Dealing with Culture Shock in China: Part 1

China travel adventures can seem to many as an exotic cultural mix of opposites to what they are used to at home. From all the new varieties of food to the unusual language and the hustle and bustle of the big cities, there is a range of new experiences to conjure up thoughts of excitement […]

China travel adventures can seem to many as an exotic cultural mix of opposites to what they are used to at home. From all the new varieties of food to the unusual language and the hustle and bustle of the big cities, there is a range of new experiences to conjure up thoughts of excitement and adventure. However many first time visitors are unaware of the culture shock they will face when their China flight touches down at the airport.

This post will discuss a few factors to be aware of before you arrive, so things don’t come as such a surprise when you exit the airport feeling jet lagged and nervous.

 

One of the first things, and something that is impossible not to notice or find difficult to adjust to (unless you already know Mandarin) is the language. Signs, sounds and everyday objects which were once commonplace become replaced by complex looking characters, hard to decipher sounds and items you can’t tell the function or contents of.

An essential item for making this easier is a Mandarin Phrasebook. Ensure you have one that displays words in both Pinyin and Chinese characters and it will make adjusting to China much easier.

 

Another factor to consider is the local food. Chinese food is far different from the dishes available in western countries which have been adapted to suit the western palette. There is a huge choice available and it varies dependant on the cuisine or province the food originates from. For example Sichuan food tends to use a lot of spice and chilli, whereas Beijing food tends to feature noodles and heavy buns due to the harsh climate in winter.

Although in the large cities there is western food available, it is often ‘Chinese Western’ and not fully authentic. Many staple ingredients back home are difficult to source and overpriced out in China especially Cheese, Wine and Steak. Breakfast is far different as well and often consists of savoury rice porridge and dumplings or something similar.

Often different parts of meat are used which can be difficult to get used to, and it helps to know the Chinese view chicken breasts as the most ‘tasteless’ part of the meat so it is less often used. Chicken feet on the other hand are a delicacy and found in many different varieties, including dried, fried and boiled!

 

Once you have got your head around the new cuisine choices, there is the method of eating it! Generally unless you are in a tourist frequented restaurant or a Western place there will not be a knife and fork available. Your utensils of choice will be chopsticks and occasionally a spoon! Chopsticks aren’t too tricky to use after a few tries, and you gain a sense of satisfaction from finishing a meal using them (it also impresses the Chinese locals).

If the thought of this terrifies you, your China Hotel may well have western restaurants or buffets which will provide cutlery. In addition street food and fast food outlets such as KFC, Mcdonalds and Pizza Hut are everywhere if you wish to avoid utensils completely!

 

 

Veggie Heaven in Beijing!

On September 26, 2011, in Beijing, Restaurants, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

When considering China as a potential holiday destination, it is often confusing for those with specific dietary requirements to understand what food options will be available for them once they arrive. If you plan to travel to Beijing this article will hopefully give you a bit more information on Vegetarian and Vegan options. There are […]

When considering China as a potential holiday destination, it is often confusing for those with specific dietary requirements to understand what food options will be available for them once they arrive. If you plan to travel to Beijing this article will hopefully give you a bit more information on Vegetarian and Vegan options. There are a decent amount of restaurants available within the city and most Beijing hotels, alongside fast food and western restaurants will also have guaranteed meat free dishes on the menu for Vegetarians.

 

For a larger selection you could head to a pure Vegetarian restaurant. There are a variety of such places available and you will find a high concentration in the area surrounding the Lama Temple. It is not unusual for monks and tourists to dine in these places at the same time which makes for an interesting experience.

 

A popular place and well worth a visit is ‘Xu Xiang Zhai‘. This restaurant is nearby the Lama Temple and directly opposite Conficus Temple, with the nearest subway being Yonghegong on line 5. The establishment offers a buffet starting at 5.30pm, and a large menu which is available all day. It is quite a serene atmosphere, upon walking in you feel as though you are entering a spa complete with fish swimming around in pools. It is one of the most reasonably priced Vegetarian restaurants with the buffet costing around £6, which includes drinks and desserts. This consists of Chinese and Western dishes alongside some unusual and interesting creations.

 

Those with a larger budget may consider ‘Pure Lotus Vegetarian‘. This restaurant has two locations in the Chaoyang district and has fairly western prices, with a meal costing between £12 and £20 per head. Similarly to Xu Xiang Zhai it offers Vegetarian dishes alongside mock meat imitations, including Veggie versions of Peking Duck, Kung Pao Chicken and Kobe Beef. Other purely Vegetarian restaurants worth a look are Lotus in Moonlight, Tianchu Miaoxiang, Fairy Su and Beijing Vegan Hut.

 

In addition to the specific Vegetarian places, many Chinese dishes such as stir fries, noodles and hot pots have Vegetarian varieties, and tofu is a popular ingredient replacing meat in many dishes. The only issue to be aware of is sometimes these dishes may be cooked in animal fat, seasoned with fish sauce or accompanied with meat toppings so it is best to bring a phrase book or download an English to Chinese dictionary application on your phone so you can effectively communicate with the waitress.

 

Some key phrases to learn before your trip which will come in very useful are:

I dont eat meat - Wǒ bùchī ròu

I am vegetarian – Wǒ sù shí zhě

I am Vegan -Wǒ chún sù shí zhě

Do you have Vegetarian food? – Yǒuméiyǒu sù shí zhě

I am on a special diet – Wǒ zài jiéshí

I am allergic to (insert food) - Wǒ duì (insert food) guòmǐn

Could you make a meal without (insert food)? – Néngbùnéng zuòyīge bùfang (insert food) de cài?

fish – yú

eggs - jīdàn

poultry - jiāqín

red meat – niúyángròu

gluten - miànjīn

seafood – hǎixiān

shellfish – bèiké

peanuts – huāshēng

meat – ròu

pork – zhūròu

beef – niúròu

(note these phrases can be incomprehensible or mean something else entirely if pronounced incorrectly, so it may be worth downloading an application for your mobile phone with an Audio component to become familiar with the pronunciation.)

 

Another possible option to consider would be sampling the varieties of street food in Beijing, as there are many vegetarian snacks and meals, including baked sweet potatoes, savoury pancakes, fresh fruit and grilled vegetables on sticks. Additionally it may be worth heading for a large supermarket like Carrefour or Wal Mart if you have self catering facilities, as they have a large selection of both western and Chinese foods to create meals from. These are some of the bigger hypermarkets but there are plenty of small to medium supermarkets and stores located near most Beijing Hotels.

 

National Museum of China

On September 23, 2011, in Activities, Beijing, Cultural Experience, Museums, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Located on the east side of Tian’anmen Square in downtown Beijing, the National Museum of China was founded in February 2003 after merging with the former National Museum of Chinese History and the National Museum of Chinese Revolution. History and art are two factors emphasized in the collections and is also a terrific place for […]

Located on the east side of Tian’anmen Square in downtown Beijing, the National Museum of China was founded in February 2003 after merging with the former National Museum of Chinese History and the National Museum of Chinese Revolution. History and art are two factors emphasized in the collections and is also a terrific place for school trips and as a tourist attraction.

The predecessor of the National Museum of Chinese History is the Preparatory Office of the National Museum of History which was founded on July 9th, 1912. It was renamed the Beijing Museum of History after October 1st, 1949 when People’s Republic of China was founded. After a decade, it was renamed the National Museum of Chinese History. The predecessor of the National Museum of Chinese Revolution was the Preparatory Office of the National Museum of Revolution founded in March, 1950 and renamed ten years later.

In August, 1959, the new buildings on the east side of the Tian’anmen Square were constructed. The museum was regarded one of the “Top Ten Great Constructions” for celebrating the 10th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. The two museums opened to the public on that October 1st .The aims of the National Museum of China are to protect Chinese cultural heritage, display a long-standing history, provide education on history and culture to the public, especially for the younger generation and promote cultural exchange and communication with other countries and regions. It is not also a museum and a perfect place for further study of culture, history and art.

After the expansion of 2010, the National Museum of China became the largest museum in the world with an area of 191,900 square meters. There are over 1 million collections in 49 galleries. Ancient China and The Road of Rejuvenation are two permanent exhibitions with over a dozen showrooms each. The Museum of Chinese History covers the collections from 1.7 million years ago to the end of the Qing Dynasty. The National Museum of China contains over 620,385 cultural items in its permanent art collection, and the museum displays many precious and rare Chinese historical artifacts that are not found in other museums.

The Most Important Collections

1. Houmuwu square cauldron (ding)

Houmuwu square cauldron (ding) was cast over 3,000 years ago and weighing 832.84 kilograms. It the largest Shang ritual bronze vessel found to date and the heaviest ancient bronze item in the world.

2. Square vessel (fang zun) with four rams

Being the biggest existing square zun, square vessel with four rams was made in Late Shang (1300–1046 BC) with a height of 58.3cm. It is a perfect fusion of moulding and artistic design representing the best bronze-making traditional technique.

How to get tickets

The museum is at No. 16, Chang’an Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing. Its opening times are 9:00 to 17:00 Tuesday to Sunday. Tickets are issued until 15:30 and last admission is at 16:00. You can get a free ticket from the Ticket Office at the West Gate by showing your valid ID (passport). Group visitors (more than 20 people) have to book the free tickets seven days before by calling 010-65116400 and get them at the North Gate Ticket Office with a certificate letter of the unit.

A Short First Timers Guide to Trains in China

On September 20, 2011, in China Travel Gossip, Tips & Ideas, Travel Info, by Jack Li

During your China travel adventure, You may consider venturing out on the train for an interesting cultural experience, a day trip to somewhere new or simply as a method of transport from point A to B. Less hassle than catching a flight or taking a bus, the trains in China cover most of the important […]

During your China travel adventure, You may consider venturing out on the train for an interesting cultural experience, a day trip to somewhere new or simply as a method of transport from point A to B. Less hassle than catching a flight or taking a bus, the trains in China cover most of the important tourist destinations alongside local areas so you can travel to Xian, Shanghai, Guilin, Tibet, Guangzhou and more depending on your itinerary.

 

Train Categories in China

Trains in China have multiple categories, distinguished by a letter (this precedes a number which corresponds to the route). ‘K’ and ‘T’ are the oldest and therefore slowest train types, with the middle category being the ‘Z’ train. Trains starting with a  ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘G’ are the newest and fastest trains, usually with the highest prices, although this is worthwhile if you are short of time and far from the price you would pay for the same distance in a western country.

 

Seat and Sleeper Classes in China

There are a variety of seat and sleeper classes on Chinese trains, however some are restricted to certain trains, for example long distance or popular routes. The types available are: Soft Sleeper, Hard Sleeper, Soft Seat, Hard Seat and the less often seen Deluxe Sleeper.

Soft sleeper is a 4 bed compartment with a lockable door, car attendant and occasionally, TV screens and power supplies. This is the most popular category for western tourists and nicely fits a family of four. The two lower bunks convert into sofa’s for daytime use. Hard sleeper is an open plan 6 bed partition and has no lockable door. These berths are popular with the backpacker crowd and travellers with a lower budget.

Soft and hard seats are similar to those on western trains, soft is slightly larger and more padded being equivalent to first class back home, whilst second class are cheaper and adequate, like standard train seats in Europe and America.

Deluxe sleepers are usually found on long distance overnight trains and consist of a private 2 bed compartment with private bathroom area. Travellers use these less often, as they are usually equivalent to the cost of a flight and generally occupied by government employees.

Train facilities

All except the oldest ‘K’ and ‘T’ trains are fully air conditioned and generally have both western and squat toilets available. Toilet paper is very rarely supplied so be prepared to bring your own supply for the journey. Smoking is only permitted outside of sleeping compartments and aisles, however the newer model trains have a non-smoking rule.

All long distance trains and those running a popular route have restaurants on board. They are housed in a restaurant car and those heading to or from major tourist orientated towns and cities will likely have an English menu. There are snacks, drinks and hot meals available. In addition to this there are usually hot water dispensers situated throughout the train should you wish to make your own hot drinks, soup or pot noodles.

 

Booking and Purchasing Tickets

You can purchase tickets prior to your arrival in China or through an agent, this is a stress free easier method especially if you don’t have a very flexible itinerary, however there will be an added fee for the convenience.

It is simple enough to book tickets yourself and large cities generally have an English speaking booth available. Tickets for the popular high speed trains usually come on sale up to 20 days before departure however the older and less used trains often leave it until 5 to 10 days before. It is recommended to take your passport as for certain routes and trains it needs to be presented in order for you to book a ticket. Another point to be aware of is you are only able to book a journey departing from the station you are at, so you cannot book a journey from Beijing to Xian if you are at Shanghai Central Station.

A recommended website for train travel throughout China (and other cities) with all other vital information including photographs is Seat 61. You can also book many train journeys within China online at China Travel Depot.

 

Make A Splash at the Water Cube!

On September 13, 2011, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Modern Architecture, by Jack Li

Beijing National Aquatics Centre, more commonly known as ‘The Water Cube’, is one of the famous constructions created for the 2008 Olympics in Beijing’s Olympic Park. It is a popular attractions for tourists who travel to Beijing and is easy to get to from all Beijing hotels. It cost over 10 billion yuan to build […]

Beijing National Aquatics Centre, more commonly known as ‘The Water Cube’, is one of the famous constructions created for the 2008 Olympics in Beijing’s Olympic Park. It is a popular attractions for tourists who travel to Beijing and is easy to get to from all Beijing hotels. It cost over 10 billion yuan to build and was designed to host the swimming, diving and synchronized swimming events during which 25 world records were broken.

If you just want to take a look around, head there in the evening as the Water Cube is lit up a vibrant neon blue and takes some great photos. Nearby the Olympic Torch and Bird’s Nest Stadium are also very brightly lit and photogenic. You may also find yourselves the target of some photographic attention as it is a popular spot for out of towners who may not have seen many westerners before. This can range from shy attempts to photograph you to a request for you to pose in front of the landmark with their child or whole family!

The area is simple enough to get to via the Subway and the less often used Line 8 will take you right to the grounds. You can alight at either Olympic Park or Olympic Centre as they are either side. Be wary if you are there in the late evening that once the lights go off at 10pm, the last subway is usually just over 20 minutes after this. However if you do find that you’ve missed it then a taxi to the city centre will usually be around 40RMB (insist on the meter), although finding one may be difficult.

On August 8th, 2010, marking the two year anniversary of the Olympics, the Water Cube was reopened as a water park known as ‘Happy Magic’. Entry prices are steep for Beijing, costing 200RMB for adults and 160RMB for children, but it may be worth the fee to experience the largest water park in Asia, complete with 60 lifeguards! If you can’t justify the price tag, you can also pay 50RMB to just go for a swim in the Olympic pools.

The water park is open from 10am until 9.30pm and is a colourful wonderland complete with vibrant slides, plastic jellyfish and surreal decoration. Should you not have suitable swimming attire with you in China, the park has swimwear, towels, goggles and rafts all available for purchase. Lockers cost 100RMB to rent, although 80RMB is refunded when you return.

The park features a spa, wave pool and lazy river alongside thirteen water rides including the Speed Slide, Bullet Bowl and Tornado. A day trip here would be an interesting contrast to the city and a great way to cool down if you are visiting during the hot and humid summer. There is plenty to do for adults and children alike and you can finish off at one of the water themed restaurants in the cube itself.

If you find yourself strapped for time, the water cube is only a small detour from the city on the way to or from the airport, so why not stop by before or after catching your Beijing flight!

Tiananmen Square

On September 2, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Must-sees, by Jack Li

Tiananmen Square was built in the 15th year of Yong Le period in Ming dynasty (1368—1644).  Serving as the main entrance of the Forbidden City, it was initially named “Chengtian Square”.  “Chengtian” meant the emperor was appointed to govern the nation by Heaven. However, at that time, it was just a three—storey wooden pailou (traditional […]

Tiananmen Square was built in the 15th year of Yong Le period in Ming dynasty (1368—1644).  Serving as the main entrance of the Forbidden City, it was initially named “Chengtian Square”.  “Chengtian” meant the emperor was appointed to govern the nation by Heaven. However, at that time, it was just a three—storey wooden pailou (traditional Chinese-style gate), not as magnificent as at present.  After being destroyed by the Big Fire in 1451, the square was rebuilt in 1465. However, the turbulent period of wars during the Ming dynasty caused the Square be reconstructed again. In the eighth year of Shun Zhi period in Ming dynasty (1368—1644), its name was changed to Tiananmen Square.

The 33.7m high building was erected on a white marble diamond block. A red 10m platform was set on the block. Each of the platform’s brick weights 43kg.  To show the emperor‘s supreme power, five rooms were built in the western part of the gate tower (stretching to its eastern side) and nine rooms from south to north. The numbers nine and five symbolized the emperor in ancient China.  Tiananmen Square’s designer is Kuai Xiang; he was called “Lu Ban Kuai” at that time.

During the late years of the Qing dynasty, Tiananmen Square was devastated by the feudalist rule and the eight-power allied forces. However, on 1st October 1949, Tiananmen Square gained on a new image as Chairman Mao announced the world that the People’s Republic of China had been founded.  After that day, Tiananmen Square has been seen as the Holy Land in the eyes of the tens of thousands of Chinese. Today, Tiananmen Square has become the symbol of China; it was designed into Chinese national emblem. Because of its 500—year history from ancient to modern civilizations, Tiananmen Square remains an internationally recognized spot.

Tiananmen Square travel tips

Yonghegong Lama Temple

On August 31, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Must-sees, Temples, by Jack Li

Yonghegong Lama Temple is on the northeast corner of the City of Beijing. It used to be a eunuch supervisor residence. In the 33rd year of Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty (1694), the Emperor ordered the construction of an imperial residence here and granted it to his fourth son, Yin Zhen (later Emperor Yongzheng). In […]

Yonghegong Lama Temple is on the northeast corner of the City of Beijing. It used to be a eunuch supervisor residence. In the 33rd year of Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty (1694), the Emperor ordered the construction of an imperial residence here and granted it to his fourth son, Yin Zhen (later Emperor Yongzheng). In the third year of Yongzheng it became the temporary palace and its name was changed into Yonghegong. In 1735, Yongzheng passed away and his coffin was kept here for a short time; for this reason the temple’s green glazed roofs was revised into yellow ones (yellow is the colour exclusive to the Chinese emperors). Because Emperor Qianlong was born in the temple, the temple was considered a blessed place and was renovated to be of the same size as the Forbidden City with yellow roofs and red walls. In the ninth year of Qianlong (1744), Yonghegong was revised into a Lama Temple for Tibetan Buddhism. In 1983, the State Council of China listed it as one of the key Buddhist temples in the Han region of China. Yonghegong Lama Temple is a Buddhist temple of the highest scale throughout the country.

The temple is mainly composed of three delicate memorial arches and five magnificent halls, with a total area of 66,400 square metres of thousands of halls and rooms. It consists of Tianwang Hall, Daxiong Hall, Yongyou Hall, Falun Hall and Wanfuge Hall; apart from this, it also contains the East and West Side Halls, the Four Lecture Halls(the Scripture Hall, the Vajrayana Hall, the Mathematics Hall and the Medicine Lord Hall). From the south to the north, the sizes of the courtyards taper and those of the temples increase, so the layout of the temple is one of layers of courtyards with the major halls hidden deep inside, which is an aggregation of the architectural characteristics of the Han, Manchu, Mongolian and Tibetan nationalities. In the southern courtyard of the Temple there are three tall decorated archways, one huge wall carved with murals and a couple of stone lions. Walking past the archways you will come to a shaded path paved with quarry bricks, called Niandao (the Carriage Road). To the north is the main gate to the Temple, Zhaotao Gate, inside of which two Bell-drum Towers stand on each side, and outside there lies the richly decorated corridor. Beside one of the towers there is an impressive eight-ton bronze pot used for cooking Laba porridge (a traditional dish eaten on the 8th of the 12th lunar month) in the old days. Continuing to the north you will come to the Eight-angled Tablet Pavilion where the tablet recording the history of the temple is kept. The scripture on the tablet is written in Han, Tibetan, Mongolian and Manchu languages.

Yonghegong Lama Temple Attractions:

Yonghegong Main Hall

Yongyou Hall

Falun Hall

Wanfuge Hall

Yonghegong Lama Temple Stories:

1. Elimination of the Ghosts

In the Lama Temple two performances are respectively held on the 30th day of the 1st month and on the 1st day of the 2nd month of the lunar calendar. In the first one is called Yangui (the performance of the ghosts) and the second one Dagui (the elimination of the ghosts). The ghosts refer to those powerful anti-Buddhist aristocrats and pagans, and the performances are demonstrations to intimidate the heretics. So the actors put on furious and frightening looks in order to drive away or subjugate the evil spirits.

2. Dongshu Yard

Every Chinese emperor after Emperor Qianlong had to come to the Lama Temple at least three times a year to pay their respect to the Buddha. On the day of birth (August 25th) and the day of death (January 1st) of Qianlong, the emperors must visit the temple in rich and solemn attire and pay their respects to their ancestor; and on the Summer Solstice of May the emperors also came to the Temple to worship the Buddha and then retire to Dongshu Yard to eat noodle made of new wheat with sesame source. Dongshu Yard served as the main resting place for the emperors. According to the historical record, the then Dongshu Yard was as grand as the present Lama Temple, and the two distinct complexes composed the entire site. The Dongshu Yard had been a replica of the Imperial Palace in many ways such as its decoration, contents and layout; some officials and generals used to work here and one of their major jobs was to look after the huge collection of treasures and antiques stored there. In 1900, Dongshu Yard was looted and burnt down by the Japanese army. The splendour of the place has become past history.

3. The Luohan Dish of the Lama Temple

The Luohan Dish of the Lama Temple is related to a Buddhist festival¡ªWeisai Festival, meaning the Day of the Full Moon. To the Buddhists this is a day of great importance because it is bound with the birth, the enlightenment and the Nirvana of Sakyamuni. In May, 1990, the then chairman of the Chinese Buddhism Association proposed to make the day of the full moon in April of the lunar calendar the memorial day of the Buddha for all the Han Buddhist temples. On that day, the monks living in the Lama Temple will light up one hundred crisp oil lamps one by one and put flowers and flower casts made by crisp oil and Zanba (a kind of food made of barley flour) around them. At noon a big lunch will be held for all that comes to the temple, including monks and worldly people. This lunch is called Luohan Dish and is made up of vegetables only. According to the Buddhist doctrines, all Buddhists should stick to vegetables as a demonstration of the quality of Buddhist mercy and benevolence as well as an important part of daily Buddhist practice. Vegetables are symbols of simplicity and purity, and are believed to be conducive to a heart of mercy and benevolence. The name, Luohan Dish, comes from the Eighteen Arhats who, under the instruction of Sakyamuni, would never achieve nirvana so as to stay in this world and spread Buddhist doctrines to the people. Usually, to make Luohan Dish, monks of all the temples carefully select eighteen kinds of vegetables in honour of the Eighteen Arhats.

Wuling Mountain Travel Tips

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Mountain Areas, Other Regions, Tours, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Wuling Mountain nature reserve pays attention to forest ecosystem protection and wildlife protection. The visiting zone is in the protection area and experiment area. Visitors can go for sightseeing, do the scientific research and activities at the designated place. Except the designed places, people are not allowed to go enter the other places of the […]

Wuling Mountain nature reserve pays attention to forest ecosystem protection and wildlife protection. The visiting zone is in the protection area and experiment area. Visitors can go for sightseeing, do the scientific research and activities at the designated place. Except the designed places, people are not allowed to go enter the other places of the protection area. There are some little animal, you should keep yourself safe when you are hiking, taking pictures and picking fruits. The Wuling Mountain has large temperature difference. It is foggy, rainy and strong ultraviolet radiation in summer. Please bring necessary warm clothes, umbrella and sunscreen.

Best Time to visit Wuling Mountain

The best season to visit Wuling Mountain is from 15th, April to 15th, October. 1st, October to 31st, May of next year is the period strictly control the wildfire. The Wuling Mountain is a quiet and cool place, but from May to July is busy season for tourism and it will be many people there.

Wuling Mountain Best Routes

Enter from the front gate:

One day tour: front gate – Five Dragon Heads Scenic Spot (see the sunrise and the clouds) – Qingling Ridge (Five Dragon Heads, Longjiao Pine, Dubi Pine, Yuntian Gate, Bubi Stone, Dieshi Rock and so on) – Longtan Scenic Spot (Longtan Waterfall, natural white birch forest, Thumb Peak, Budduism Songzi Cliff, Hukou Waterfall, Golden eagle cliff, Wuling stones and natural Kiwifruit Garden) – Lotus Pond lunch – Fairy Tower Scenic Spot (see the fairy tower, see the eighteen pond ecological line by walking, visit the Tiandi Pond, Yu Pond, New Moon Pond, Jing Pond and Huan Pond) – return.

Two days tour: front gate – Lotus Pond lunch – Longtan Pond Scenic Spot (Longtan Waterfall, natural white birch forest, Thumb Peak, Budduism Songzi Cliff, Hukou Waterfall, Golden eagle cliff, Wuling stones and natural Kiwifruit Garden) – live in the Lotus Hotel at night – visit the Five Dragon Heads in the moring(see the sunrise and clouds) — Qingling Ridge (Five Dragon Heads, Longjiao Pine, Dubi Pine, Yuntian Gate, Bubi Stone, Dieshi Rock and so on) – the Lotue Pond breakfast — Fairy Tower Scenic Spot (see the fairy tower, see the eighteen pond ecological line by walking, visit the Tiandi Pond, Yu Pond, New Moon Pond, Jing Pond and Huan Pond) – return.

Enter from the north gate:

One day tour: the north gate – the Cool Boundary Scenic Spot (the Cool Boundry Monument, the Cool Boundary Peak, Sanxiang Stone, the old Liaoyang and so on) – to the top peak by bus from Luosong Tai – visit the Five Dragon Heads Scenic Spot — Qingling Ridge (Five Dragon Heads, Longjiao Pine, Dubi Pine, Yuntian Gate, Bubi Stone, Dieshi Rock and so on) – the Lotus Pond lunch — Longtan Pond Scenic Spot (Longtan Waterfall, natural white birch forest, Thumb Peak, Budduism Songzi Cliff, Hukou Waterfall, Golden eagle cliff, Wuling stones and natural Kiwifruit Garden) – return.

Wuling Mountain Tickets:

Entrance ticket: 90RMB/person, in addition 1 yuan for personal insurance

Note:

1. 60-70 years old people have 50% discount with ID card

2. Children under 1.2 meters, 70 years old and older people with ID card and disabled soldier in revolution with disabled soldier card free of charge.

3. Group tickets: 70RMB/person

4. Driving: small car is 60RMB, Jinbei car is 86 RMB. The cars has more than 19 sites is 100 RMB. You can drive from the north gate and the south gate.

How to Get to Wuling Mountain:

By train:

Beijing: (Jingcheng travel line N211/212, Jingdan 2215/2252, Jingcheng 7153/7154) and get off at Xinglong train station.

Tianjin: (Jincheng 4412/4414) and get off at Xinglong train station.

Shijia Zhuang: (Jingcheng 4453/4454) and get off at Xinglong train station

Chengde: (Xingcheng 7183/7184) and get to the Xinglong train station.

By bus:

Arrive at the front gate of Wuling Mountain: you can take the special line from Beijing Sihui Coah Station to Wuling Mountain.

You also can take No.980 bus from Dongzhimen Coach Station and then rent a car with others, 20RMB/person and four people a car.

By bus in the Scenic spot:

You can take a bus with others and visit the whole scenic spot or just take a car for part of your journey. There are bus stops in Zhonggu Yard, Fairy Tower, Lotus Pond and Longtan Pond. The bus leave on time, the route is Zhonggu Yard – Fairy Tower – Lotue Pond, top peak – Longtan Pond, visitors can choice the best agenda for his/herself according the time of the bus.

Fairy Tower Scenic Spot

The Immotal Tower scenic spot got the name due to the fairy tower’s altitude and the shape. The tower is 48 meters high and looks like a fairy. The vertical distribution of forest vegetation is obviously. The boundaries and the four seasons are clear. The Fairy Tower is in a valley which is 1400 meters […]

The Immotal Tower scenic spot got the name due to the fairy tower’s altitude and the shape. The tower is 48 meters high and looks like a fairy. The vertical distribution of forest vegetation is obviously. The boundaries and the four seasons are clear. The Fairy Tower is in a valley which is 1400 meters high and it is developed from a natural rock. Many natural cracks in the wall of the rock formed different sizes of stones. The Fairy Tower is one of the huge stones. It is stand alone and clouds around it make people feel a fairy. Standing in the Yiran Pavilion you will see the whole beautiful scenery. Here the green grass, mountains and clear water, also the flying waterfall around you. You will see three springs, six ponds and more than 50 scenic spot include the Fragrant Spring, Qiankun Waterfall, Bayin Waterfall and Yu waterfall and so on. Crossing mountains and walking through the forests you will experience the nature and enjoy the cool summer. This is a scenic resort for ecological tourism, relax and ecological education.

Wuling Mountain (Wuling Shan)

 

 

Five Dragon Heads Scenic Spot

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Mountain Areas, Valleys and Scenic Spots, by Jack Li

The Five Dragon Heads got the name from the five stones in the southeastern of the main peak. The main peak is 2118 meters high and it is the highest peak of the Yan Mountain. If you arrive at the peak you will see five ridges extend to different directions and the five ridges means […]

The Five Dragon Heads got the name from the five stones in the southeastern of the main peak. The main peak is 2118 meters high and it is the highest peak of the Yan Mountain.

If you arrive at the peak you will see five ridges extend to different directions and the five ridges means the successful and failure in their whole life of the emperor of Qingdongling Tomb. Standing in the main peak you will see the Miyun Reservoir, the Simatai Great Wall and Jinshanling Great Wall. The most beautiful scenery is sunrise. The dawn is dazzling and the first sunlight rises from here.

Wuling Mountain (Wulingshan)

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