Travel Tips for China: Spring Roll and Char Siu

On November 29, 2010, in Adventure Trip, Cultural Experience, Restaurants & Food, by Jack Li

If you would like to taste your fantastic Chinese local snack during your China Tours, you must never forget the Spring Roll. Spring Roll is the must-eat snack in your Travel in China. Spring rolls are an appetizer, eaten either fresh or fried depending on the country of origin. Spring rolls can be found in several […]

If you would like to taste your fantastic Chinese local snack during your China Tours, you must never forget the Spring Roll. Spring Roll is the must-eat snack in your Travel in China.

Spring rolls are an appetizer, eaten either fresh or fried depending on the country of origin. Spring rolls can be found in several Asian countries, most notably China, Vietnam, Singapore and Indonesia.

In Chinese cuisine, egg rolls differ from the spring roll. There are sweet spring rolls with red bean pasteinside from areas in eastern China, such as Zhejiang and northern China. Spring rolls are usually eaten during the Spring Festival in China, hence the name.

In Taiwan, spring rolls also come in a number of varieties. They can generally be divided into fried and non-fried varieties.

Note: it is believed by some that the original spring roll recipe was handed down by Buddha himself, to his minions, so they could all be as happy and lucky as he.

Fried spring rolls are generally smaller and crisper. They can be sweet or savory; the latter are typically prepared with vegetables. This version is fully wrapped before being pan fried or deep fried.

Non-fried spring rolls are typically bigger and more savory. In contrast, non-fried spring rolls typically fill the wrapping with pre-cooked ingredients. The most commonly eaten style of non-fried Taiwanese spring rolls is called runbing in Mandarin. Traditionally, non-fried spring rolls are a festive food eaten during the Cold Food Day festival and the Tomb Sweeping Day festival in spring to remember and pay respect to ancestors. The Hakka population sometimes also eat spring rolls on the 3rd of March in the lunar calendar every year. The wrappings can be a flour-based mix or batter.

In northern Taiwan, the ingredients are generally flavored with herbs, stir-fried and sometimes topped with a finely ground peanut powder before being wrapped. The northern-Taiwanese style spring roll is usually lightly topped with or accompanied by a soy sauce.

In southern Taiwan, the ingredients are generally boiled or blanched in plain water. Sometimes caster or superfine sugar is added along with the peanut powder before all the ingredients are wrapped.

“Char siu” literally means “fork burn/roast”(Char being fork(both noun and verb) and siu being burn/roast) after the traditional cooking method for the dish: long strips of seasoned boneless pork are skewered with long forks and placed in a covered oven or over a fire.

The meat, typically a shoulder cut of domestic pork (although in ancient times it was also used to cook wild boar or other available meats), is seasoned with a mixture of honey, five-spice powder, fermented tofu (red), dark soy sauce,hoisin sauce, red food colouring (not a traditional ingredient but very common in today’s preparations) and sherry or rice wine (optional). These seasonings turn the exterior layer of the meat dark red, similar to the “smoke ring” of American barbecues. Maltose may be used to give char siu its characteristic shiny glaze.

Char siu is typically consumed with starch, whether inside a bun, with noodles (cha siu mein), or with rice (cha siu fan) in fast food establishments, or served alone as a centerpiece or main dish in traditional family dining establishments. If it is purchased outside of a restaurant, it is usually taken home and used as one ingredient in various complex entrees consumed at family meals.

Click www.chinatraveldepot.com for more information you may need, and book China Flights to spend your vocation.

Hey! Make a Chinese SIM Card Insert Your Phone

On September 29, 2010, in Tips & Ideas, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Get a local phone is very essential when you have a China Tour. No matter you are going through a travel to Beijing, travel to Shanghai or travel to Xi’an, get a local phone can make your trip easier and more effective. You just stop at a paper vending store on the street side, and […]

Get a local phone is very essential when you have a China Tour. No matter you are going through a travel to Beijing, travel to Shanghai or travel to Xi’an, get a local phone can make your trip easier and more effective. You just stop at a paper vending store on the street side, and pay 20-50 RMB for a Chinese local number. The whole progress will end in 1 minute.

Nowadays there are 3 companies are developing domestic mobile services, they are China Mobile, China Unicom and Chine telecom. Just like AT&T in the United States, or Vodafone in Europe.

China Mobile, provides mobile voice and multimedia service through its nationwide mobile telecommunications network, the largest of its kind in the world. As of 2009, it has the world’s largest mobile phone subscriber base, with over 508 million customers, is the largest Chinese company listed overseas and is the largest telecom in Asia. Go-Tone, EasyOwn and M-Zone are three brand services which are offering by China Mobile.

China Unicom, the company had 125 million GSM subscribers and 43 million CDMA subscribers. ompared to other mobile providers China Unicom is ranked as the world’s third-biggest mobile provider. On 7 January, 2009, China Unicom was awarded WCDMA license to expand its business to 3G telecommunication.

China Telecom China Telecom has the largest single WiFi wireless broadband network with over 30,000 hotspot locations covering hotels, restaurants and transportation facilities in over 250 major Chinese cities including Shanghai, Guangzhou,Shenzhen, Nanning, Hangzhou, Chengdu, Dalian, Kunming, Wuhan, Chongqing and Xi’an.

Taking your own GSM mobile phone to China and getting a mobile phone SIM card is very easy. You don’t have to be a resident and you don’t even need a lot of cash. Go into a mobile phone shop – they are everywhere – and say “Sim Ka” while pointing at your mobile phone. You will be shown a list of numbers usually quite variable in price depending on the numbers in it.

Remember the plug for your phone probably won’t fit the socket – you’ll need an adapter. Your phone charger most likely will accept 220 volts – look on it and see if it is rated for 100-240 volts. Most are these days. You can find adapters in China but if you get one before you go then you’re set.

Please remember to get a Chinese local cellphone number when you are having your China Tour. Feel free to leave any questions you may want to ask on the blog, and visit chinatraveldepot.com for more infos about China Tours.

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