Duoqia Temple

On August 26, 2011, in Lakes, Temples, Tibet, by Jack Li

Though there are only 15 shamen in Duoqia Temple, it is the largest temple around Nam Lake. The temple is built on the island nearby the lake. It is a good place for practice Buddhism for there are many caves on the island. There is one mysterious riddle of Duoqia Temple: every night people can […]

Though there are only 15 shamen in Duoqia Temple, it is the largest temple around Nam Lake. The temple is built on the island nearby the lake. It is a good place for practice Buddhism for there are many caves on the island. There is one mysterious riddle of Duoqia Temple: every night people can hear the voice of carving the stone, but when people come near, the voice disappears. When people walk away, the voice began again.

Walking about six kilometers, you will arrive at the world’s wonder in the Tibetan people “Cuckoo in the Sun”. Here and there, you can see all kinds of images of fowls and beasts, flowers and trees, cloud and letters. What is mysterious is that the images will change, sometimes clear and sometimes blurring, but nobody can tell the reason.

Walk on and you will reach Qiaduo Nanka Island, which is also a sacred place. Opposite to Danggula Mountain, there are two stone pillars here; one is an integral whole while the other has a crack in it. Some people think this is the symbol of the two opposing principles in nature. There are people calling the two stone pillars the “Door-God” of Danggula. There are many statues of Buddha and caves and you can often see Mongolian gazelles and bharals on the island.

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Nam Lake

On August 26, 2011, in Lakes, Mountain Areas, Nature Scenery, Tibet, by Jack Li

The meaning of Nam Lake in Tibetan language is “Sky Lake”, which is one of the three sacred lakes. The lake is at the altitude of 4718 meters, 70 kilometers long from west to east and 30 kilometers wide from south to north, with an area of 1920 square kilometers. It is the biggest lake […]

The meaning of Nam Lake in Tibetan language is “Sky Lake”, which is one of the three sacred lakes. The lake is at the altitude of 4718 meters, 70 kilometers long from west to east and 30 kilometers wide from south to north, with an area of 1920 square kilometers. It is the biggest lake in Tibet, the second biggest lagoon in China and the world’s highest big lake. It is in the mountain area which is about 60 kilometers away from the northwest part of Xiong County. It has a sacred position in the eyes of Tibetan people. When it is the year of goat in Tibetan calendar, numerous pilgrims from afar will come here to take part in the grand “Zhuan Lake Festival”.

Nam Cuo is called Nam Lake is on the Tibetan Plateau China. According to the historical records, the lake seems that the sky lands on the ground, so it is called “Sky Lake”. However, the herdsmen around the lake have that it is called “Sky Lake” for the altitude of is so high as if it were in the sky. In the Tibetan language, “Cuo” means lake. The local Tibetan people call it Tangri Sea, which means “Sky Lake”. The believers respect it as one of the four bold lakes, which is the Buddhist rite of Cakrasamvara. It is a famous Holy Land of Tibetan Buddhism.

The shape of Nam Lake is like lying Buddha. There are 18 girders in the south of the lake like Turtle Girder and Peacock Girder while there are 18 islands in the north of the lake such as Duck Island and Bird Island. There are four temples around the lake, the Zhaxi Duoboqie Temple in the east, Guerqiong Baima Temple in the south, Duojia Temple in the west, and Qiatuo Temple in the north, which symbolize the “irritation, anger, authority and power.” There are many naturally shaped images of Buddha on the walls of the temples. The legend has that Nam Lake is the daughter of Lord Shakya and the mother of Chen-thang-lha, so it regarded as one of the place that you must visit by those devout men and women.

There are five islands standing in the water, which are said to be the incarnation of Five Dhyani Buddhas. Whoever goes to the lake must prostrate themselves in worship. Among the islands, the largest one Liangduo Island accounts for 12000 square kilometers. Besides there are five islands into the water from different directions, among which the Zhaxi Peninsula is the most famous one. The numerous stelaes and stone mountains take all kinds of shapes: some are strong as elephant noses; some are like human bodies and others are like cypresses, vivid and absolutely lifelike. You can also see different caves, which have short or long entrances. Some of the caves have naturally shaped windows while others are filled with stalactites. There are strange stones and mountain forests here and there and connecting mountain forests are stone bridges, which are all marvelous creations excelling nature and wonderful sights.

Nam Lake Attractions

Zhaxi Peninsula

Duoqia Temple

Nam Lake Story

1.   Sky Lake Goddess

Nam Lake is Sky Lake Goddess. The legend has that the water resources in the Nam Lake is the magical water in the Heavenly Palace as well as a perfect mirror for goddess in Heavenly Palace. Another saying has that there is a beautiful and diligent herds girl getting the decree of God in one dream. She comes to the Nam Lake and sees a gorgeous woman asking her to pick up a child on April 15 at Pu Sulong. Later the decree comes true. Tibetan Buddhism regards Nam Lake as the incarnation of lying Mother Buddha, so it is a famous sacred place.

2. The Origin of Nam Lake

About the cause of formation of Nam Lake, there is a legend among people. Long ago, there was a beautiful and healthy girl who grazed at the meadow in the north of Tibet all year around. One night, she dreamt that from Danggula Mountains came a man in white clothes, hat and on a ride horse and dated with her. Later the girl had a boy baby. The boy grew very fast to be tall and strong.

Right by their tent, there was a huge rock. According to the old people, there was a well under it connecting with sea. Nobody was allowed to remove the rock; otherwise there would be a disaster. However, the boy was so curious to try his strength, so by lifting up slightly, he removed the rock. He put the rock aside and went back to his tent. Suddenly he heard the huge noise of water and the rough waves came at him. He hurriedly ran into the tent, carrying his mother on back and ran to the mountain. They stood at the top of the mountain and saw that the water level was still rising, so his mother asked him to remove the mountains to block the water. He moved 18 mountains from the south part of Danggula Mountains and 19 mountains from the north part, which finally block the water. The water surrounded by these mountains is the Nam Lake nowadays. Then to support life, the boy drove back wild yaks. When his mother did not pay attention, fifty yaks ran away, which are the ancestors of the wild yaks today. The wild yaks which did not escape turn into the domestic yaks today.

Once, when the boy grazed, he met an old man in all white and riding a white horse who said he can realize all the wishes of the boy. Then the old man took the young boy to a crystal treasure-house which was filled with treasure. The old man let him to pick up three things and he would give the boy the things he had held. The boy picked up salt, soda and white sea snails and he took these things home happily. This is the resource of salt and soda produced in Nam Lake while the white sea snails turn into the white sheep around the lake.

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The Jokhang Temple Travel Tips

On August 25, 2011, in Popular Provinces, Temples, Tibet, Travel Info, by Jack Li

The Jokhang Temple is located in the center of the ancient Town of Lhasa. It was built by Songtsen Gampo, a great King in the history of Tibet, for his wife, Princess Chizun from Nepal. It is a sacred place for Tibetan Buddhists. On the Golden Roof of the temple, you can see the faraway […]

The Jokhang Temple is located in the center of the ancient Town of Lhasa. It was built by Songtsen Gampo, a great King in the history of Tibet, for his wife, Princess Chizun from Nepal. It is a sacred place for Tibetan Buddhists. On the Golden Roof of the temple, you can see the faraway Potala Palace shrouded by beautiful sunlight, and the crowds of people on the square of the Jokhang Temple. The butter-oil lamps in the temple is lighting all the time, just like the belief of Buddhism in Tibet.

Best Seasons to visit the Jokhang Temple

It is advisable to visit Lhasa from June to September because the weather is relatively mild then. Meanwhile, in March, many wild ducks will pass through the Lhasa River duiring their migration. If you are very interested in bird watching, you’d better schedule your trip in March. In addition, on the 15th day of the first lunar month every year, the Lantern Festival, a grand religious ceremony, will be held in the Jokhang Temple. Lamas and local craftmen will make various kinds of colorful butter flowers by hand and put them inside the lanterns hung in the temple. When the Lanterns are lighted up at night, the whole temple will be like a fairyland. You can see elegant flowers, different Chinese Gods and Goddesses, great achievers in the Chinese history on the cover of the lanterns. It is strongly recommendable to visit the temple at that time since the Lantern Festival is a very good opportunity for you to experience the rich Chinese culture.

The Jokhang Temple Travel Route

The Main Gate—The Geshe Square (Lamas are entitled with the name “Geshe” on the square)—The Main Hall—The Side Hall (There are statues of TsongKhapa and his eight disciples in the hall)—The Hall of Avalokitesvara—The Hall of Amitabha Buddha—The Hall of Qamba Buddha—The Hall of Dharmaraja (It is on the second floor, and only open in the morning.)—The Hall of Bandanlamu—The Golden Roof

The Jokhang Temple Ticket

Ticket price for the Jokhang Temple:

RMB 85 per person in peak seasons (from April 21th to October 19th )

RMB 35 per person in slack season (from October 20th to April the 20th next year)

Opening hours: 9:00~18:00

Notice: In the afternoon, there will be a sermon on the second floor of the temple, and it is worth attending. You do not need to buy another ticket if you want to revisit the temple during your stay. And if you want to take photos inside the Main Hall, you will need to pay 90 Yuan for the permission.

 How to get to the Johhang Temple

By air

There is an airport located 100 kilometers away to the south of Lhasa. Tourists can fly to the airport from citis like Beijing, Shanhai, and Katmandu, and take a bus or a taxi to the city of Lhasa. It takes 2 hours to reach the city by bus, and the ticket price is 20 Yuan per person. You can also take a taxi, and the price will be 150~250 Yuan per ride.

By Coach

You can take a couch from Bayi, Changdu, Chengdu, Rikaze, Zhangmu, Jiangzi, or Geermu, and arrived at the Coach Station of Lhasa. The following is a list of ticket price.

Ticket price from Geermu to Lhasa: RMB 262 per person

Ticket price from Zedang to Lhasa: RMB 28 per person.

Ticket price from Changdu to Lhasa: RMB 228 per person

Ticket price from Chengdu to Lhasa: RMB 443 per person

Ticket price from Rikaze to Lhasa: RMB 40 per person

Ticket price from Zhangmu to Lhasa: RMB 113 per person

Ticket price from Jiangzi to Lhasa: RMB 38 per person

 Transportation Inside the City of Lhasa

By taxi

There are more than 1500 taxis in the city. You can easily find one whenever you want to take taxi. It takes no more than ten Yuan to travel around the city by taxi.

By bus or minibus

Buses in Lhasa run every half an hour, and the ticket price is 1 Yuan per person. It is also very convinient to take a minibus to the temple. The ticket price is 2 Yuan per person. Remember to ask the driver whether the minibus stopped at the temple or not before you get on the minibus.

By tricycle

A tricycle can take two passengers per ride, and only work within the city. Ususally, the price for one ride is between 4 Yuan to 7 Yuan.

By bycycle

You can rent a bike in almost all the hotels in Lhasa, and the price is 2 Yuan per hour, 20 Yuan per day. Or you can chose the mountain bike, while the price is 3 Yuan per hour, 30 Yuan per day.

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The Jokhang Temple

On August 25, 2011, in Lhasa, Temples, Tibet, by Jack Li

The Jokhang Temple (Tibetan, meaning the Buddha Temple) was built in 647 of the Tang Dynasty by the order of Sontzen Gampo in memory of Princess Chizun’s coming to Tibet. After the renovation and expansion by successive generations, it has become a large-scale complex covering more than 25,100 square metres. The Jokhang Temple is a […]

The Jokhang Temple (Tibetan, meaning the Buddha Temple) was built in 647 of the Tang Dynasty by the order of Sontzen Gampo in memory of Princess Chizun’s coming to Tibet. After the renovation and expansion by successive generations, it has become a large-scale complex covering more than 25,100 square metres. The Jokhang Temple is a Tibetan Buddhist temple situated at the centre of Lhasa, and holds a supreme position in Tibetan Buddhism. In 2000, the Jokhang Temple was rated the world’s heritage.

The construction of the Jokhang Temple began in the prime days of the Tubo Dynasty for the purpose of worshipping the life-size statue of Sakyamuni of the age of eight which was brought to Tibet by Princess Chizun from Nepal when she came to marry Sontzen Gampo. Now enshrined in the Jokhang Temple is the life-size statue of Sakyamuni of the age of twelve brought there by Princess Wencheng; the one of the age of eight is transferred to the Ramoche Temple.

The temple was first named the Temple of the Goat and the Earth because during its construction people used goats to carry the earth to the site. In 1409, Master Tsongkapa, founder of the Gelu Buddhist denomination, summoned all the Buddhist denominations and held the Great Prayer Festival in this temple to extol the feat of Sakyamuni. Later the temple was changed into the Jokhang Temple in honour of this event.

The Jokhang Temple is the most splendid building of the Tubo Dynasty as well as the oldest civil-structure building existing in Tibet. It combines the architectural styles of Tibet, Tang, Nepal and India, and is regarded as a paradigm of Tibetan religious buildings. The temple has four storeys; its golden arch roofs are typical Han architectural features; the decorated columns and towers are Tibetan; the 103 wooden creatures and sphinxes lined under the eaves of the second and the third storeys represent Nepalese and Indian styles. In the temple there is the one-thousand-metre long Tibetan wall-paintings “Princess Wencheng Coming to Tibet” and “Construction of the Jokhang Temple”. There are also two embroidery works of the Escort God Thangka from the Ming Dynasty, which are two of the Vajrayana Buddhas worshipped by the Gelu denomination of the Tibetan Buddhism. All of these are rare and priceless.

The Jokhang Temple Attractions: (none available)

 The Jokhang Temple Stories:

1. Lake reclamation for the construction of the temple

It is said that when the temple was constructed, it experienced serious flood several times. Princess Wencheng offered her explanation for persistent floods. She believed that the entire Tibet Plateau was a Raksasi, a legendry demon, lying on her back. This demon lied with her head towards the east and legs towards the west; the lake by which the Jokhang Temple lies was exactly the position of her heart, and so the lake water was her blood. Therefore, said the Princess, the demon’s heart must be subjugated before the temple could be completed. What is more, she suggested that an extra twelve minor temples be built on different locations so as to suppress the limbs and joints of the demon. So the lake was blocked up with earth carried up to the lake by goats. Afterwards, the Jokhang Temple was built upon the reclaimed land.

Actually, the name of the city Lhasa came from the Jokhang Temple. According to historical records, Lhasa was originally called Rasa. “Ra” means goats, and “sa” means land, together meaning “a place built by goats”. Later, due to the construction of the Buddhist temple, the store of Buddhist statues, scripture, towers and the worship of numerous Buddhist pilgrims, people regard this town as a Buddhist holy land, and renamed it “Lhasa” for “La” means Buddha in Tibetan.

2.  The Jokhang Temple and the Ramoche Temple

The two princesses, Princess Chizun and Princess Wencheng, each brought a precious statue of Sakyamuni as major dowry. Princess Chizun had with her the life-size statue of Sakyamuni of the age of eight, while Princess Wencheng arrived with the life-size statue of Sakyamuni of the age of twelve. The Tibetan people believe that these two statues are the first two that have ever come to the Tiban Plateau. In order to worship them, Sontzen Gampo ordered to build the Jokhang Temple and the Ramoche Temple

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Tsupu Monastery Travel Tips

On August 25, 2011, in Monasteries, Temples, Tibet, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Tsupu Monastery is located in upper reaches of Tsupu River, which is 60 kilometers away from Lhasa. Tsupu Monastery is the main monastery of Tibetan Buddhism Ge Ma Ge Ju sect in Tibet, with a history of 800 years. It is said that this religious sect first created the reincarnation system; from then on, leaders […]

Tsupu Monastery is located in upper reaches of Tsupu River, which is 60 kilometers away from Lhasa. Tsupu Monastery is the main monastery of Tibetan Buddhism Ge Ma Ge Ju sect in Tibet, with a history of 800 years. It is said that this religious sect first created the reincarnation system; from then on, leaders of Tibetan Buddhism began to believe in mysticism. There are a great number of rare cultural relics treasured up in Tsupu Monastery, such as the 16th Karmapa Sariputra. The 16th Karmapa got cremation after achieveing parinirvana abroad and turned to be sariputra, which was brought back to Tsupu Monastery by a living buddha called Zhu Benren Boqie. This sariputra turned into a buddha statue with a height of 0.25 centimeters.

Best time to visit Tsupu Monastery

Lhasa is located in the north of the Himalayas. Affected by the downward flow, the weather is often fine with little rainfall. There is neither severe cold in winter nor intense heat in summer, having the plateau monsoon semiarid climate. The highest temperature is 29 centi degrees while the lowest temperature is subzero 16.5 centi degrees; the yearly average temperature is 7.4 centi degrees. Rainfalls mainly come in July, August and September and the yearly precipitation is about 500 millimeters. The yearly sunshine time is over 3008 hours, which gives Lhasa a name “the city of sunlight”. The best time to visit Lhasa is July, August and September.

Tsupu Monastery Tickets

Opening time: 9:00–14:00

Ticket price: Tibetan people are free of charge while each tourist should pay 40 yuan.

Visiting time: If you arrive at 12:00, two hours are quite enough, but the whole journey takes one day.

How to get to Tsupu Monastery

1. In the western flower nursery of Jokhang Temple, there are midibuses which depart at 7:00-8:00am, cost 15 yuan and return at 15:00. You can also rent a jeep car at Lhasa, which costs 200-300 yuan.

2. No accommodation is provided in Tsupu Monastery, therefore, you’d better not miss the only return bus at 15:00. However, there are many schoolhouses in villages that you can get accommodation along the way back. The scenery is so beautiful on the way that you can try to walk first, and then take free riding to return Lhasa on halfway.

Tsupu Monastery

On August 25, 2011, in Lhasa, Monasteries, Temples, Tibet, by Jack Li

Tsupu Monastery, at an altitude of 4300 meters, is located at the upstream of Tsupu River in the northwest of Duilong Deqing County, which is 60 kilometers to the west of Lhasa. It is about 70 kilometers away from the west countryside of Lhasa, Tibet and it is the main shvine of Gema Geju Sect, […]

Tsupu Monastery, at an altitude of 4300 meters, is located at the upstream of Tsupu River in the northwest of Duilong Deqing County, which is 60 kilometers to the west of Lhasa. It is about 70 kilometers away from the west countryside of Lhasa, Tibet and it is the main shvine of Gema Geju Sect, belonging to Bai Sect, with a history of 800 years. The famous reincarnation system of Tibetan Buddhism that attracts worldwide attention is originated here and later spread by other religious sects of Tibet.

The monastery, sitting on the north and facing the south, is constructed by the first highclerist Dorje Chang in 1189. Once during the vipassana meditation, Dorje Chang realized that Tsupu Monastery was the mandala of Cakrasamvara and anyone who came here would be blessed by Cakrasamvara. After the Cultural Revolution, Tsupu Monastery is reconstructed. There is first Living Buddha of big sect committed by China government, so the monastery develops very fast. Now there are 400 Lama in the monastery.

The large-scale buildings of Tsupu Monastery, centering on the basilica, include scripture hall, chapel, trade khangsar, Buddhism College, private residence for Living Buddhism and monk’s residence. The other buildings are still under reconstruction. There are numerous precious cultural relics. The stele of Jiangpu Monastery in the basilica of Tsupu Monastery is 2.5 meters tall and 0.5 meter wide. The ancient Tibetan carved on the stele is of great historical value to study politics, economy and religion of Tubo. The silver statue built by the eighth Karmapa to worship his guru is the most valuable in the monastery. It is said that the silver statue float in the sky for seven days after accomplishment, so here comes the saying “Buddha in Living in the Sky”. Tsupu Laqian (big Buddha) is six meters high, built by second Karmapa.

Near Tsupu Monastery, there is a spring with clear and sweet water in it, which is formed by Karmapa sticking his crutch to the ground with magical power. Apart from this, the stone statue of Maqia Karmapa, the alms bowl used by Milari Monk and cap used by Dusong Ruanba Monk are all priceless. There are a series of famous sites on the Ji Qinbo Mountain which embraces Tsupu Monastery, such as Zhodo Tidro Hermitage, Retreatant Temple, Biguan Caves of generations of Karmapa and the word “mantra” left by the seventeenth Karmapa on the stone.

Tsupu Monastery Story

  1. The Meaning of Tsupu

There are many explanations of Tsupu, among which there are two clear and standard ones. One has that Tsupu Monastery means Flying Monastery. It is said Tsupu Monastery flies from India. This version is similar to the Flying Peak in Hangzhou, which are both the deified by local residence. Another version in the book Spectacle on Tibetan Culture has that the founder of Tsupu Monastery passed here and considered it as a good place, so he built the monastery and named it “Tsupu” which means “prosperity”. The third version is that long time ago, the Living Buddha of Bon Religion casted spell to hide his incantation underground, which later became the “terma” of Bon Religion. Later the terma exuded into ravines, so here comes the name “Tsupu” meaning “exuding into ravines”.

The Potala Palace Travel Tips

On August 17, 2011, in Lhasa, Palaces, Temples, Tibet, Tours, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Since the Potala Palace was built for religious use, there are some religious taboos in the palace. For example, it is forbidden for tourists to wear a hat, or take pictures, or step on thresholds in the palace. Tourists are not allow to stay in the palace, and are required to finish their visit within […]

Since the Potala Palace was built for religious use, there are some religious taboos in the palace. For example, it is forbidden for tourists to wear a hat, or take pictures, or step on thresholds in the palace. Tourists are not allow to stay in the palace, and are required to finish their visit within one hour. The palace is located on the mountainside, and it is relatively cold inside. You’d better take an extra coat with you and walk slowly during your visit. You can take photos with the overview of the Potala Palace on the Medicine King Hill to the southwest of the palace. You can easily reach the hill if you leave the palace from its west gate, and go along the path to its main entrance. It takes you 1 or 2 Yuan to take photos on the hill.

Best season to visit the Potala Palace

Lhasa is located in central Tibet with a very high altitude. It is called “the City of Sunlight” because the annual sunshine duration there is more than 3000 hours. The rainy seasons of Lhasa are from June to September, with an annual precipitation between 200 to 510 mm. The maximum temperature there can reach 28 ℃, while the minimum can be as low as -14℃. The temperature difference between day and night are very large.The air is thin, and there are many windy days during the year. The winter and spring in Lhasa are quite dry. Relatively speaking, it is comfortable to visit Lhasa from March to October. It is highly advisable the schedule your trip after May.

The Potala Palace Travel Route

The East Courtyard—The Gallery of the White Palace—The East Youjiyuanman Hall—The Sunlight Hall—The Hall of Maitreya—The Golden Top—The Tancheng Hall—The Shushengsanjie Hall—The Longevity Hall—The Stupa Hall of the 13th Dalai Lama—The Shangshi Hall—The Stupa Hall of the 7th Dalai Lama—The Hall of Guanyin—The Stupa Hall of the 8th Dalai Lama—The The Stupa Hall of the 9th Dalai Lama—The Shilun Hall—The Hall of Amitayus Buddha—The Fawang Cave—The Puxianzhuisui Hall—The Xiangluo Hall—The Gallery of the Red Palace—The West Youjiyuanman Hall—The Putidaocidi Hall—The Chiming Hall—the Stupa Hall of the 5th Dalai Lama—The Shixi Hall

The Potala Palace Ticket

Ticket for the Potala Palace:

RMB 200 per person in peak seasons (from May 1st to October 31th )

RMB 100 per person in slack season (from December 1st to April the 30th next year)

Ticket for the Golden Top: RMB 10 per person

Ticket for the Jewelry Show: RMB 10 per person

Ticket fot the Stupa Halls: RMB 10 per person

It is free of charge to visit the City of Snow beside the Potala Palace.

Openning Hours: 9:00 to 16:00 (Except for holidays or festivals, or the day when there are grand religious ceremonies held in the palace)

Notice: The Potala Palace sells only 2300 tickets a day. In peak seasons, you need to book the ticket at the West Gate of the palace one day earlier, and arrive at the palace twenty minutes earlier than the time on the ticket the next day.

How to get to the Potala Palace

By air

There is an airport located 100 kilometers away to the south of Lhasa. Tourists can fly to the airport from citis like Beijing, Shanhai, and Katmandu, and take a bus or a taxi to the city of Lhasa. It takes 2 hours to reach the city by bus, and the ticket price is 20 Yuan per person. You can also take a taxi, and the price will be 150~250 Yuan per ride.

By Coach

You can take a couch from Bayi, Changdu, Chengdu, Rikaze, Zhangmu, Jiangzi, or Geermu, and arrived at the Coach Station of Lhasa. The following is a list of ticket price.

Ticket price from Geermu to Lhasa: RMB 262 per person

Ticket price from Zedang to Lhasa: RMB 28 per person.

Ticket price from Changdu to Lhasa: RMB 228 per person

Ticket price from Chengdu to Lhasa: RMB 443 per person

Ticket price from Rikaze to Lhasa: RMB 40 per person

Ticket price from Zhangmu to Lhasa: RMB 113 per person

Ticket price from Jiangzi to Lhasa: RMB 38 per person

Transportation Inside the City of Lhasa

Although Lhasa is not a big city, the transportation system of the city is very well developed. There are more than 1500 taxis in the city. You can easily find one whenever you want to take taxi. It takes no more than ten Yuan to travel around the city by taxi.

It is also very convinient to take a minibus to the Potala Palace. The ticket price is 2 Yuan per person. You can take a bus, too.  The ticket price for bus is 10 Yuan per person.

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The Potala Palace Museum

On August 17, 2011, in Lhasa, Museums, Palaces, Tibet, by Jack Li

The Potala Palace Museum is located in the City of Snow on the foot of the Potala Palace. It is a three-floor building with a floor area of around 2000 square meters. Local government has spent more than 10 million on establishing the museum. It was not open to public until 2009. The whole museum […]

The Potala Palace Museum is located in the City of Snow on the foot of the Potala Palace. It is a three-floor building with a floor area of around 2000 square meters. Local government has spent more than 10 million on establishing the museum. It was not open to public until 2009.

The whole museum can be divided into 8 sections, with more than 200 invaluable cultural relics and their photos inside. Most of the relics displayed in the museum were from the Ming and the Qing Dynasty, for example, the Tibetan Buddhist scriptures.

You can see palm-leaf scripture from the 9th century, the white pottery bowl with classical patterns on it from the 12th century, the bronzen statue of King Kong from the 14th century, the agate cup from the 17th century, and the snuff bottle from the 18th century. There are also many precious ancient documents preserved in the museum, for example, the imperial edicts of the emperors in the Qing Dynasty. Visiting the museum is one of the best ways to gain a basic understanding of the Tibeten culture.

The Potala Palace

The Red Palace

On August 17, 2011, in Lhasa, Monasteries, Palaces, Temples, Tibet, by Jack Li

The Red Palace was located at the center of the Potala Palace. It was named “the Red Palace” because the outer walls of the palace were all painted red. The layout of the palace lies in the formation of Mandala. The main buildings in the palace are the Stupa Halls of Dalai Lama. In total, […]

The Red Palace was located at the center of the Potala Palace. It was named “the Red Palace” because the outer walls of the palace were all painted red. The layout of the palace lies in the formation of Mandala. The main buildings in the palace are the Stupa Halls of Dalai Lama. In total, there are eight Stupa Halls within the palace, where generations of Dalai Lama’s bodies were preserved. Many small scripture halls were dotted among the Stupa Halls, such as the Shangshi Hall, the Xiangtong Hall, and the Shixi Hall.

The west part of the Red Palace is the Jiyuanman Hall. It is the Stupa Hall of the fifth Dalai Lama. The Jiyuanman Hall is the largest Hall in the Potala Palace, covering an area of 725 square meters. You can see marvelous frescos on the wall of the hall. The most famous among them must be the one picturing the fifth Dalai Lama meeting Emperor Shunzhi of the Qing Dynasty. There is a Dalai Lama’s throne in the hall, with a big plaque saying “the place where lotus blossoms” above it. The inscription on the plaque is written by Emperor Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty.

The Fawang Cave in here is one of the earliest buildings in the Potala Palace. There are statues of Sontzen Gampo, Princess Wencheng, Princess Chizun, and Ludongzan in the cave. These exquisite statues are invaluable relics now.

The Sushengsanjie Hall is the highest hall in the Red Palace. Inside the hall, you can see a portrait of Emperor Qianlong and an elegant eleven faces Guanyin made of silver. The hall is the Stupa Hall of the 13th Dalai Lama. Established in 1933, it is the latest building in the Potala Palace.

The Potala Palace

The White Palace

On August 17, 2011, in Lhasa, Monasteries, Temples, Tibet, by Jack Li

The White Palace is one of the major buildings inside the Potala Palace. It used to be the residence of Dalai Lama, the supreme religious leaders of Tibet. The seven-floor mansion was named “the White Palace” because its outer walls were all painted white. The top floor of the palace is the Sunlight Hall, which […]

The White Palace is one of the major buildings inside the Potala Palace. It used to be the residence of Dalai Lama, the supreme religious leaders of Tibet. The seven-floor mansion was named “the White Palace” because its outer walls were all painted white. The top floor of the palace is the Sunlight Hall, which once was Dalai Lama’s bedroom and study. In ancient Tibet, only high-ranking lamas were allowed to visit the hall. The layout of the hall can be divided into two parts, the West Sunlight Hall and the East Sunlight Hall. The West Sunlight Hall was built during the construction of the Potala Palace, while the East Sunlight Hall was established later in replication of it. Part of the roof of the Sunlight Hall is retractable so that duiring the day time, sunlight can enter the hall. That is why the hall was called “the Sunlight Hall”. The opening roof would be covered by tarpaulin during the night.

The fifth and sixth floors of the White Palace were the place where Dalai Lama handled offical business. The forth floor, the Yudong Hall, is the largest hall in the White Palace, with a length of 27.8 meters and a width of 25.8 meters. Dalai Lama’s throne is placed in the hall, with a big plaque saying “prosper the borderarea of China” above it. The inscription on the plaque is written by Emperor Tongzhi of the Qing Dynasty. Grand ceremonies, for example,   coronation, were held there.

In addition, there is a hill in front of the White Palace, with a large square on its mountainside. The square is called the Deyang Square. It was the place where Dalai Lama used to enjoy theatre performances and held outdoor activities. And to the south and north of the square, there are schools for lamas. The weather-beaten White Palace welcomes a great many of visitors everyday.

The Potala Palace

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