KTV, A Great experience

While travelling through China you should not miss to try out a cultural activity called “KTV” better known as “Karaoke”. It is fun to try and it makes you addicted! When my Chinese friends invited me to the KTV for the first time, I felt horrible. Karaoke is also known in my country but it […]

While travelling through China you should not miss to try out a cultural activity called “KTV” better known as “Karaoke”. It is fun to try and it makes you addicted!

When my Chinese friends invited me to the KTV for the first time, I felt horrible. Karaoke is also known in my country but it is quite different. A huge place like a restaurant or a bar where you have to sing in front of completely strangers whether on stage or on your place. I thought I do not want to be exposed like this, showing to everybody my inability of singing is not my deal pretty much. I took courage and followed my friends to the KTV. Under no circumstances I wanted to sing, I thought but then I was absolutely astonished and relieved both, when I realized that KTV in China is completely different and I started to understand why it is such a famous activity especially among young Chinese people. In China you are not in a big hall, bar or restaurant with other people you do not know. No, you get a room just for you and your friends. You can order food, snacks and drinks as well, which will be served by the waiter. There is a big comfortable couch in the room where you just sit in front of a big TV screen. You can choose songs in various languages as Chinese, English and sometimes even in other languages. You can choose a song you want to sing by yourself or in a group. At the beginning I felt strange to sing but you just have to try it once and I am sure you would like it.

Another day I went to KTV in China with my western friends and they all felt a bit shy at the beginning but as soon as someone started to sing, they warmed up. From then on they were very keen on KTV. A very cheap place for trying out KTV is in “Hothot” where you can spend 3 hours for only around 20 dollars and you even get served fruits and snacks.

Why is KTV that popular? I don’t know. We all sometimes like to sing under the shower or start to sing a popular song among 2 or 3 friends. So the KTV here gives you the perfect environment to sing with your friends. You can be three people, eight or even more.

Besides being cheap I think KTV is a good way to spend your leisure time. And no matter how terrible you sing, your friends will give you applause. And it’s not just about singing it is like socializing. You chat with your friends, discuss things and beside you also get the feeling of being a superstar.

KTV places can be found everywhere in China so don’t miss to try that out. It will make your travel in China a lot more entertaining.

A Brief Guide to Some Neighborhoods of Beijing

On July 10, 2012, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Beijing is a BIG city, but a definite must if your considering any China travel. So if and when you decide to travel to Beijing, here is a quick breakdown of some of the most well-known neighborhoods and what you’ll find there. Wudaokou: This is the main university hub (Peking University, Tsinghua, Beijing Language and […]

Beijing is a BIG city, but a definite must if your considering any China travel. So if and when you decide to travel to Beijing, here is a quick breakdown of some of the most well-known neighborhoods and what you’ll find there.

Wudaokou: This is the main university hub (Peking University, Tsinghua, Beijing Language and Culture University, etc.). This is also where most foreigners go to study Chinese in Beijing. That said, the entire west side of the city is a line of universities. Wudaokou has lots of Korean and Japanese food, too, as these are actually the largest foreign student communities.

CBD/Central Business District: This is where some of the tallest and most interesting buildings in Beijing are, such as the CCTV tower and the Place (a shopping mall with a giant LCD screen). A lot of expats work in this area. Little Moscow is near Ritan Park, which is a lovely outdoor sanctuary and well worth a visit. This is a very ritzy and modern area, and if you feel like getting down on the dance floor some new popular clubs are Spark and Haze.

798 Art District: 798 is an old factory area that was taken over by underground artists as a space to work without much public interference. However, over time this area has gained a lot more attention. These days, it’s more of a government-sanctioned arts space with galleries instead of artists. It’s now developing towards a nightlife spot, as well, with more and more cafes and bars.

Shunyi: Shunyi is a suburb of Beijing. Being from the States myself, this area is reminiscent of the American Style-suburbia complete with lovely homes and an affluent atmosphere.

Workers Stadium (Gongti) and Sanlitun Area: There are a lot of restaurants and clubs around Workers Stadium, and right down the road is the famous Sanlitun area. In the last 5 years, Sanlitun has turned into something of a modern, world-class nexus of foreigners and the more fashionable Chinese living in Beijing. At its center is the Sanlitun Village shopping mall. This has lots of western brand stores, including the Apple Store. If you head through the Village mall, you’ll come to what might be called “the Sanlitun back street,” which is the place where people actually go to find some decent restaurants and some nice and some less nice clubs/bars.

Drum Tower (Gulou) Area: Gulao stretches from the Lama Temple in the east to Hou Hai Lake in the west, from the Second Ring Road in the north, to Yugong Yishan Bar in the south. This area is mostly still “Hutong” alleys, and is the hip youth, crafty, musical area of the city. Its center could be said to be Nanluoguxiang (NLGX for short), a kilometer-long alley running north-south full of shops, restaurants, cafes, and bars. It’s a great place to take a stroll and see some of the original founders of the street. Its northern entrance is on the second main artery: Gulou Dong Dajie (Drum Tower East Avenue), this area is full of spaces that seamlessly mingle food, drinking, and coffee house-atmosphere. Two of the most well-known of these would be Cafe Zarah and Alba. That said, around every corner is another little place to make your own. Drinking and eating prices in this area are generally cheaper than Sanlitun and the CBD. It’s also home to the Chinese folk-rock scene, which is a must-do.

Now that you know what Beijing’s unique neighborhoods have to offer be sure to stop by any that interest you or all of them on your own Beijing tour.

Enjoy and Embrace the Delicious taste of Jiaozi!!

On January 19, 2012, in Cool Places, Cultural Experience, Restaurants & Food, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

While you are enjoying your China Tour why not attempt to make some jiaozi (Chinese Dumplings). You can either take a cooking class in which ever city you are in or attempt to get the ingredients yourself and make them in your China hotel room.  Making jiaozi is a very popular tradition for the Chinese […]

While you are enjoying your China Tour why not attempt to make some jiaozi (Chinese Dumplings). You can either take a cooking class in which ever city you are in or attempt to get the ingredients yourself and make them in your China hotel room.  Making jiaozi is a very popular tradition for the Chinese especially in Northern China around the holidays with their families. There are many different ingredients you can use to make jiaozi, so it is up to you how you want it to taste.

 

The art of dumpling making can be dated back since the Sung Dynasty and has forever been tradition in the Chinese culture.  It is very traditional on New Year’s Eve (Spring Festival) for the whole family to get together and make jiaozi where every member is assigned to different tasks on the process of making them. The jiaozi is seen as a lucky food; reason being is because of the shape they are made to. It is made into a crescent shape which resembles good wealth due to the fact that they look similar to the traditional silver and gold ingots. In some family traditions, there is one dumpling which will have a coin in it and whoever gets that one will definitely have good wealth for the year.

 

In regards to making the dumplings, you can use whatever ingredients you like as your filler. There is a wide variety of dumplings; even some restaurants may offer you 25 different kinds on their menu. So you can either make it out of any kind of meat mince, seafood or vegetables. The vital part of the dumpling is the wrap; this is made out of flour and a little bit of water. Once you make the dough cut it into smaller pieces and create small flat circles. But keep in mind to make sure the middle of the circle is thicker than the rest; this will prevent it from splitting. Once you have done the dough make it into a small cup in your hands and put your filler in. The filler can consist of meat, vegetables, soy sauce, oil, garlic and ginger. It is entirely up to you. Once the filler is in fold it in half and pinch the top together creating a crescent shape. Make sure that you firmly squeeze the the sides together so it doesn’t burst open, if needed add extra bit of water and flour. Once that is done slightly curve the dumpling so it can sit by itself.

 

In regards to cooking jiaozi, place it in a boiling pot but however do add an extra cup of cold water. By adding cold water it will prevent the dumpling from bursting open due to the boiling water and keep stirring throughout. When the dumplings are floating at the top it means that they are ready to eat. It is a very easy, quick and enjoyable dish to make especially with people.

So if you are travelling to Beijing, Shanghai, Xi’an, Guangzhou, Guilin or any place in China find out if there are any cooking classes to attend or take up the challenge of making them yourself or with a Chinese family. If you are in China for Spring Festival, do not forget to make jiaozi on New Year’s Eve or order them at a restaurant. Enjoy and embrace the delicious tradition of jiaozi!!

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The People’s Money

On January 18, 2012, in Cool Places, Featured China Stories, Shopping, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

When booking your China Tour it is highly recommended that you exchange a small amount of money before you arrive into China. The Chinese Renminbi or RMB is known as ‘the people’s money’ and there are different ways of saying the currencies. You will hear people say Yuan which is said similar to ‘you-on’ or […]

When booking your China Tour it is highly recommended that you exchange a small amount of money before you arrive into China. The Chinese Renminbi or RMB is known as ‘the people’s money’ and there are different ways of saying the currencies. You will hear people say Yuan which is said similar to ‘you-on’ or you will hear Kaui and it is pronounced similar to ‘kwhy’. There are many different notes and coins which you need to get familiar with and need to be aware of the counterfeiting of the 100 and 50 Yuan. So while you are on your long China Flight, study your notes and coins so you can become familiar with them all.

 

On the foreign exchange bureaus China is known as CNY which is abbreviated for the Chinese Yuan. In regards to exchanging money if you are staying in a four or five star hotel they provide this service or if your hotel doesn’t, head to the Bank of China. Bank of China is one of the biggest banks and is located all over China especially in Beijing and they have all currencies within the branch. An important reminder, don’t forget to take your passport with you when exchanging money.

 

Since December 1948, five editions of the Chinese Yuan have been released; the final edition was released in October 1999. In regards to your notes there is 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100. With the coins there is 0.1, 0.5 and 1. The 1 Yuan comes in a note and in a coin form, the 1 Yuan coin is the largest silver coin. In relations to 0.1 and 0.5 they are called Jiao or known as Mao and they both come in note and coin forms, the 0.5 is a gold coin and the 0.1 is a small silver coin. In their note forms they are a smaller size compared to the Yuan.

 

 

Like in many countries, counterfeit currency is common in China. It is mainly the bigger notes which are targeted so either the 50 or 100 Yuan. There are many ways to determine if you have received a counterfeit note or not. On the back of all notes there will be what they call as a security line, this looks like silver shiny sections going down in a straight line in the middle of the note. On the front of the note there will be a water mark on the left side of the note, this was released in the fifth edition and when it is moved back and forth you will be able to see Mao Zedong. Also when you move the note back and forth the denominator ID on the left side will change colour. Therefore the 100 will change from green to blue and the 50 will change from gold to green. You can also determine if the note is real or not by touching Mao Zedong’s collar, it should feel bumpy along with the curve pattern on the edge of the right side it should also feel bumpy. It is quite easy to detect, it is also very common if a clerk will check your note before putting it away. However if you stumble across a fake note unfortunately there is not much you can do with it and the banks will not exchange it for a real one. The only time you can swap it back is if you received it at the bank and you checked the note before you left the premises.

 

So when you arrive in China and tour this wonderful country you will now have a better understanding of the different types of notes and coins you will come across. Also by being aware of the potential risk of coming across a counterfeit 50 or 100 Yuan will definitely
reassure you when you experience the great shopping the Chinese have to offer.

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Part 2- A Quick Guide to China Trains

On November 16, 2011, in Tips & Ideas, Travel Info, by Jack Li

The best way to get around on your China Tour is by trains. Some people might not like traveling by trains because they don’t know the basic information on trains. My “Part One of a Quick Guide to China Trains” talked about how to buy tickets and where you need to go to buy tickets. This […]

The best way to get around on your China Tour is by trains. Some people might not like traveling by trains because they don’t know the basic information on trains. My “Part One of a Quick Guide to China Trains” talked about how to buy tickets and where you need to go to buy tickets. This article will be on the Train Reservations and train’s stations. By the time you are finished reading these articles you will want to leave your China hotel so that you can experience the joy of riding a train.

Train Reservation

Before you buy your ticket you need to know when you can reserve it. You can buy your train ticket Ten to five days before you depart. Most train tickets will be put on sale ten days before the train departs. If you feel like it a busy destination then you will want to go buy your ticket on the day they start to sell them to make sure you get your ticket before they sell out.

Train Station

As you enter the train station be ready to put your luggage through a scanning machine. A number of train stations in China have first class waiting room or second class waiting room. If you have a soft-sleeper or a soft seat then you can wait in the first class waiting room. If you have a hard seat or a hard-sleeper then you have to wait in the second class waiting room. Make sure you get to the train station early so you have enough time to find your waiting room and you also have enough time to board your train. It is also a good idea to arrive early so that you can have a seat in the waiting room or you will be standing or sitting on the ground, seeing as the train stations get very busy.

At each train station there will be an electric panel with train numbers and where it’s headed. Each electric panel has two colors red and green; when the electric panel turns green that will be your signal to board your train. To find your train carriage you will need to look at the carriage to see if it has a number or letter if it not there look at the ground next to the carriage it will be written there. Make sure you do not throw away your ticket because you will need it to exit the train.

Taking a train will be enjoyable because you have the opportunity to look out the window and see what China is really about. Looking out the window will show you how different each place is from how people live and what types of houses they live in. You will also be able to see different landscapes. Some of the most beautiful sights you will see will be from your train window. As soon as you plan your China Travel make certain that you plan on traveling by a train.

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Ultimate Iphone Apps for your trip to China: Part One

On September 7, 2011, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Tips & Ideas, Travel Info, by Jack Li

For your upcoming China tour or holiday, you might be interested in some of the most useful Iphone Apps for your trip. China Travel can be daunting and might be confusing in the beginning, but don’t fret as There’s An App For That!   DianHua Dictionary (free) DianHua is an online Chinese to English dictionary […]

For your upcoming China tour or holiday, you might be interested in some of the most useful Iphone Apps for your trip. China Travel can be daunting and might be confusing in the beginning, but don’t fret as There’s An App For That!

 

DianHua Dictionary (free)

DianHua is an online Chinese to English dictionary application using CC-CEDICT and provides support for both Traditional and Simplified characters, alongside English and Mandarin Pinyin. You are also able to search by drawing characters, and can include or omit the tones. The application has copy and paste support and will also store your previously searched words allowing you to make flashcards for future use. You can also bookmark phrases and words together under categories to make it easier to find and memorise them.

 

There is also a separate number section allowing you to convert numbers and listen to them orally with the audio playback feature. If you wish to learn characters there is an enlarged view of both Traditional and Simplified characters available allowing you to study and trace over them with the stylus.

 


Additionally there is a feature to create your own flashcards using words you have been learning, and you can combine this with the writing feature. Both of these elements will tell you how well you are doing and there will be a percentage on display on screen to mark your progress.

 

Other available dictionary software applications include Qingwen, KTdict and Pleco.

 

XE Currency (free)

A simple yet vital application is XE Currency Convertor. You can convert the Chinese Renminbi into any other world currency with the click of a button, including multiple currencies at once. With an internet connection you will get a live current exchange rate result, but the app is also available offline to use as it stores data enabling you to view the previously loaded exchange rate.

 

Whats App (0.69p)

This application is ideal for those travelling anywhere outside of their home country, especially if you do not wish to be charged the extortionate fees for international text messaging. With an internet connection (or 3G signal) you can send unlimited text and picture messages to your automatically imported contact list, and it is also compatible with Android, Nokia and Blackberry phones enabling you to keep contact with friends and family who don’t use an Iphone.

 

You can also send audio files and video messages, and the recent update includes a group chat feature enabling you to talk to multiple contacts in one conversation.

 

Doodle Chinese (free)

From the makers of Doodle Jump comes Doodle Chinese, a fun animated style application to make picking up Mandarin phrases more enjoyable! Suitable for all ages the app builds up your language skills from basic words to scenario conversations. Quizzes and game based practices help you to memorise what you have understood.

 

Doodle Chinese uses a Native Chinese Speaker for all audio phrases, and comes with Pinyin and English translation for every phrase. You are able to switch between Pinyin and Chinese Characters whenever you wish, and can share your progress with your friends online.

 

Check back for Part Two of the Ultimate Iphone Apps for China travel!

 

A Simple Guide to Airport Transportation

On September 6, 2011, in Beijing, Getting Around, Transportation, Travel Info, by Jack Li

You may be wondering about the possible transport options from Beijing Capital International Airport to your Beijing hotel accommodation. Few airlines arrive at Terminal 1 which caters to mostly domestic flights, so you will most likely arrive at 2 or 3. Terminal 2 is the base for major airlines such as KLM, Delta and China […]

You may be wondering about the possible transport options from Beijing Capital International Airport to your Beijing hotel accommodation. Few airlines arrive at Terminal 1 which caters to mostly domestic flights, so you will most likely arrive at 2 or 3. Terminal 2 is the base for major airlines such as KLM, Delta and China Eastern Airlines, and Terminal 3 is the home of British Airways, Emirates, Air China and Cathay Pacific.

 

There is a free shuttle bus service which connects all the terminals. From 6am until 11pm buses depart every 10 minutes, and outside of this time there is usually a bus once every half hour. The airport is 27km from the town centre and journey times into town will vary depending on your arrival time, this can be up to one hour and may be much less if you do not face any of the notorious Beijing traffic!

 

Possible Transport Options:

  • Airport Shuttle
  • Airport Express (Subway)
  • Taxi

 

Airport Shuttle

The downtown shuttle to the center of Beijing is 16 RMB per person, per ride. There are also shuttles available that head further out, to the border cities such as Tanggu and Tianjin. Tickets are available within the terminal. For Terminal 1 you will find a ticket office at Gate 7, Terminal 2 at gates 9, 10 and 11, and at Terminal 3 next to gates 5, 7 and 11. All these ticket offices are on the first floor, Terminal 3 also has offices on the second floor.

 

There are 9 shuttle lines heading to different sections of the city:

  • Line 1: Airport to Fangzhuang (7am – 1am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 2: Airport to Xidan (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 3: Airport to Beijing Railway Station (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 4: Airport to Gongzhufen (6.50am – 12am) Return Journey (4.50am – 22pm)
  • Line 5: Airport to Zhongguancun (6.50am – 12am) Return Journey (5.30am til 9pm)
  • Line 6: Airport to Wangjing (7am – 22.30pm) Return Journey (5.30am – 8.30pm)
  • Line 7: Airport to Beijing West Railway Station (7.20am – 12am) Return (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 8: Airport to Shangdi (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.30am – 6.30pm)

Follow signs at the airport to find your shuttle, buses usually leave when they are full.

 

Airport Express (Subway)

The airport express (subway line) has four stops on the route:

  • Dongzhimen, Sanyuanqiao, Terminal 3, and Terminal 2.

The journey costs 25 RMB for a one way trip and takes approximately 30 minutes. Carriages leave every 15 minutes and the service operates from 6.35am – 23.10pm from Terminal 2, and 6.20am – 22.50pm from Terminal 3.

Taxi

You can easily catch a taxi to and from the airport, and this is the best option if there are a few of you and you have lots of luggage – but it will be the most expensive. Taxi ranks are located outside the airport, Terminal 1 has stops outside gates 3 to 5, Terminal 2 outside gates 3 to 7, and Terminal 3 has signs within the building directing you to the taxi stand. The minimum charge is 10 RMB for the first 3km, after this each further km will cost 2 RMB.

 

Taxi Tips

  • Insist that the driver uses the meter, ‘Qǐng Dǎbiǎo’ means put the meter on please.
  • Have your destination written in chinese characters as many drivers do not speak English.
  • Be aware of toll charges which you cover in addition to the fare.
  • Be sure to get a licensed taxi with official certification.
  • Note down the taxi number if you have any problems.

 

In addition many of the higher end hotels provide complimentary shuttles for guests so this may also be worth looking into when you travel to Beijing.

 

Shop ‘Til You Drop’ at the Beijing Silk Market

On September 5, 2011, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Shopping, by Jack Li

One of the Must See Attractions when you travel to Beijing is the enormous six storey Silk Market. It is very convenient on the subway from most Beijing hotels and taxi prices are reasonable, just be sure to get the chinese name for where you are going as there is a very high chance the driver […]

One of the Must See Attractions when you travel to Beijing is the enormous six storey Silk Market. It is very convenient on the subway from most Beijing hotels and taxi prices are reasonable, just be sure to get the chinese name for where you are going as there is a very high chance the driver will not speak any English.

You will find a huge amount of stalls selling a variety of merchandise, and there is an entrance directly from Yong’anli subway station which brings you into the centre of the action, starting at the lower floors selling mostly handbags and shoes. Goods are mostly imitations of well known designer and high street brands, although non branded items are available alongside this. All the big brands are here including Chanel, Mulberry, Louis Vuitton, Christian Louboutin etc and there is quite a range of high street from Adidas to Zara.


The pedestrian entrance walking from the subway to the market itself is also worth a look, as it sells a range of trinkets, magnets, gadgets and stationary – perfect as a gift for someone back home! There are also unusual inventions here that you would expect to see in Asia, for instance a mini fish tank complete with a built in alarm clock, side light and pen holder!

 

You can catch the lift or take escalators up to the further levels selling clothing, electronics, jewellery, children’s toys and homeware products, you name it and there is a high chance it is probably for sale at the market somewhere! Even newer and less obvious brands are replicated at the Silk Market, for example Cath Kidston’s iconic floral printed accessories and the very popular Lelli Kelly embellished children’s shoes.

 

There are many restaurants and snack stalls around, they appear to be more concentrated on the higher levels and prices are reasonable. The famous Quanjude Peking Duck restaurant has a space on the sixth floor and there are also other food options such as a McDonalds within walking distance.

The market is extremely busy, usually attracting around 50,000 visitors on a daily basis, therefore the sellers are very experienced and will start with extortionate prices. Be prepared to haggle hard as the starting price is likely to be hugely inflated, it is possible for a starting price of 5000 RMB to be haggled down to around 80 RMB. It is easy to spend all day there, exploring the various stalls and different quality of items available.

 

If you are after a slightly easier time with more chance of a bargain or just a tiny bit more space it may be worth visiting in the early morning or evening, as the market is open daily from 9am until 9pm, however due to the guaranteed hoards of potential customers you may still end up paying more than you should be.

 

If you are unsure about navigating the market or the sights and sounds of china, there are many Beijing tours available including specialist shopping tours. There are options for whatever length you require, including multi trip tours that also visit other major Chinese places of interest such as Shanghai and Xian.

The Lama Temple

On June 21, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Beijing, Cool Places, Cultural Experience, by Jack Li

Travel to Beijing to day and visit one of the many historical sites in the city. Lama temple also known as the palace of peace and harmony is both a temple and a school of Tibetan Buddhism located in the northeast of Beijing. This temple is one of the largest and most important Tibetan Buddhist […]

Travel to Beijing to day and visit one of the many historical sites in the city. Lama temple also known as the palace of peace and harmony is both a temple and a school of Tibetan Buddhism located in the northeast of Beijing. This temple is one of the largest and most important Tibetan Buddhist temples in the world.  Fly with air China and see the beautiful work of artistry in the Lama temple.

Lama temple is also referred to as the YongHeGong temple. The construction of the temple originally started in the Qing Dynasty in 1694. Initially, it was used as an official residence for court eunuchs, and then the emperor’s son converted it into the court of Prince YongZheng. After the death of the YongZheng, half of the temple was changed into a lamasery while the other half remained an imperial palace. YongZheng’s casket was placed in the temple for those who wanted to mourn his death. Emperor QianLong, successor to YongZheng, transformed the yellow tiles in the temple into blue, giving the building and imperial look. The temple has now become a national centre of Lama administration.

There are five main halls separated by courtyards in the lama temple: the Hall of Heavenly Kings (Tian Wang Dian Hall), the Hall of Harmony and Peace (YongHeGong), the Hall of Everlasting protection (YongYouDian), the Hall of Wheel of the Law (FalunDian) and the Pavilion of Ten Thousand Happiness (WanFuGe). The first courtyard in YongHeGong is tilted Gate of Peace Declaration. Following this gate is another titled Gate of Peace. Manchu, Mongolian and Tibetan are inscribed in Chinese on the pavilion stand in the temple to mark the history of the temple.

The Hall of the Heavenly Kings was previously the main entrance of the building. There are two pagoda’s located on each side of the statue of the Maitreya Buddha. Small Buddhist images are placed next to each pagoda symbolizing longevity. The Hall of Harmony and Peace represents the main building of YongHeGong. Three bronze statues of Buddha’s are located inside the hall. A statue of the Gautama Buddha is at the center with the statue of Kasyapa on the right and the statue of Maltreya on the left.

The Hall of Everlasting protection was emperor YongZheng’s living quarter; his coffin is currently buried in this location. The Hall of wheel of the Law consists of five pagodas that serve as a place for reading scriptures and conducting religious ceremonies. It also has the statue of Tsong Khapa founder of the Geluk school of Buddhism, on a lotus. The hall has statues of arhats made out of gold, silver, copper, iron and tin.

The pavilion of ten thousand happiness contains the statue of the Maitreya Buddha carved from a single piece of white sandalwood. The statue is one of three artworks in the temple that were included in the Guinness book of record.

If you would like to see this historical temple, travel to Beijing today. You can also see other historical locations in China like the Forbidden City, the Temple of heaven, Tiananmen Square and many more.

 

 

One of the Seven Wonders of the world

On June 20, 2011, in Cool Places, Must-sees, Tours, by Jack Li

The great wall was developed in the Ming dynasty as a result of disturbances from the Dadan, Tufan and Nuzhen. The main line of the wall started from Jiuliancheng near the Yalu River in the east to the west of Juyongguan pass.  The complete wall now stretches from Shanhaiguan in the east, to Lop Nur […]

The great wall was developed in the Ming dynasty as a result of disturbances from the Dadan, Tufan and Nuzhen. The main line of the wall started from Jiuliancheng near the Yalu River in the east to the west of Juyongguan pass.  The complete wall now stretches from Shanhaiguan in the east, to Lop Nur in the west, around the southern edge of Mongolia.  The great wall is one of the Seven Wonders of the World. You can visit this wonderful location by booking through travel to Beijing. Cheap China Flights are also available.

Before the great wall was built, the Chinese people had prior experience in wall building. The wall was made by rammed earth and gravel between board frames. During the Ming dynasty, the wall was constructed to along the northern border of China. The Ming construction of the great wall was much stronger than the previous dynasty due to the use of bricks and stones rather than rammed earth.  As the Mongolian raid in china intensified, the Ming devoted more time towards the repair and reinforcement of the wall. The section closer to Beijing was made the strongest.

Today, the different sections of the great wall include Gubeiko, JinshanLing, Simatai, Jiankou, Mutianyu, Huanghua, Juyongguan and Badaling. Juyongguan and Badaling are the closest sections to Beijing. Badaling is the most visited by tourists. It is a great section for viewing the full beauty of the wall. Mutianyu is a good section for those who would prefer hiking the wall; it is also much steeper than Badaling.

In the ancient times, Badaling section was used to protect the capital from the attack of foreign bodies. As a result, Badaling was given the name North Gate. Over one hundred million visitors have walked on the Badaling section of the great wall. Mutianyu section is in between Juyongguan, Badaling, Jiankou and Huanghua in the west, and Gubeiko, Simatai and JinshanLing to the east. This section is the largest and the best overall in quality. The unique feature in Mutianyu section of the wall is the presence of watchtowers. Compared to other sections, Mutianyu has twenty-two watchtowers, which makes it easier to view the scenery of the wall in every hundred meters.

If you prefer going to a less crowded section of the wall, Simatai is the best option. It is over hundred kilometers on the northeastern side of Beijing. Twenty well-preserved watchtowers are located on the west and thirteen rugged watchtowers are located on the east. Part of JinshanLing has been restored, and is located at the west of Simatai. During the summer, Huanghua section usually has yellow flowers, which explains the name Huanghua meaning yellow flower. Jiankou great wall is built along the mountains, making it a very good place for viewing the wall. Close to Juyongguan are other historical attractions like the life sized terracotta warriors and a temple. Gubeiko is connected to both JinshanLing and Simatai.

Having the opportunity to view all the sections of the wall was a very exciting experience. Each section had its own unique feature making it stand out in comparison to the other sections. If you are interested in seeing one of the Seven Wonders of the World, book your China Flights today and visit all or your favorite section of the Great Wall.

 

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