The temple of Heaven

On August 6, 2012, in Beijing, More Places of Interest, Parks & Gardens, Temples, by Jack Li

One of the most emblematic places you can see in your Beijing Tour is the Temple of Heaven. Situated on the south-east of the city and with more than 600 years of history and is a must-see in your Bejing tour. The temple of Heaven was created between 1406 and 1420 by the emperor Yongle […]

One of the most emblematic places you can see in your Beijing Tour is the Temple of Heaven. Situated on the south-east of the city and with more than 600 years of history and is a must-see in your Bejing tour.

The temple of Heaven was created between 1406 and 1420 by the emperor Yongle (the same that created the Forbidden City) but it was extended on the 16th century.

The temple was repeatedly occupied during wars, but finally it was completely restored and considered a UNESCO World Heritage site and the surroundings are considered now a good park for exercise.

Basically there is three parts of the Temple of Heaven that are singular and that you can visit and are the places that have been considered the most important:

–          The Hall of Prayers for Good Harvests; it’s a triple gabled circular building who is 38 meters tall and 36 meters in diameter, it has three marble-stoned levels and that was the place where the emperor held his prayers for good harvests, it’s constructed entirely in wood and it was struck by lightning in 1889, what you see is a reconstruction from several years later.

–          The Imperial Vault of Heaven; is a circular building with one gable built on only one level of stone, it’s located in the south of the Hall of Prayers for Good Harvests and its quite similar but smaller. It’s surrounded by a wall called the Echo Wall that can transmit sound trough great distances. If you hit it the sound can be heard in the other side of the wall. To go from the Hall to the Vault you have to pass through the Vermillion Steps Bridge, a 360 meters long walkaway that ascends from one place to the other.

–          The Circular Mound Altar; Located south of the Vault of Heaven is a circular platform with three levels of marble decorated with dragons, everything in the Altar is represented nine times or its multiple, the dragons, the steps the stairs…  The center of the altar is a round stone called the Hearth of Heaven or the Supreme Yang, it was there where the Emperor stood and prayed for the good weather.

Except from that in the Temple of Heaven you can find also the Palace of Abstinence, the Flower garden and the Stone garden.

All in all the Temple of Heaven is a place you have to visit in your Beijing Tour so make sure to allow half a day at least to go there (or even a day if you feel like wandering in the Park!) whatever you do don’t miss this magnificent temple

Tagged with:  

Temple of Heaven

On June 11, 2012, in Beijing, Cool Places, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, by Jack Li

Situated in the Southeast area of Beijing, the Temple of Heaven is a complex of religious buildings used for annual ceremonies to pray to heaven for good harvest as well as for sacrificial ceremonies. The temple was completed in 1420 during the Ming Dynasty and remained in use for several dynasties afterward. It was used […]

Situated in the Southeast area of Beijing, the Temple of Heaven is a complex of religious buildings used for annual ceremonies to pray to heaven for good harvest as well as for sacrificial ceremonies. The temple was completed in 1420 during the Ming Dynasty and remained in use for several dynasties afterward. It was used for ritual ceremonies until about 1914, which was when it was opened as a museum to the public. The Temple of Heaven is one of the largest existing complexes of sacrificial buildings and is easily one of the most intricately painted buildings I have ever come across. If you ever have the ability to travel to Beijing, visiting the Temple of Heaven is a definite must, which can easily be arranged through a Beijing Tour site.

After getting off the subway at Tiantan Dongmen Station, the Temple of Heaven is about a five minute walk and is also conveniently located near the Pearl Market. I was easily able to visit both attractions in the same day, which is ideal for those who have a limited amount of time to spend in the city. Upon arriving at the temple there are several ticket options available. You have the ability to buy an “entrance ticket” or a “through ticket,” which is the ticket option I would recommend. Buying the “through ticket” allows you to actually get a closer look at the temple and the difference in price is only about 20 rmb. Having the ability to approach the temple is worth the difference in price for it allows you to look inside the temple and to get a better look at the construction of the temple as well as the artistic intricacies.

Once inside the area, the first thing I immediately noticed was how vast the area seemed to be. The area surrounding the temple is filled with beautiful vegetation that causes you to feel as if you are no longer in the city of Beijing, but instead in a park with fresh air and plenty of trees. While I was visiting the area, I was fortunate enough to witness a band playing in the park area. They were surrounded by a large group of people, all of whom were thoroughly enjoying the authentic Chinese music. After walking a ways farther, I eventually reached the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest, which consists of three tiers representing Man, Earth, and Heaven. This was the grandest of the sights to see in the area, but there are other sections consisting of the Circular Mound Altar, which is the altar proper, as well as the Imperial Vault of Heaven, which is a smaller replica of the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest.

Although I only spent a limited amount of time in the Temple of Heaven, spending an entire day there would be an easy feat. In order to get the most out of the experience, Beijing tours are recommended. Going in blindly without understanding all of the symbolism present undermines the experience. Traveling to the Temple of Heaven was a memorable experience and I feel very fortunate to have had the opportunity to experience some of China’s rich history.

 

Echoes from the Temple

On April 11, 2012, in Beijing, Must-sees, Temples, by Jack Li

Why not indulge your spiritual side for a few hours at the Temple of Heaven (‘tiantan’). The Temple of Heaven (the Temple) claims to possess both the most famous temple (The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests) and the largest heaven worship architectural complex in the world. Initially constructed under the reign of Emperor Yongle […]

Why not indulge your spiritual side for a few hours at the Temple of Heaven (‘tiantan’). The Temple of Heaven (the Temple) claims to possess both the most famous temple (The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests) and the largest heaven worship architectural complex in the world. Initially constructed under the reign of Emperor Yongle (1420), The Temple is most famous for practicing Taoism, but the site has also been used for other ancient beliefs to encourage abundant harvests. These reasons alone should convince any traveller that this place is an obvious stop-off on a Beijing Tours route with some excellent China Hotels nearby.

In days gone by, emperors would enter the Temple from the Forbidden City via the South Gate Street, cross the Heavenly Bridge through the streets and then reach the restricted area of the Temple. Nowadays, anybody can access the complex. The most recognised attractions are the The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest (The Hall), The Circular Mound Altar and the Echo Wall. The Hall itself sits on three layers of a white marble altar with the diameter of the bottom layer being 91 metres and The Hall standing at 32 metres high. Around The Hall visitors will have a splendid location to take photos and admire the views over Beijing city. At the back of the Imperial Vault of Heaven is the Echo Wall (or ‘Sound Spreading Wall’). The theory dictates that when people face north and speak towards the wall, the sound waves will echo and spread. The sound is meant to be so clear from one part of the wall to another that it is apparently like speaking on the telephone. If you want to see if this works, then you can visit the Wall and try this out with a friend. Another activity to try is standing on the ‘Heavenly Centre Stone’ on top of The Circular Mound Altar. Here, it is said that people are able to listen to the divine heavens.

Despite being a holy site, visiting the Temple does not have to be a serious affair. This is largely due to the fact that the temple complex encompasses an area of 273 hectares, which in turn also acts as a park for local Beijiners. Amongst other things, the Temple complex provides quite a lively and interactive atmosphere. Upon entering the Temple grounds, for instance, you will be met by avenues of ancient cypress trees. These trees certainly stimulate the imagination as they twist in many directions. One particular tree is called the ‘Wentian Cypress’ and has a branch which points towards the sky which has been interpreted as an interrogation towards the heaven. The relaxed environment around the park is also noticeable by the very fact that locals (and foreigners alike) can be seen playing games together (such as skipping and cards). The park is also a place to buy souvenirs such as shawls from local sellers. When buying tickets at the entrance to the complex, there is the option of purchasing an artistic guide around the Temple of Heaven. The guide costs 10RMB, but it provides a fair amount of information about the place and is also a great souvenir!

Access to the Temple of Heaven can be reached from the park’s East Gate at Tiantan Dongmen Station via subway line 5. In addition, note that there are separate admission fees depending on your china travel visit to the Temple.

The Temple of Heaven

On November 3, 2011, in Beijing, Cool Places, Historical Relics, Temples, by Jack Li

If you are the kind of person who likes saving money on interesting attractions then on your next China Tour make sure you see the Temple of Heaven. From April 1 to October 31 its cost 15RMBs, through November to March it only cost 10RMBs. Temple of Heaven is located in Beijing. So when you […]

If you are the kind of person who likes saving money on interesting attractions then on your next China Tour make sure you see the Temple of Heaven. From April 1 to October 31 its cost 15RMBs, through November to March it only cost 10RMBs. Temple of Heaven is located in Beijing. So when you travel to Beijing and want to save money then make sure you visit the Temple of Heaven.

The Temple of Heaven is 3X bigger than the Forbidden City and smaller than the Summer Palace. Emperors believed that they were the Sons of Heaven so they dared not build the Forbidden City bigger then the Temple of Heaven. The Temple was built so the Emperors had a place where they could pray to the heavens and offer up sacrifices. Prayers were offered in the spring so the people could have a good harvest. During the winter solstice offering were made to heaven. 

Temple of Heaven was built in 1429 during the Ming Dynasty. The area of the Temple is 66.7 acres. When the builders where building the temple they built it high and round, because the people believed that Heaven was round and earth was square. There are three principle building which are ‘Altar of Prayer For Good Harvests’, ‘Imperial Vault of Heaven’ and ‘Circular Mound Altar.

Alter of Prayer for Good Harvest is 124 feet in height and 98 feet in long. It stands on a round foundation and has three levels made out of marble stones. It has a bright blue tile roofs. An interesting fact about the temple is that it has no nail employed. The Imperial Vault of Heaven looks like a blue umbrella when standing far away from it. The structure is smaller then the Prayer for Good Harvest. Vault of Heaven is made out of bricks and timber. Emperors used the Vault to place the memorial tablets of the Gods there.

Circular Altar has three layered terraces also made out of white marble. The Circular Mount Altar was used by the emperors to pray to heaven. The Ming and Qing emperors would offer sacrifices to Heaven on the day of the winter solstice each year. The ceremony would thank the heavens for the blessing that they received and to hope that they future would be just as good. In the middle of the Circular Mount Altar lies a round stone called the Center of Heaven Stone. The stone echoes when a visitors speaks loudly when  standing on or by the stone.

When you are walking around you need to notice how many times you can see the number 3 and 9 being used around the Temple grounds. Three and nine are lucky numbers in Chinese numerology. Nine is meaning the highest value digit and is associated with the emperor. Nine square root is three. Three is significant to the natural terms- Beginning-middle-end or introduction-development-conclusion.  

These three main attractions are surrounded by trees and gardens. Some of the trees are over 100 years old. While you are enjoying your stroll around the garden you can see people practicing tai chi or playing instruments or board games. Other people will be singing or dancing or just simply flying a kite.

The Temple of Heaven Opens at 6am and closes at 8pm. From 8:30-4:30 is when the temple is open.  If you would like to see the cultural side of China during your Beijing tour then the Temple of Heaven is what you want to see. The Temple of Heaven is a great way to save money and to see something interesting.

Temple of Heaven Travel Tips

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, More Places of Interest, Travel Info, by Jack Li

The Temple of Heaven is located on the east side of the Yongdingmengnei Street, Chongwen District. The Temple of Heaven is the place where ancient Chinese emperors held ceremonies to worship heaven. It started to be built in 1420 (Ming Dynasty) and completed in the Qing Dynasty. It covers 2,730,000 m2 with main buildings like […]

The Temple of Heaven is located on the east side of the Yongdingmengnei Street, Chongwen District. The Temple of Heaven is the place where ancient Chinese emperors held ceremonies to worship heaven. It started to be built in 1420 (Ming Dynasty) and completed in the Qing Dynasty. It covers 2,730,000 m2 with main buildings like The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest, Circular Mound Altar, the Imperial Vault of Heaven, the Hall of Abstinence, the Office of Devine Music and the Imperial Stable. It opened as a public park in 1918.

Best time to visit Temple of Heaven

All year round

Temple of Heaven tickets

Tickets Price (Yuan)
Off season Peak season
Entrance ticket 10 15
Half price entrance ticket 5 8
Full-access ticket 30 35
Attractions Hall of Abstinence& Office of Devine Music 10 10
Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest& Circular Mound Altar

& Echo Wall

20 20
Monthly pass 15 15

Notice:

  1. Free: children under 1.2m
  2. Free: on Children’s Day for kindergarten and elementary school children. Teachers of the groups are free if the number of the teachers is less than 10% of the students (Attractions not included).
  3. Free: disabled, veterans, servicemen, retired cadres, model worker above provincial level, Beijing Garden Inspectors, Association of Landscape members (Attractions not included).
  4. Half price: middle school and college students, international students except students from adult education programs (Attractions not included)
  5. Half price: group visit on Women’s Day and Youth Day with company warrant (Attractions not included)
  6. Half Price: 70+ seniors (Attractions not included)

How to get to Temple of Heaven

The east gate:

Bus 6, 34, 35, 36, 39,41, 43, 60, 116, 610, 707, 723, 743, 958, 957 at East gate of Temple of Heaven Station

The south gate:

Bus 36 (loop line), 53, 120, 122, 525, 610, 800, 803, 958 at South gate of Temple of Heaven Station

The west gate:

Bus 2, 7, 15, 69, 17, 20, 105, 707, 729, 826 at West gate of Temple of Heaven Station

The north gate

Bus 6, 34, 35, 36 (loop line), 110, 106, 687, 707, 743 at North gate of Temple of Heaven Station

Circular Mound Altar and The Echo Wall

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, by Jack Li

Circular Mound Altar: The Circular Mound Altar embodies the roundness of heaven in. There are three layers of altar with one is bigger than the other from bottom to top. The total height is 5.17m while the biggest altar measures 54.92m in diameter and the smallest 23.65m in diameter. Each layer is nine steps higher […]

Circular Mound Altar:

The Circular Mound Altar embodies the roundness of heaven in. There are three layers of altar with one is bigger than the other from bottom to top. The total height is 5.17m while the biggest altar measures 54.92m in diameter and the smallest 23.65m in diameter. Each layer is nine steps higher than the one on its top. At the center of the top altar is a cobblestone plate encircled by nine laps of fan shaped marble slabs. The number of marble stones in each circle is nine or multiples of nine, also the railing boards and balustrades for ancient Chinese consider nine as a heaven number.

The Echo Wall:

The Imperial Vault of Heaven, made of brick and timber, is 19 meters high and 15.6 meters in diameter. It is surrounded by a circular wall of polished brick with an opening to the south. This is known as the Echo Wall and is 3.72 meters high, 61.5 meters in diameter and 193 meters in circumference. If a person whispers close to the wall at any point, his voice can be heard distinctly at any other point along the wall. This is possible because the wall is round and hermetically constructed with smooth, solid bricks.

Temple of Heaven

The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest

On August 26, 2011, in China Attractions, Historical Relics, by Jack Li

The temple’s main building is the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests, where the emperor prayed for a bountiful crop each year. The round hall, 38 meters high and 30 meters in diameter, has triple eaves and a blue, cone-shaped tile roof crowned with a gilded knob. Surrounding the hall is a 6 meter high […]

The temple’s main building is the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests, where the emperor prayed for a bountiful crop each year. The round hall, 38 meters high and 30 meters in diameter, has triple eaves and a blue, cone-shaped tile roof crowned with a gilded knob. Surrounding the hall is a 6 meter high circular stone terrace with three levels, each edged with a balustrade of carved white marble. Without the use of steel, cement, nail, or even big beams and crossbeams, the entire structure is supported by 28 massive wooden pillars and a number of bars, laths, joints and rafters. The furnishings within the hall are still in their original positions from Emperor Xianfeng’s era. In the forefront and above the throne are tablets enshrined in honor of Heaven. On either table on each side are tablets of the emperor’s ancestors. Each tablet is fronted by an altar. A total of 24 kinds of offering were made on the altar, including soup, wine, assorted grains, and calf. The feudal monarchs and their sacrificial rites have long vanished into history. However, this group of magnificent and lofty structures stands as a fine testament to the ingenuity of the ancient Chinese and a piece of mankind’s cultural heritage.

Temple of Heaven

The Hall of Imperial Zenith

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, by Jack Li

The Hall of Imperial Zenith, with various memorial tablets of God kept in house-like shrines, is a place for emperors to pray for good harvests. Built in 1420 (18th year of Ming Emperor Yongle’s reign), this hall is to the north of the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest. With a tricolored glazed door leading […]

The Hall of Imperial Zenith, with various memorial tablets of God kept in house-like shrines, is a place for emperors to pray for good harvests. Built in 1420 (18th year of Ming Emperor Yongle’s reign), this hall is to the north of the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest. With a tricolored glazed door leading to an altar surrounded by stone balustrade, the hall was built with blue glazed roof tiles. The platform in front of the hall has eight steps on each of its three sides. Guxi Gate stands in the west part of the courtyard. The plaque inscribed with Chinese characters—Huangqidian—were written by Ming Emperor Jiajing.

Historically, on the first and the fifteenth day of each lunar calendar month, the officer in charge of the worship ceremony would send his men in to clean the hall and burn incense. One day before the ceremony, the emperor would finish the worship process. Then, the Director of the Board of Rites would go on to worship God, and the officer in charge of the ceremony would move the memorial tablets of God to the double-dragon pavilion. Finally, the imperial guards would place them in the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest.

Temple of Heaven

Temple of Heaven

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Must-sees, by Jack Li

Covering a total area of 273 hectares, the Temple of Heaven was a place for the Ming and Qing emperors to “worship God” and “pray for good harvests” in the downtown area outside of Zhengyangmen. It is round in the north and square in the south, reflecting an ancient Chinese belief that “heaven is round […]

Covering a total area of 273 hectares, the Temple of Heaven was a place for the Ming and Qing emperors to “worship God” and “pray for good harvests” in the downtown area outside of Zhengyangmen. It is round in the north and square in the south, reflecting an ancient Chinese belief that “heaven is round and earth is square.” Two rounds of altar wall around the temple divide it into two parts with the inner altar containing most of the buildings.

To elaborate, a wall splits the inner altar into two sections. The northern part is the Altar of Prayer for Grain, used in spring to pray for a year of good harvests. The center here is the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest. The southern section houses the Circular Mound Altar, serving as the location on the winter solstice. The main building is a giant round stone platform called the Circular Mound. Measuring 360 m in length, the paved path above ground known as Dan Bi Bridge connects the two altars. All the constructions mentioned above form a 1,200 m long axis with ancient cypresses lining each side.

Inside Xitianmen, the Hall of Abstinence was built to the south for emperors to live in before praying. The exterior altar area includes the Office of Divine Music, the department in charge of teaching dance and performing during the worship ceremonies. The major attractions in the Temple of Heaven are as follows: the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest, the Hall of Imperial Zenith, the Circular Mound Altar, the Imperial Vault of Heaven, the Hall of Abstinence, the Wanshou Pavilion, and the Echo Wall.

The construction of the Temple of Heaven began in 1420 (Emperor Yongle’s 18th year, Ming Dynasty). After that, the magnificent temple was enlarged and renovated by Ming Emperor Jiajing and Qing Emperor Qianlong. After the founding of the People’s Republic of China, the government devoted funds to protecting and maintaining the antiques in the Temple of Heaven. Its rich cultural connections and distinct architectural style make this weather-beaten temple a symbol of ancient Eastern culture.

Being the largest as well as the oldest architectural complex in the world, the Temple of Heaven was designated an important heritage site under state protection in 1961 and was recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1998.

The Temple of Heaven Attractions:

The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest

The Hall of Imperial Zenith

The Circular Mound Altar and The Echo Wall

The Temple of Heaven Story:

1.   Guxi Gate (meaning: Gate of the Septuagenarian)

Guxi Gate stands at the south-west corner in the Hall of Imperial Zenith. In the 46th year of Qing Emperor Qianlong’s reign, the emperor was already aged over 70. The elaborate formalities of worship ceremonies were taking their toll on his strength. To shorten the trip to the Hall of Imperial Zenith, the place was relocated to just outside the west wall of the hall. The emperor provided an explanation of his action in an imperial edict: “Since ascending the throne 46 years ago, I have always participated in the worship ceremony in person every time. Thanks to God, I have been blessed with a long life-span of over 70 years. However, I am no longer quite as strong as before; the trip to the Hall of Imperial Zenith fatigues me. In addition, I do not intend to allow my ministers assume the duty for me. Therefore, I hereby declare that the place of worship be moved to the outside of the hall’s west wall for convenience’s sake. If my descendants are also granted by God a long life like my own, they may also follow my example.” And so, the name of Guxi Gate comes from this story of the old emperor.

2.   Huajia Gate (meaning: Gate of the Sexagenarian)

Huajia Gate refers to a door to the west of Dan Bi Bridge, located outside the South Brick Door of The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest. Legend has it that when Qing Emperor Qianlong came to the Temple of Heaven to pray when he was sixty years old, he did not dismount the imperial carriage until he reached this gate so as to spare himself the walk. After that, he went to the Hall of Imperial Zenith and the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvest to finish the worship process by burning incense and using other sacrificial tools. Huajia Gate came into existence for this reason.

3.   Nine-dragon Cypress

This Nine-dragon Cypress is over 500 years old. With a gigantic straight trunk, the tree is famous for its deep ridged bark, distinguishing it from other old cypresses. The bark of the trunk is strangely full of rivulets, intertwined like nine dragons flying around the cypress. It is the symbol of “nine dragons welcoming God.” People say this old cypress by the road was waiting for the emperor to pass by, but now it is here to welcome visitors from all over the world.

Temple of Heaven

On November 9, 2010, in Beijing, Cool Places, Must-sees, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Over the weekend, I visited the Temple of Heaven in Beijing. It was an early start as me and friends initially planned to visit many other attractions on Sunday but with limited time and energy we decided only to see the Temple of Heaven this day. Using the subway as a means of transport, we […]

Over the weekend, I visited the Temple of Heaven in Beijing. It was an early start as me and friends initially planned to visit many other attractions on Sunday but with limited time and energy we decided only to see the Temple of Heaven this day. Using the subway as a means of transport, we got our destination in no time and surprisingly it was a lot easier to find than other places in Beijing. The entrance was huge and I could just about see the Temple in the far distance, it was going to be a long walk. When visiting the Temple of Heaven, I would recommend you use China Tours to help you get there and give you a guided tour around the Temple. There is so much history here and would be more beneficial for you to have a tour guide informing you as you go along. I would also recommend China Hotels to book a room nearer to the main hot spots in Beijing so your days are well spent and not travelling far distances to and from attractions.

Temple of Heaven

When walking towards the Temple, we could hear some sort of music playing further ahead of us. To our surprise there were hundreds of people dancing to music like a party. It was quite a shock at first to see so many people boogieing in the middle of a park, but as the music took over, we all decided to join in and break some moves as well! This was a lot of fun and woke me up as it was still early morning. I was not expecting to bust a move at the Temple of Heaven.

Dancing at the Temple of Heaven

Moving along down the pathways towards the Temple, we entered through a gateway and had made it to the heavenly temple. A huge structure stood in front of us that took you back at first. We climbed the staircases up to the top of the temple where a huge shrine rested and I took pictures of it. It is impressive to see the detail involved in constructing the Temple as every inch is either sculpted or coloured on with patterns.

With the endless amount of pictures we had taken we decided to see the rest of the park. There were more smaller temples, sacred shrines, and scenery, it took a lot of out of us during this long walk and we decided to find a place to eat. We found what looked like a small Chinese shop that sold hot food, we could tell because there was a man in a chef’s outfit standing outside making some form of small wraps, so we went in. The reality of it was, we had no idea what we ordered to eat, it was simply a case of pointing at something and hopefully some form of language barrier was broken, luckily for us, it did. The food came out and it was very good, so we ordered more. After our snack, we took off to find a train station and by this time we were too far away from our original station so we had to look for another one near us. As we walked around, we stopped as my friend Petr found a chestnut stall in the street. There was a young Chinese youngster who was running around it and wanted to play with us. As we waited for the chestnuts to be warmed up, the little kid loved my other friend TJ, probably due to his blonde head. The kid gave him a stall to sit on, gave him a biscuit, and was doing high fives. It seemed like they were having a full conversation in English and Mandarin, it was very amusing for us as we couldn’t believe this would have happened at a chestnut stall in the middle of Beijing. It really is full of surprises sometimes and you never really know what’s around the corner and most of the time, it’s something pretty impressive. As we ventured off along the busy streets of Beijing, we finally found a train station and made our way home. What an eventful and interesting day it was.

It’s not hard for you to have the same experience here in Beijing, you simply just have to come and see for yourself. You’ll find yourself emerged in a place of mystery, cultural elegance, and spontaneity. To make the most out of your trip, booking with China Travel can help give you an experience of a lifetime, so don’t hesitate to make one of the best decisions of your life.

Page 1 of 212
deeply.xyz - For Sale | Undeveloped

The domain name
deeply.xyz
is for sale!

DNListed by

$1,495.00

deeply.xyz

$1,495.00

VAT 0%
Learn more

$0.00

Total

$1,495.00

icon

Prefer monthly payments?
Learn more

$124.58/mo.
Protection

Covered by our Buyer Protection Program

Learn more

Fast

Get this domain in less than 24 hours

Learn more

Safe

Safe payments by Adyen

Learn more

Popular domains from this seller

DN

DNGear

Member since 2016-02-12