the city on top of the wall. From there you have a wonderful view on the ancient center of Xi’an inside the wall and the more modern parts on the outside of the wall. It creates a special atmosphere including both, the old and the new Xi’an. The two main roads going from north to south and from west to east meet in the center of the old part. Right in the middle the Bell Tower is located which you can see from the main gates of the wall.

A bike ride round tour takes between one and one and a half hours if you don’t take too many breaks to take pictures or to rest. Given that the wall is quite old it’s a little bumpy in some parts but that adds to the feeling of this historical place. Best times are, as with so many other activities, the early mornings and evenings to avoid the hottest part of the day during summer and those are usually the times when not too many people come for a visit. You can rent regular bikes and tandems; the cost for a regular bike is 40 RMB for about one and a half hours and the deposit is 200 RMB per bike.

You can’t just access the wall anywhere; the easiest and most popular entrance is at the south gate. Many bus lines go there so you can ask the friendly staff at your Xi’an Hotels which bus number you can take and where the closest bus stop is. Or you can take a taxi where it’s always a good advice to have someone write the place you want to go to in Chinese which you can simply show to the driver. If you ask for the approximate price before you get into the taxi you can avoid unpleasant surprises when you get off. Some taxi drivers assume that you have no idea about the regular price and charge you more than locals but in general taxis are a lot cheaper than in Western countries and it can safe time as long as you don’t get caught in traffic during rush hour.

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Big Wild Goose Pagoda

On November 18, 2011, in Historical Relics, Tours, Towers, Pagodas & Grottoes, Xi'an, by Jack Li

Xi’an has lots of Attractions to see. One of these many actions is the Big Wild Goose Pagoda. Seeing the Wild Goose Pagoda will add memories to your Xi’an tour. If you are staying in downtown Xian the Wild Goose Pagoda will only be 2.49 miles from your Xi’an Hotel. So the Pagoda is in […]

Xi’an has lots of Attractions to see. One of these many actions is the Big Wild Goose Pagoda. Seeing the Wild Goose Pagoda will add memories to your Xi’an tour. If you are staying in downtown Xian the Wild Goose Pagoda will only be 2.49 miles from your Xi’an Hotel. So the Pagoda is in a great location, you will only need to send half the day there.

Big Wild Goose Pagoda is a symbol of the old-line in Xian. This Pagoda is a holy place for Buddhists. There are three attractions to see while you are there first is the Big Wild Goose Pagoda, second is Da Ci’en Temple and lastly is the North Square. The Big Wild Goose Pagoda is very old it was built in 652 during the Tang Dynasty.  

There is a legend on how the Wild Goose Pagoda got its name. The Buddhist of the town were having a hard time finding meat to buy. One of the monks noticed a group of geese flying by he said ‘Today we have no meat. I hope the merciful Bodhisattva will give us some’. Soon after that the one of the wild goose broke its wing and fell to the ground. All the monks started to believed that Bodhisattva was blessing them, in return they needed to be more religious. At the very spot the wild goose fell they built the Pagoda and named it Wild Goose Pagoda.  

The Wild Goose Pagoda is 211.6 feet high. Its looks like a square cone, it is very simple but grand. It is made out of bricks. As you enter the Pagoda you will notice stairs that twist up. Feel free to climb these stairs. At the top of the stairs you will have a view of Xian City.

Da Ci’en Temple is the home to Big Wild Goose Pagoda. Before the temple stands a stature of Xuanzang. The story goes, once there was a man named Xuanzang he went on a long journey. He stated his journey in Chang’an ancient Xi’an where he asked the emperor if he could travel to India. He emperor granted him permission. He traveled for seventeen years. When he finally returned he brought back with him Buddha figures, 657- stras, and Buddha relics. He became the first abbot of Da Ci’en Temple. With the support from the royals he was able to get fifty hierarchs into the temple and he was also able to translate the Sanskrit into Chinese.

Before you enter the temple you will notice the Bell Tower in east and the Drum Tower in west. The Bell tower has a iron bell that weights 15 tons. You will need to be prepared to pay to get into the temple it will cost 50RMBs and it will also cost you 30RMBs to ascend the Big Wild Goose Pagoda. To get there you will need to take a tourist bus. You can choose what line you take 6, 8, or 9 make sure you get off at Big Wild Pagoda. It is open 8-5. So when you travel to Xi’an make sure you visit the Big wild Goose Pagoda.

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Hot Springs in Xian

On November 4, 2011, in Historical Relics, Nature Scenery, Xi'an, by Jack Li

As soon as your Xian flight lands make sure you put Huaqing Hot Springs on your itinerary. This place will add to your Xian tour. Emperors from all dynasties used this place for the natural hot spring each one would add something to it to make it theirs. Over the centuries a palace was formed […]

As soon as your Xian flight lands make sure you put Huaqing Hot Springs on your itinerary. This place will add to your Xian tour. Emperors from all dynasties used this place for the natural hot spring each one would add something to it to make it theirs. Over the centuries a palace was formed around the hot springs.

Huaqing Hot Spring has a famous loved story. In the Tang Dynasty Emperor Xuanzong fell in love with one of his concubines, her name was Yang Guifei. To show her that he loved her, Emperor Xuanzong would spoil Yang. He had a luxurious place built around the Hot Spring so he had a place to take her. When he was with her he neglected state business. Time went by and he still neglected state business. When he finally realized what was happening it was too late. The Lushan started a rebellion. Emperor Xuanzong had no time to take action as a result his place was destroyed and the he lost some control of his regime.

The history of the palace is 3,000 years old and the Hot Springs date backs to 6,000 years. Huaqing Hot Spring is rank as one of the hundred Famous Gardens in China. The Hot Spring coves 18.6 miles of beautiful scenery and wonderful landscapes.  

Once you enter the Huaqing hot Spring you will be greeted by two Cedars trees. As you walk along the path you will come to the Nine-Dragon Lake. The lake has lotus floating on the water and the smell is very sweet. By the lake is a statue of Yang Guifei the concubine who fell in love with the emperor. As you look in the lake you will be able to see building, trees and rocks reflection.

If you keep walking through the Dragon Boat and several pavilions you come to the site of Imperial Pool. There are five remaining pool they are Lotus Pool, Haitang Pool, Shangshi Pool, Star Pool and Prince Pool. The Emperor would wash himself in the Lotus Pool. The Concubines would use the Haitang Pool, and the Shangshi Pool was for the officials.

Huaqing Palace has amazing garden. In the garden you will be able to see Lotus Pavilion, Viewing Lake Tower, Flying Rainbow Bridge, Five Room Hall, and Flying Glows Hall. The legend says that Yang Guifei would stand and overlook the scenery while her long hair dried.  The Five room hall was built so that Empress Dowager Cixi had a place to hide from the Eight-Power Allied forces after the they captured Peking in 1900’s.

The garden also holds a mural that is composed of 90 white marbles and 30 feet long and 11 feet high. It holds the inscription “Yang Guifei Was Summoned to Serve the Emperor in huaqing Hot Spring”.  Below it is a scene that shows Emperor Xuanzong summoning Yang Guifei at a feast.

 Travel to Xian to see Huaqing Hot Springs. It will cost you 110RMBs from March to November and 80RMBS from December to February. If you want to see a performance while you are there it will cost 218-988RMBs. The Hot Spring Open at 9am and closes at 5pm. Visiting the Huaqing Hot Spring will let you feel like you are back in the Tang Dynasty.

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