The Ancient Road of Lutan

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, More Places of Interest, Temples, by Jack Li

The Ancient Road of Lutan served as a traffic artery from the ancient city site to the Tanzhe Temple. It used to be a countryside dirt road in poor condition. Because it is part of the road to the imperial mausoleum of the Qing Dynasty, the Qianlong administration financed its expansion and reparation and arranged […]

The Ancient Road of Lutan served as a traffic artery from the ancient city site to the Tanzhe Temple. It used to be a countryside dirt road in poor condition. Because it is part of the road to the imperial mausoleum of the Qing Dynasty, the Qianlong administration financed its expansion and reparation and arranged to have certain stretches paved with slates or bricks. The Ancient Road of Lutan starts from the Marco Polo Bridge and ends at the Tanzhe Temple. It is the exclusive road for the emperors when they went to the Tanzhe Temple to pray. The feudal lords, officials and common Buddhist pilgrims also take this road when going to the Tanzhe Temple.

The Tanzhe Temple

The Tanzhe Temple

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Temples, by Jack Li

The Tanzhe Temple (literally ”temple of pool and Cudrania”) is located in Mount Tanzhe in the western suburb of Beijing. It was built in AD 307, the first year of Yongjia in the Western Jin Dynasty, right after the introduction of Buddhism in Beijing. It was named the Temple of Bliss then. Because Buddhism was […]

The Tanzhe Temple (literally ”temple of pool and Cudrania”) is located in Mount Tanzhe in the western suburb of Beijing. It was built in AD 307, the first year of Yongjia in the Western Jin Dynasty, right after the introduction of Buddhism in Beijing. It was named the Temple of Bliss then. Because Buddhism was not widely accepted by people at that time, the Tanzhe Temple was relatively small in size and simple in structure. It was not until the Qing Dynasty, during the reign of of Emperor Kangxi, that the temple was renovated and enlarged. Emperor Kangxi gave the temple a new poetic name, the Xiuyun Temple (literally “the temple of cloud above the hills”), but folks rather prefered to call it the Tanzhe Temple as there was a pool in the backyard of the temple and a large amount of Cudrania trees covering Mount Tanzhe.

The Tanzhe Temple is very large in size, with a building area of 2.5 hectares, and a total area of 11.2 hectares. The layout of the temple is well-arranged and neat. Just like other ancient Chinese complex, the temple is bilateral symmetric. You can see almost the same formation on each side along the central axis. It is said that the layout of the Tanzhe Temple was so perfect that the Forbidden City adopted some of its characteristics. Now there are 943 small buildings in the temple, including halls, pavilions, towers, and houses. 638 buildings among them were built in the Ming and Qing Dynasty, representing the typical architectural style of that age.

Many famous attractions also distribute on Mount Tanzhe, such as the Tayuan Temple, the Guanyin Cave, the Longevity Hall, and the Dragon Pool. You can stop by them during your trip to the temple since they surround the temple closely. The Tanzhe Temple, together with the attractions around it, is one of the largest complexs of historical and cultural values in the suburban area of Beijing.

Apart from its magnificent architectures, the temple is enriched with natural beauty, too. The natural landscape inside and around it changes along with the season, comprising the 10 Miraculous Scenes of the Tanzhe Temple. When you visit it in spring, you can enjoy the Scene of Qianfenggongcui, literally “a world covered by verdant carpets”. In summer, you can experience the Scene of Wanheduiyun, literally “a tide of cloud” if you are lucky enough. This scene occurs before the afternoon rain of summer in Beijing. The dark cloud will suddenly appear and block out the sun, creating an impressive view before rain. In autumn, you can see the amazing scene of Pingyuanhongye, literally “a sea of red leaves”. Mount Tanzhe during that period of time is so red that it looks like it is on fire. And in winter, the Scene of JingpingXuelang, literally “ a snowy wave”, will definitely take your breath away.  Many famous painters in Chinese history were attracted by these gorgeous scenes. They visited the Tanzhe Temple often, and painted them with their skillful brushes. Some of their works have become invaluable artworks today.

The Tanzhe Temple Attractions

The Tanzhe Temple Monastery

The Two Treasures of the Tanzhe Temple

The Ancient Road of Lutan

The Tanzhe Temple Story

How was the Tanzhe Temple built?

According to the folk legend, the establishment of the Tanzhe Temple is closely related to a Buddhist senior monk named Huayan. It is said that monk Huayan was a profound and brilliant Buddhist master in the Western Jin Dynasty. He lived in the city of Youzhou, which is now part of Beijing. Many of his believers then hoped that he could have his own temple and establish his own denomination. So they raised money for Monk Huanyan to build a new temple voluntarily. However, when they raised enough funds, they found that they had no place to build the temple. To solve the problem, Monk Huayan went to visit the mayor of Youzhou, and asked him for land. He told the mayor that he had already found an ideal place for the temple, which is on the Mount Tanzhe today. The mayor thought for a while and replied, “ That piece of land is owned by landlord Jiang and Liu. I cannot make the decision for them. You have to persuade them into giving you the land“. The mayor then invited the two landlords to his place. The two landlords were very unwilling to give Monk Huayan the land he wanted, but they dared not to say it directly to the face of the mayor. So they asked Monk Huayan, “How much land do you need to build your temple?”. Monk Huayan replied, “I just want a land that is the same size to my pouf”. The two landlords were very happy to learn that he only wanted such as small piece of land, so they agreed to give him the land for free immediately. They signed a contract and sealed the deal.

Right after that, Monk Huayan smiled to the two landlords, and took out his pouf. He then threw the pouf into the air. And the most miraculous thing happened: the pouf became larger and larger. In a while, the pouf was large enough to cover several hills. The two stingy landlords were so afraid that they cried out, “No! No! That is enough!” . Monk Huayan stopped the pouf’s growing. He not only got enough land to build the temple, but also punished the two miserly landlords. With the money and the land, Monk Huayan built his own temple, the Tanzhe temple, and established his own denomination, the Huayan.

Shihua Limestone Cave Travel Tips

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Caves & Canyons, More Places of Interest, Tours, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Shihua Limestone Cave has a strong setting and a smooth bottom. Inside the cave different layers a distinct and the air is clean. Given to the buried river at the bottom of the cave, it constitutes a self-adjusting ecological system which can process 99.9% of the CO2 of the visitors. Thus the cave is valueble […]

Shihua Limestone Cave has a strong setting and a smooth bottom. Inside the cave different layers a distinct and the air is clean. Given to the buried river at the bottom of the cave, it constitutes a self-adjusting ecological system which can process 99.9% of the CO2 of the visitors. Thus the cave is valueble and suitable for geological research, scientific education and of course tourism.

Best time to visit Shihua Limestone Cave

April & May   September & October

The spring of Beijing is short but refreshing and the autumn is golden-color and pleasant. Since Beijing is a tourism city, the tourism infrastructure is complete and well-established, which offers visitors all-year-round comfortable ambiance. Visitors may call 347 to get weather report of the coming 48 hours. Even if you visit in winter, tourism agencies and hotels provide off season prices which will definitely save you a lot.

Shihua Limestone Cave tickets

70 Yuan

Half price for students and elderly

How to get to Shihua Limestone Cave

Bus

1.  Take 917 at the North Gate of Taoranting Park

2.  Take Bus 7 at Beijing Qianmen Tourist Distribution Center (April to October on weekends and holidays)

Car

1.  Beijing-Shijiazhuang Expressway — Fangshang Exit — Tuoli — Shihua Limestone Cave

2.  Beijing-Shijiazhuang Expressway — Beijing Liangxing Airport Exit — Qinglong Lake — Beicheying —Shihua Limestone Cave

Shihua Limestone Cave

On August 26, 2011, in Activities, Beijing, Caves & Canyons, More Places of Interest, by Jack Li

Shihua Limestone Cave situated at Nancheying Village, Fangshan District, 15km away from downtown Beijing. It is also known as Qianzhen Cave (meaning the place where truth is hidden) for the cave is deep and long await for further explorations. Shihua means stone flower given to various cauliflower-shaped crystal-clear stalactites. The number of the stalactites in […]

Shihua Limestone Cave situated at Nancheying Village, Fangshan District, 15km away from downtown Beijing. It is also known as Qianzhen Cave (meaning the place where truth is hidden) for the cave is deep and long await for further explorations. Shihua means stone flower given to various cauliflower-shaped crystal-clear stalactites. The number of the stalactites in the cave is the largest in China and it is an important site for geological research and scientific education. The cave is one of the most famous limestone caves in China besides Reed Flute Cave in Guilin, Jade Cave in Fujian and Yaolin Cave in Hangzhou. It is a 4-A scenic spot considered one of the best limestone caves in China and was awarded “the best solution cavity in China” in 2005. The Cave falls into seven layers with the top four open to the public.The bottom layer is an underground river several meters below the earth’s surface. 10 000 to 50 000 years old moon milks, pure white formations in the shape of a lotus, are prominent within the first and second layers. Shihua Limestone Cave is also known for the thinnest and largest stone shields in China. The largest shield is 1.2m high with a diameter of 2.6m. The thinnest shield is only seven millimeters thick. 

Shihua Limestone Cave Story:

1.  Shihua Limestone Cave

It is said that a large amount a treasures were buried on the foot of the beautiful DaFangShan southwest of Beijing. For all the time local people widely circulate a saying that the treasure is hidden somewhere beneath the mountain. So where exactly is the mysterious treasure? The folk story holds it that it was around the village of Nanche Camp. There were many stone mountains in the Nanche Camp area where neither trees nor grass could grow due to the lack of soil, let alone crops. Facing this difficult situation, the villagers were still unwilling to leave their homes. Poverty made them gather together to discuss what to do to solve the problem of supporting their families and to study the way of saving the entire village. Days and Nights had passed, but they still couldn’t come up with a single idea. Finally, someone suggested that all villagers move to a better place where people could settle down and survive. However this suggestion was not favored by most villagers because almost everyone believed that there must be some reason for their ancestors to choose to live in Nanche Camp village, the problem was that they were unable to figure out their forefathers’ intention, so they were stuck here. There were also someone thought that maybe somewhere in this poverty-stricken area buried some treasures which so far hadn’t been discovered. These words arouse great response among the villagers, and they all decided to find out the treasure, hoping to bring forever good to their beloved homes. And they were willing to appoint the one who found the treasure as their village leader. They began their searching action at once. All villagers took whatever tools they had and went from east mountain to west mountain, from north hill to south hill, in fact the searching area covered almost every single inch of the land that belonged to the village, but nothing was found, nothing! When they met in the evening, as they agreed at the previous meeting, only one man did not show up. People waited and waited and pinned all their hope on the man. What happened to him? It turned out that this man looked for the treasure place carefully for a whole day without eating or drinking, and when he came to the foot of the north hill (where the current Shihua Limestone locates), he heard a faint pattering sound of something dropping from a high place downwards. Then he saw a thin swallet where the sound came from. He ran near to the rock excitedly when he again heard a dulcet sound, he stopped and found out the sound was caused by several coins falling down to the bottom of the swallet. He put these money into his pocket and memorized the place where the coins coming out, then he went back joyfully to tell his county-fellows the great news. On hearing this, all villagers were as happy as a lark because they did not need to move to another place any longer. So all of them went after the man with bright fire torches, but unfortunately when they arrived at the site, the swallet was gone. The man was anxious to know the reason, and so were the villagers. They all began to look for the swallet. After three days, there was still no sign of it. On the third day there was a sound saying “Stop looking for the treasure place, there is no using continuing like this because I have closed my coffer. All of you are brave to protect your home, so you already have the treasure in your hearts!” After that ages have passed, the god was finally touched by the generations of these hard-working villagers and granted them the Shihua Limestone Cave as the special treasure place for them!

Ming Dynasty Tombs Travel Tips

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Tombs, Tours, by Jack Li

Located in the foot of the Tianshou Mountain, the Ming Dynasty Tombs are mausoleums of the Ming emperors. The Tianshou Mountain belongs to the Yanshan Mount Chains in Changping District, northwest of Beijing. The first tomb is the Changling Tomb built from the 7th year (1409) during the Yongle Era while the last one is […]

Located in the foot of the Tianshou Mountain, the Ming Dynasty Tombs are mausoleums of the Ming emperors. The Tianshou Mountain belongs to the Yanshan Mount Chains in Changping District, northwest of Beijing. The first tomb is the Changling Tomb built from the 7th year (1409) during the Yongle Era while the last one is for the Emperor Chongzhen. In 230 years of the Ming Dynasty, there were thirteen tombs for emperors, seven for imperial concubines, and one for an eunuch. Thirteen emperors, twenty-three empresses, two princes, more than thirty imperial concubines and an eunuch were buried in these tombs.

Best Time to Visit Ming Dynasty Tombs

Spring and autumn in Beijing are perfect seasons to travel. It is neither too cold nor too hot. In autumn, there are clear skies, crisp air and colorful leaves making Beijing the Golden city. The north edge of the Great Plain of China is surrounded by the hills on one side and waters on the other which creates a typical semi-humid continental climate for Beijing with four distinct seasons. The annual average temperature is 11.8℃with the coldest being -4.6℃ in January and the hottest being 26.1℃ in July. Springs and autumns in Beijing are quite short while winters are relatively long. The average amount of precipitation is 644 mm, with 180 frostless days. Heating systems in Beijing are quite good, so it’s warm indoor in winters. However it’s rather cold outside, and tourists have to wear sweaters and thick coats. Weather forecasts are broadcasted in newspapers, radios and on TV. You can also check the weather by calling 859 which provides Chinese and English weather reports for the day and the next day. Most people go to Beijing to visit historical cites which are not affected by weather. If you arrive in winter, you will get off-season rates in hotels and travel agencies which can save you plenty of money.

Ming Dynasty Tombs Tickets

Shenlu Road: Out of season: 15 yuan, in season: 20 yuan

Dingling Tomb: Out of season: 50 yuan, in season: 70 yuan

Changling Tomb: Out of season: 30 yuan, in season: 45 yuan

How to get to Ming Dynasty Tombs

Public Transportation

1、 Take the subway of line thirteen and get off at the Lishuiqiao stop. Then take the bus Changping 22 or 23 to the Shenlu Road to the Dingling Tomb and the Zhaoling Tomb.

2、 Take the bus 919 or 345 express at the Deshengmen stop and transfer to the bus 314 at the Changping Dongguan stop to the Dingling Tomb and the Zhaoling Tomb.

3、 Take the subway of line Changping at the Xi’erqi stop and transfer to the bus 21 at the Nanshao stop. Then take the bus 314 at the Changping Dongguan stop to the Dingling Tomb and the Zhaoling Tomb.

By Car:

Drive along the Badaling Express and get out at the exit of Changping Xiguan after paying 15 yuan. Go straight to the national road 110 after passing the Changping Xiguan roundabout. After 34 kilometres of the national road 110, turn right into the Shisanling Road. Drive about 200 meters, then there is the sign for the Ming Dynasty Tombs on the right.

There are apple orchards on the two sides of the road. Go along the road to get to Shenlu Road. Go over the T shaped crossing,  and the Dingling Tomb, the Changling Tomb and other tombs are there. The ring road around the lake by the Ming tombs reservoir is on the right hand side.Enter the ring road around the lake and drive about 4.7 kilometers, then turn left at the entrance of the Bangshan Park. Go straight and you can get to the Ming tombs reservoir.

Zhaoling Tomb (Zhaoling)

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Tombs, by Jack Li

Zhaoling Tomb is located in the east of Dayu Mountain and is the tomb of the twelfth Emperor Muzong and his three wives. Zhaoling is the largest repaired tomb and also one of the officially open tombs. Zhaoling Tomb’s building area is 35 thousand square kilometers. The Ling’en Gate, Ling’en Palace and the East and […]

Zhaoling Tomb is located in the east of Dayu Mountain and is the tomb of the twelfth Emperor Muzong and his three wives. Zhaoling is the largest repaired tomb and also one of the officially open tombs.

Zhaoling Tomb’s building area is 35 thousand square kilometers. The Ling’en Gate, Ling’en Palace and the East and west Palace are well preserved. Also Fang City, Bright Building and Bao Roof are in good condition. The twelfth Emperor Muzong and his three wives were buried here. Emperor Muzong (1537-1572), was an average emperor among the 16 emperors in the Ming Dynasty. He didn’t care about government affairs when he was in power. Although he didn’t care about it, he didn’t object to suggestions from ministers. The Longqing negotiated peace in 1571, from then on the national between Han and Mongolian didn’t fight for more than 20 years. Turtle tombstone is Emperor Muzong’s tomb with no words, maybe because of it is hard to say whether he was a successful emperor or not. Tourists that went there always touch the turtle tombstone for there is a legend: touch the head of the turtle and you will not have to worry about your whole life and touch the buttock of the turtle and you will never be ill.

After the fall of the Ming Dynasty, Zhaoling Tomb was destroyed twice. In 1644 AD, the Bright Building was burned. On March 5th, 1696 AD, it rained heavily and Ling’en Palace and Wupei Palaces were burned by thunder strikes. Many people tried to put out the fire, the two Wupei Palaces were unharmed but the Ling’en Palace burnt down. As the years passed, the two Wupei Palace and Ling’en Gate were destroyed. From 1785 to 1787, Qing government repaired the Ming Dynasty Tombs to release the national conflicts. Zhaoling was included. From the analysis of the relics, just the Bright Building, Ling’en Gate and Ling’en Palace were repaired. At this time the tomb was rebuilt, although the system of the tomb was more complete, the original building regulations were changed.

Ming Dynasty Tombs (Shisan Ling)

Changling Tomb (Changling)

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Tombs, by Jack Li

Located in the southern foot of the main peak of Tianshou Mountain, Changling Tomb is the mausoleum for the Emperor Yongle Zhudi the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and his empress Xushi. The Changling Tomb is the largest and earliest tomb to be built during the Ming Dynasty. As the most important tourist […]

Located in the southern foot of the main peak of Tianshou Mountain, Changling Tomb is the mausoleum for the Emperor Yongle Zhudi the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and his empress Xushi. The Changling Tomb is the largest and earliest tomb to be built during the Ming Dynasty. As the most important tourist attraction, its surface structures are well preserved.

Architectures of the Changling Tomb cover an area of 120,000 square meters, with a layout of square at the front and round at the back. The square part is made up of three courtyards. There is a Ling En Gate in the second courtyard. ‘Ling En’ was granted by the emperor Zhu Houcong on the 17th year of the Jiajing Era (1538). In Chinese, Ling means blessing and En means great kindness. Under the gate is a stage with white marble railings. There are three stairs at the back and front of the stage which have exquisite engravings of sea horses galloping underneath and vigorous dragons chasing fire on the upper side. On the left and right of Ling En Gate are two side doors. They are decorated by sets of yellow and green coloured glass which look bright and vivid compared to the red walls. Ling En Palace stands spaciously in the north of the courtyard. It was the palace for enshrining and worshiping memorial tablets of former emperors and empresses as well as offering sacrifices to gods and ancestors.

Ming Dynasty Tombs (Shisan Ling)

Yongling Tomb (Yongling)

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Tombs, by Jack Li

Yongling Tomb is located in the south of Yangcui Mountain. It is a large tomb where the eleventh Emperor Jiajing and his three wives were buried. Yongling Tomb was built in the fifteenth year that Emperor Shizong was in power. But he selected the tomb place after his wife Chen died. At that time, Emperor […]

Yongling Tomb is located in the south of Yangcui Mountain. It is a large tomb where the eleventh Emperor Jiajing and his three wives were buried.

Yongling Tomb was built in the fifteenth year that Emperor Shizong was in power. But he selected the tomb place after his wife Chen died. At that time, Emperor Shizong commanded his ministers of Zhangcong and Yongqing Luo to select a tomb place for his wife Chen and meanwhile he also selected a tomb place for himself.

Yongqing Luo is known for his talent of divination and geomancy. When he came to Tianshou Mountain, he observed the shape and terrain of the mountain and selected two lucky places for the tombs of Xiangzi Ridge and Eighteen Ridge. Later, Emperor Shizong inspected the two places and finally he decided to build tombs at Eighteen Ridge. What’s more, Emperor Shizong thought Eighteen Ridge was not a good name, so he changed it to Yangcui Ridge. The big project began on April 22nd 1636. Emperor Shizong held the opening ceremony by himself and ordered ministers of Guoxun and Lishi to be responsible for the project. The repair work of the other seven tombs and the project of Changling stones Protection began on the same day.

Forty thousands people participated in this project at that time and some other projects like new palace and Shengji Pavilion were under construction. Therefore the cost every month was more than fifteen million grams of silver. But the Ministry of Works in Ming Dynasty didn’t have enough money, so Emperor Shizong adopted suggestions from ministers to collect taxes from people to support the tomb project.

Ming Dynasty Tombs (Shisan Ling)

Xianling Tomb

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Tombs, by Jack Li

Located in the foot of the west peak of Tianshou Mountain, the Changling Tomb is the mausoleum for the Emperor Renzong Zhu Gaozhi. He was the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). His empress Zhangshi was also buried there. The Changling Tomb was built after the emperor’s death. The Emperor Renzong was only in […]

Located in the foot of the west peak of Tianshou Mountain, the Changling Tomb is the mausoleum for the Emperor Renzong Zhu Gaozhi. He was the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). His empress Zhangshi was also buried there. The Changling Tomb was built after the emperor’s death. The Emperor Renzong was only in the power for eleven months.  He left his will, saying that he had not made many devotions to the people and the country because time was so short. He would rather have a simple funeral and a plain tomb. He didn’t want to waste much money or manpower. His son Zhu Zhanqi, later named the Emperor Xuanzong, followed his will and started to build the tomb in the 1st year (1425) during the Hongxi Era. It only took three months for the construction to be accomplished.

Since it was built, the Xianling Tomb has been kept simple and plain compared with other tombs. There was not a single Statue or pavilion. Afterwards a pavilion was built during the Jiajing Era (1522-1566). The Shendao Road meaning holy and sacred is one kilometer long, with a stone bridge that has one low simple arch. The pavement was tiled just with bricks. Gravel is spread on the sides of the road, so water can flow when it rains. The location of the architectural buildings is south but is 20 degrees to the west. It covers an area of 42,000 kilometers. There are five halls in total and three gate buildings. These gate buildings are not as magnificent as those of the Changling Tomb. These architectural buildings were not built for luxurious enjoyments. Therefore there was a saying about it that ‘the Xianling Tomb is the simplest of the Ming Dynasty Tombs while the Jingling Tomb is the smallest’. The Xianling Tomb set a good example for other tombs in the Ming Dynasty.

Ming Dynasty Tombs (Shisan Ling)

Dingling Tomb

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Tombs, by Jack Li

The underground palace of the Dingling Tomb belonged to Emperor Zhuxianjun, the thirteenth emperor of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). It is also the tomb of two empresses. Located under the foot of Dayu Mountain, to the southwest of the Changling Tomb, the Dingling Tomb was built between 1584 and 1590 which is the12th year to the […]

The underground palace of the Dingling Tomb belonged to Emperor Zhuxianjun, the thirteenth emperor of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). It is also the tomb of two empresses. Located under the foot of Dayu Mountain, to the southwest of the Changling Tomb, the Dingling Tomb was built between 1584 and 1590 which is the12th year to the 18th year during the Wanli Era. There are architectural buildings like Ling En Gate, Bao City, Ming Building, and the underground palace. It is the only tomb among the thirteen Ming tombs which has been excavated and can be visited by tourists.

The general layout on the ground of the Dingling Tomb is round at the front and square at the back. It was designed under the ancient Chinese philosophical concept ‘the sky is round and the ground is square’. The Dingling tomb started to be built in the 12th year (1584) during the Wanli Era when the Emperor Wanli was still alive. The project took ten years and cost 400, 000 kilograms of silver, which is how ancient Chinese people paid for things. It was done by 1620 when the emperor was 28 year old. The tomb was not used for thirty years. The Dingling Tomb is one of the three largest tombs. It has three courtyards at the front and one big Bao City at the back. Right in front of the gate of the tomb is a white marble stone bridge. Across the bridge is a tall stele pavilion, where 300 rooms like offices and stations are built. Then there is the fence wall called Wailuo City on the edge of the tomb. A Chinese ancient book about tombs of emperors describes the Wailuo City as superb workmanship.

Ming Dynasty Tombs (Shisan Ling)

Page 5 of 71234567