Free Tour Award of Chinatraveldepot – Beijing Hutongs and 798 Art Zone Tour

On January 23, 2013, in Beijing, China Attractions, China Travel Gossip, Temples, by Sandy Li

This quarter’s Beijing Free Tour contest has just finished. The lucky winner, out of over one thousand candidates, can choose his company, and visit 798 ArtZone, Hutong, and DrumTower, along with the HouhaiLake. All expenses are borne by Chinatraveldepot. By convention, this tour shall berecorded by a professional photographer, appointed by China Travel Depot. We […]

This quarter’s Beijing Free Tour contest has just finished. The lucky winner, out of over one thousand candidates, can choose his company, and visit 798 ArtZone, Hutong, and DrumTower, along with the HouhaiLake. All expenses are borne by Chinatraveldepot. By convention, this tour shall berecorded by a professional photographer, appointed by China Travel Depot. We would like to help them preserve this uncommon experience, and share it with others. On Nov. 31st, the contest was brought to a closure and we had our lucky guy, Fida Rehman. Mr. Rehman and his friend would benefit from this wonderful Beijing tour.

On the morning of January 12th, 2013, Rehman and his friend started the tour by visiting our first stop, 798ArtZone. 798ArtZone, located in the northeast of centralBeijing, is always compared with Greenwich Village and SOHO inNew York. History and reality, industry and the arts perfectly fit here. Also known as 798ArtDistrict, it is a new rising, avant-garde and trendy space that hosts high-level cultural, artistic and commercial activities. Rehman and his friend had a good time appreciating mottled red-brick wall, scattered orderly industrial plants, crisscross pipelines, slogans of different ages on the wall.

At noon they came to a hutong around Houhai. They were highly impressed by the traditional Chinese architecture and the pace of life in hutongs. People here are much more leisure than those onBeijing’s broad modern avenues, and the neighbourhood here is quiet and relaxing. The narrowness of the alleyways and of many courtyard homes discourages heavy traffic but encourages residents to live their lives on the street, fostering a strong sense of community. It is common to see the residents playing cards, Chinese chess, Mahjong, or simply chatting with each other. The hutongs are like village within the megalopolis. As wandering among, they were surprised as though stepped into the past. There they had their lunch, and were not disappointed by the Chinese cuisine.

Visitors who have interest may experience Rickshaw Drive through the zigzag Hutongs near Houhai Lake. Once in ancient China, people took rickshaws like taxis.  Sitting on it you could have a rest, but still having a pleasant view of the beautiful scenery.

Before we called it a day, they also dropped by theDrumTower. It was built in 1420, on a 4-meter high base and is over 46-meter high. Not far from it, there standsBellTower. The twin towers together worked to tell people the time in the past days. Rehman said he was devastated by the size of the drum. No one could imagine how ancient people can make such a huge drum, and installed it. About 600 years passed, the drum is still safe and sound, telling time every single day.

In the end of the day, Rehman and his friend expressed their sincere gratitude to us. They had a wonderful day, getting a better understanding with Beijing local culture. We also hope more and more people can have a chance to join us on your China tours.Beijingwelcomes you!

Beijing starts a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries

According to Beijing municipal authorities, Beijing will start a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries from January 1, 2013. International travelers enjoy 72 hours transit visa policy based on the requirements of the Ministry of Public Security, in arriving at the Beijing Capital Airport, shall comply with the following conditions: 1) in line […]

According to Beijing municipal authorities, Beijing will start a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries from January 1, 2013.

International travelers enjoy 72 hours transit visa policy based on the requirements of the Ministry of Public Security, in arriving at the Beijing Capital Airport, shall comply with the following conditions:

1) in line with the scope of the citizens of the country, including:

— European Schengen visa agreement countries (24), Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia , Spain, Sweden, Switzerland

Other European countries (7) Russia, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Romania, Ukraine

— American States (6) United States, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile

Oceania countries (2), Australia, New Zealand

Asian countries (6) South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Brunei, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar;

2)  holding valid international travel documents to prove their nationality;

3)  in line with the conditions of entry to the country or region;

4)  held by the exit from the Beijing Capital International Airport way ticket to a third country or region, or prove within 72 hours to determine the date and seat;

5) equipped with the entry and exit of airlines reporting to the border authorities.

Beijing border audited in line with the transit visa-free conditions, will be handled in accordance with the provisions of the transit procedures.

____________________________

For more information on travel to Beijing with visa free, contact us at: info@chinatraveldepot.com, or visit http://www.chinatraveldepot.com/website/beijing-transit-tour/#?utm_source=CTD&utm_medium=home&utm_campaign=72hours

 

Hidden

On June 27, 2012, in Beijing, Cool Places, Nightlife, by Jack Li

Those of you who do not know where the Hidden Lounge is and how to find it are not alone.  As its name implies, the Hidden Lounge is sneakily tucked away inside the CBD International Apartment complex in the Shuangjing District.  Open the door under a dimly lit sign, and walk down the stairs into […]

Those of you who do not know where the Hidden Lounge is and how to find it are not alone.  As its name implies, the Hidden Lounge is sneakily tucked away inside the CBD International Apartment complex in the Shuangjing District.  Open the door under a dimly lit sign, and walk down the stairs into another world.  It’s a mellow/chic bar and lounge that offers a delicious selection of cocktails and hookah.  It’s been weeks since I got off my China flights, and I’ve only just found it myself.  The bar is littered with cushions, couches, and curtains that make you feel right at home.  The atmosphere is relaxed, and the background music is an eclectic mix of dance music, jazz, and Latin music that speaks to my soul.  In addition, it’s the only place I’ve found in China that serves salty popcorn that isn’t coated inside and out with sugar.  It’s one of the best lounges to stop by in when you travel to Beijing.

Hidden is a great place to unwind after a long day.  After a nine hour work day and two hours of Chinese Lessons a little nagging voice tells me to pass out.  The angel on my shoulder tells me I need to contact friends and family back home, and work on my own projects, and his counterpart tells me I should go out with friends and blow off some steam.  Hidden lets me do all three.  The wifi allows me to be semi-productive (I did some work on a startup I help run, while some of my friends worked on their Chinese homework), the relaxing atmosphere lets me relax with my friends, and the absurdly comfortable seating lets me take a load off.  Hidden is the kind of bar where you can have your cake and eat it too.

A huge part of the environment is the owner, originally hailing from Orlando Florida.  He’s been in Beijing for the past eight years, has lots of great stories and advice for travelers.  With his help I finally know where to find Mexican food in Beijing, something I’ve craved since I first arrived.  Just remember to leave him a tip, a habit that has been beaten out of me here in China.  No matter how great it is to travel, it’s always nice to have a little bit of home, and I promise you that he won’t find it rude.  When you travel to Beijing, make a stop at Hidden.

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KTV True Life

On June 26, 2012, in China Attractions, Cool Places, Nightlife, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Back in the States I’ve always been a big fan on karaoke, and this past semester I was graced without Wednesday classes so every Tuesday night my friends and I would go to karaoke at our local haunt.  When I decided to travel to Beijing I was delighted to find that karaoke is extremely popular […]

Back in the States I’ve always been a big fan on karaoke, and this past semester I was graced without Wednesday classes so every Tuesday night my friends and I would go to karaoke at our local haunt.  When I decided to travel to Beijing I was delighted to find that karaoke is extremely popular here.  The first thing I did after I got off my Beijing flights after I unpacked my apartment was to check out some local Karaoke.

A bar with karaoke in The US is usually set up like an open-mic night, with a stage where anyone can sign up to sing in front of the entire bar.  This is a lot of fun, but has two major drawbacks: you have to sing in front of strangers, and strangers have to sing in front of you.  Sometimes this is great and leads to new friends and seeing amazing talent.  More often however, it’s like being forced to watch a string of rejects from American Idol.

Conversely, in China karaoke is a very intimate experience.  With KTV (Karaoke Television) you rent out private rooms for you and your friends that can range for a small room for 6-12 people, to a massive two story hall.  You are given a few microphones, and a computer terminal to the side of the room controls what songs are played.  There is a huge selection of popular Western and Eastern music to choose from.  The songs play in whatever order you choose on the screen.  In my experience everyone who wants to sing crowds around the microphones, and they are passed from person to person.  You’re all singing to each other rather than singing to an audience.

KTV is a great way to spend an evening, and to see a different approach to an international trend.  When I go to KTV I get to sing my heart out with my friends just like I would back home, but with a Chinese twist.  Karaoke is much more mainstream and popular here than it is back home where I usually found myself dragging my friends to the bar and pushing them on stage.  In China, karaoke is a small and intimate experience where everyone gets excited and  everyone participates.  As part of your China travel check out a KTV venue near you, and if you’re staying for a long time like I am invite your Chinese friends!  Nothing brings people together quite like drinks, songs, and laughter.

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Insert Michael Bay Pun Here

On June 21, 2012, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Entertainment, by Jack Li

There is a lot of advice on this blog, but if you are going to just do one thing when you travel to Beijing you need to see the Beijing Acrobats.  Need to.  You should be required to see it by law.  In all reality you should see the Great Wall and countless other things […]

There is a lot of advice on this blog, but if you are going to just do one thing when you travel to Beijing you need to see the Beijing Acrobats.  Need to.  You should be required to see it by law.  In all reality you should see the Great Wall and countless other things in Beijing, but seriously see the acrobats.  They will blow your mind and when you think that your mind is thoroughly blown they will put it back together only to blow it a second time to the point where the first mind blowing seems like nothing more than a whistle in the wind.  Seriously.  Book your Beijing Flights to come see the acrobats.  I’ll wait.  Okay ready?  Let’s get into it.

I saw the acrobats last night, and I’m still absurdly excited about it.  Now coming up to the show all of my friends who had already seen it would make outlandish statements about it, but the most popular was always “the Beijing Acrobats put Cirque du Soleil to shame.”  Now I love Cirque du Soleil and have seen it in many of its different iterations on different parts of the globe.  I found these claims hard to believe, smiled politely, and said “we’ll see.”  And I saw.  Oh I saw.

The show started with standard acrobatic tricks, impressive handstands, juggling, feats of strength, and the same sorts of things that are “normal” at an acrobatics show.  The performers were extremely talented, but I sat in my seat smiling smugly.  Yes, the show was enjoyable, but in my head I was already coming up with ways that Cirque du Soleil was better.  The production value wasn’t the same, the soundtrack wasn’t from a live orchestra, my mind was flowing with pretentious little ways that my slice of the West was better than what they had here.

The show continued, and got more and more impressive.  Once I saw an acrobat climb down a stair on one hand, while another acrobat stood on his back with one hand I started to reconsider.  The production value was not as extravagant here, but the pure physical ability and stunts performed were definitely more impressive.  I was starting to be proven wrong, but could still find ways justify my opinions.  With the finale, that  all changed.

For the final act a huge spherical metal cage was brought to center stage and a performer drove out in a motorcycle.  He then proceeded to enter the cage, and drive around in circles.  Then upside down.  Driving upside down.  My mind was blown.  The Beijing acrobats had won.  As soon as this thought crossed my mind, another driver came by and entered the cage.  Now there were two motorcycles  driving in tandem, upside down.  My mind was reassembled for the sole purpose of reblowing it.  Then a third motorcyclist came out.  Then a fourth drove out.  And when it didn’t even seem like there was room, a fifth joined.  Five motorcycles were driving around with feet between them, and I don’t even have words to describe my emotions at the time.  Just then 3 MORE DRIVERS came out and joined the cage.  I’d say my mind was blown, but honestly, I’m sure at this point my mind had left town for better weather.  When you travel to Beijing see the acrobats, you won’t be sorry.

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The Silk Market Strikes Back

On June 18, 2012, in Beijing, Shopping, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

This past Saturday my fellow interns and I gathered together our wallets, poker faces, and headed over to the silk market as a much anticipated part of our China travel, .  We returned with lighter wallets, and lots of swag.  Here are some more tips for buying anything at the Silk Market when you travel to Beijing: Get […]

This past Saturday my fellow interns and I gathered together our wallets, poker faces, and headed over to the silk market as a much anticipated part of our China travel, .  We returned with lighter wallets, and lots of swag.  Here are some more tips for buying anything at the Silk Market when you travel to Beijing:

Get used to saying No

If you aren’t saying no much more than you say yes, then you’re doing it wrong.  Most vendors’ first price will be in the stratosphere (Someone tried to sell me a t-shirt for 500 RMB, see you there) and they will try to get the highest price out of you that you are willing to pay.  Don’t even consider the early prices, give a firm “NO” and tell them much lower price that you would like to say.  Stay firm with your price, and don’t feel the need to raise your number every time they lower theirs.  One of my friends fell into this trap, she spent too much time thinking about offered prices, and she let her price gradually rise.  Give the vendors an inch and they will take a mile, they’re very good and what they do.  When the vendor gets into range of my price, however, I’ll usually try to meet them halfway.  This relentless stubbornness, coupled with a little giving at the end has worked well for me.

Use a strong team

If possible, travel to the markets with someone who is as willing to negotiate as hard as you are.  My friend and I acted as a team for anything item that either of us wanted to purchase.  Since I was not invested in his purchases, and he was not invested in mine, we were always able to save the other from a bad deal and get a better price.  Don’t underestimate the power of teamwork.  That being said, the vendors will try to appeal to everyone in your group, be it children, parents, significant others, or insignificant others to buy their wares.  Be sure that everyone is on the same page before you begin to bargain.

You’ll get better deals late at night

As it gets later and later vendors just want to unload their stuff.  Bargaining takes less time and vendors are more willing to accept your price than they are earlier in the day.  The two caveats to keep in mind are that some of the stalls close before the rest close at 9PM, and you will be one of the few customers still in the market, so everyone’s attention will be directed at you.

Everyone has the same stuff

With the exception of only a few stalls that sell unique handmade goods, most of the vendors are selling basically the same thing.  Don’t get attached to any stall or owner, if the two of you can’t agree on a price walk away.  You might get a better price and if not who cares, you can try your hand at bargaining for the same thing at the next stall.  Also – If any of the vendors are rude to you (one of them said my friend was ugly and no one would remember him) then don’t buy anything from them, move on to the next one.  There are too many nice people there trying to make a living to worry yourself with the bad eggs.

 

The Silk Market is a great stop to make on your Beijing Tours.  Good luck, happy bargaining.

How to Succeed in Haggling without really trying

On June 15, 2012, in Beijing, China Attractions, China Travel Gossip, Shopping, by Jack Li

So you can buy Ray Ban’s for 40 RMB (about $6 US) ?[EDIT: I ended up buying them for 20RMB]  Count me in.  This weekend I’m going on a trip to the Silk Market, a world renowned Chinese market where you can buy everything from custom suits, to silk robes, to cell phones.  I recommend you […]

So you can buy Ray Ban’s for 40 RMB (about $6 US) ?[EDIT: I ended up buying them for 20RMB]  Count me in.  This weekend I’m going on a trip to the Silk Market, a world renowned Chinese market where you can buy everything from custom suits, to silk robes, to cell phones.  I recommend you make the trip as well when you travel to Beijing.  Everything can be bargained on which can be intimidating to Westerners who are used to set prices.  I learned how to haggle the hard way in Mexico, but once you get know how you can get anything under the sun for a great price.  I’ll be filling you all in on how my trip goes, but in preparation for me and to help you out with your China travel, let’s go over some haggling basics.

Don’t accept the first or second or third price.  Maybe not even the fourth.  The vendors are very experienced at bargaining, especially with foreigners, and even if an early price sounds good, it isn’t, and there is more money to save.  Don’t think in terms of your local currency, as goods are much cheaper here and anything made in China does not have the shipping costs included in Chinese goods in the West.  Think about what is a good price in China, not what is a good price back home.  Also, keep in mind that vendors will add something to the initial price for foreigners.  Don’t take this to heart though; the vendors are just trying to sell their goods at whatever they think the item is worth to you.  Do your best to keep that number low.

Start with a lower offer then you are willing to pay.  The vendor will start high, and you should start low.  You two can meet in the middle at a price that’s acceptable to the both of you.  Be patient as this will take time.  Have an idea of the maximum price you’re willing to pay for something, and don’t let yourself go over it.  Try not to get attached to any one item, the odds are someone else will have the same thing.

Turn my (Beijing) Swag on!

Don’t be afraid to walk away.  If a vendor sees you leaving and they can offer you a better price, they probably will.  Even if they don’t, another vendor will see that you’re serious about bargaining and willing to walk away, and may give you a better price.

Remember to have fun, and that the two of you are playing a game.  If they offer an absurdly high price, don’t be afraid to start with an absurdly low price and a smile.  Don’t feel bad if they say they aren’t making a profit off of you.  If they can make a sale at a profit they will, and if they can’t make a profit they won’t.  Anything they say is part of the game, you’ll be able to tell what’s true by what they do.  When you travel to Beijing Silk Market or any other market in China, keep calm and haggle on.

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Contents May be Hot

On June 14, 2012, in Restaurants & Food, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Like many a weary traveler I was exhausted after the final leg of all of my China flights.  Once I landed I had to travel to Beijing, which was a traffic laden journey.  When I finally arrived in my apartment after a full day of traveling, I desperately wanted some water.  I could neither speak […]

Like many a weary traveler I was exhausted after the final leg of all of my China flights.  Once I landed I had to travel to Beijing, which was a traffic laden journey.  When I finally arrived in my apartment after a full day of traveling, I desperately wanted some water.  I could neither speak nor read any Chinese at the time, but the water filter had two levers.  I tried the first, and it was hot water.  My tragically Western sensibilities led me to assume that the other lever was cold, and boy was I wrong.  The other level was actually ungodly hot, and I still have the burn on my hand to prove it.  Over the course of my time here I’ve realized that there is almost no cold non-bottled water in Beijing.

Water options in the office

You can have water at any temperature as long as it's hot

This may seem trivial, but think about how much we drink cold water in the West, be it at restaurants, from water fountains, or directly from the faucet.  After a bit of research and asking around, I’ve come up with what I believe to be the main reasons for the plethora of hot water here in China:

Health/Digestion Concerns:

Hot water is generally accepted as being good for you, helping with digestion, helping to break down oil in your system, and being better for you than cold water since hot water is closer to your body’s temperature.  While a cursory Google search disproved most of these statements, there is nothing wrong with hot water either, so who cares.

Water Quality:

In China the tap water is not drinkable, and some theorize that the taste for hot water was developed in response to the need to boil water before drinking it.  This may or may not be true, but the story has a nice ring to it.

Caution: Contents May Be Hot (Coffee Cup #20), 2003 Fred Lynch

Caution: Contents May Be Hot (Coffee Cup #20), 2003 Fred Lynch

Tea/Noodles:

Since hot water is readily available, it is very easy to make tea or instant noodles wherever you are.  Instant noodles are much more than a dorm room staple here, and can be found at every convenience store in China.  Back in the US it was always an ordeal to heat water for tea, whereas here I can make it on the fly.

Be careful what you drink in your China travel, because if like me you are used to cold water you will be greeted with a big surprise.  Take it in stride, get used to the smaller portions and drinking your hot water slowly.  In less than a week I’ve been cured of my tendencies to down massive quantities of water due to necessity, and have grown to accept hot water instead of cold.  Give it a try, embrace the conveniences it brings, and ignore the rest.  Live how they do on the other side of the world, and you’ll end up with a better understanding of yourself.

A Traveler’s guide to the Beijing Subway

On June 13, 2012, in Beijing, Getting Around, Travel Info, by Jack Li

When I made my plans to travel to Beijing I was delighted to hear about the subway system.  Having rode subways from the Boston T to England’s Underground I thought my transition to the Beijing subway would be seemless.  Boy was I wrong.  Learn from my mistakes, and your China Travel will be much easier […]

When I made my plans to travel to Beijing I was delighted to hear about the subway system.  Having rode subways from the Boston T to England’s Underground I thought my transition to the Beijing subway would be seemless.  Boy was I wrong.  Learn from my mistakes, and your China Travel will be much easier than my first few days here.

The most empty I have ever seen Line 10

A very empty Line 10

The first thing two things I noticed when descending into the subway was how clean it was, despite the massive crowds.  Even the Metro in Washington DC does not compare to how clean the subways are in Beijing.  There is no graffiti, no dirt on the floor, no old gum, or any indication that the subway is used just as much as it is.  Coming from New York this was a quite a shock.

After admiring the cleanliness, it’s time to get on.  If you have any bags with you you’ll need to put them through an x-ray machine and then it’s time to board.  Each trip on the subway costs 2 RMB (a little more than a quarter $US).  To buy a refillable card you’ll need to put down a small deposit, but it is much easier than continually buying one way tickets which only work from the station you bought them from.  The ticket kiosks have an English option (tapping the touch screens with a card is more effective than using your fingers), and the workers in the booths are very friendly.  You’ll need to tap your card to enter the subway (like with a SmartLink Card on the NJ Path or an Oyster Card on the UK Underground) and again when you exit.  Be careful not to get on the airport express unless that’s where you’re heading, as that line costs 25 RMB.

Once you’re in the station you need to find your subway line.  All of the lines have arrows on the ground for where the train doors will open (some even have sliding glass doors).  The accepted practice is to wait on the sides, and let people exit from the middle of the door.  The subways are crowded (Even by New York Standards!)  If you’re traveling during rush hour be prepared to pack into the cars like a can of sardines.  If you’re here on vacation try to avoid the trains during this time.  Keep in mind that generally the Chinese workday goes until around 6PM.

Subway Map for Beijing

If you don't have a map feel free to print out this one!

All signs and station announcements are in both English and Chinese, so you should be able to find where you need to go.  Even so, a pocketsize map of the subways is worth its weight in gold, especially if you need to make multiple transfers.  With a few transfers you can move between any line in the city, which is a welcome change from the subways in New York which have left many a traveler stranded on the wrong side of Central Park.  Keep in mind that a lot of people will be getting on and off at transfer stations.

As your stop approaches work your way towards the door.  If, like me, you’re traveling with people of the, ahem, shorter variety (sorry Janna/Clair) be sure that they can weave through the sea of people with you and don’t get left behind on the train.  Also keep in mind which exit you need for your destination (there are usually 4) as most streets are difficult to cross or require walking over a bridge to cross.  Follow these tips and your subway adventures when you travel to Beijing will be a much smoother transition than when I first arrived.

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The Best of the West in the East

On June 12, 2012, in Beijing, Cool Places, Cultural Experience, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

When I told my friends and family about my plans to Travel to Beijing, the first question I was asked was always how I was going to deal with being in a new city on the other side of the world with no concrete plans outside of my Beijing Flights.  I usually responded with one […]

When I told my friends and family about my plans to Travel to Beijing, the first question I was asked was always how I was going to deal with being in a new city on the other side of the world with no concrete plans outside of my Beijing Flights.  I usually responded with one snarky remark or another, but then I realized that it wasn’t the first time a guy from New York made a new life on the other side of the world.  Stephon Marbury, like me, was born in Brooklyn and, like me, now lives on the other side of the world in Beijing, China.  However, unlike me, Stephon Marbury is a basketball champion on two continents.  Even so, he still serves as an inspiration to a kid from Brooklyn far away from home.

Marbury riding the Beijing subway

Riding tall on the Beijing subway

Back in 2000 when I was only ten my father took me to see Stephon Marbury and the New Jersey Nets play the Milwaukie Bucks.  Both teams were having comically bad years, and neither had any player whose name I still remember except for Marbury.  He had joined the NBA a few years earlier, and was just starting to come into his own.  After the game I waited for Marbury to try to get his autograph, and when he finally came out I was so excited I could barely stand still.  I handed him my pen and my Marbury Basketball Card, and with shaking hands dropped the pen I was trying to hand him.  The pen shattered along with my little heart.  Marbury saw what happened, ran off to the locker room, came back with a new pen, and signed my card.  From that point on I was a Nets fan for life.  Marbury went on to become an All-Star.

Fast forward twelve years, and the more things change the more they stay the same.  I had just arrived in Beijing and was

going to see the Forbidden City and who else do I see adorning the walls of the subways but Stephon Marbury.  Stephon was another kid from Brooklyn trying to make it on the other side of the world, and boy has he succeeded.  Now he plays on the Beijing Ducks, and he has turned the team around to become a major force in the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA).  The ducks went on to win the 2011-2012 championship, and to honor Marbury a statue was built in his honor outside of the MasterCard Center (formally known as The Beijing Wukesong Culture & Sports Center) where the basketball events were held in the 2008 Olympics.

Marbury's statue in Beijing

Imitating his own statue

When you travel to Beijing I highly recommend you make time to see a Beijing Ducks game.  You’ll be able to see one of Basketballs greatest players once more, meet some locals, and enjoy a little bit of home on the other side of the world.  And be sure to take a triumphant picture next to his statue because like Marbury, you can make it anywhere in the world.

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