Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring… and The Palace

On April 12, 2012, in Historical Relics, Temples, Tours, Towers, Pagodas & Grottoes, by Jack Li

There are some highlights on your travel to Beijing which should not be missed. ‘Yiheyuan’ or The Summer Palace (The Palace) is no exception. In order to truly appreciate what The Palace has to offer, be prepared to allocate a large proportion of your day there. This becomes evident when considering that the grounds of […]

There are some highlights on your travel to Beijing which should not be missed. ‘Yiheyuan’ or The Summer Palace (The Palace) is no exception. In order to truly appreciate what The Palace has to offer, be prepared to allocate a large proportion of your day there. This becomes evident when considering that the grounds of The Palace spans 290 hectares. Furthermore, pay attention to some of the Beijing Tours on offer as this could make your visit less bothersome.One of the most convenient ways to reach The Palace is by getting off at Beigongmen (North Palace Gate of the Summer Palace). Alternatively, go to Xiyuan Sation, exit C, and walk west.

The Palace is rather expansive, so as a tourist, it would be worth considering buying a map at the ticket office, an audio guide or look for an English-speaking tour guide. From experience, English-speaking tour guides can be found outside the entrance gate of The Palace. It is best to be safe and ensure that your tour guide appears official (such as carrying a professional badge) and that you negotiate a price before and agreement. A tour guide may typically charge in the region of 100RMB, so splitting the cost within a group doesn’t seem quite so bad.

The conception to build The Palace came from Emperor Qianlong’s insistence to celebrate his mother’s sixtieth birthday in 1750. This
may have seemed extravagant; however, The Palace has been well-used and revered ever since with two major reconstruction projects taking place after foreign-led forces destroyed much of the palace in both 1860 and 1900. In 1886 Empress Dowager Cixi, for example, forwent many of the country’s navy funds into rebuilding The Palace.

In spite of its name, the multifaceted character of The ‘Summer’ Palace makes it an appealing location to visit in any season.  In the winter, for instance, some daring people have been known to walk on the thick, iced-over Kunming Lake (this is not particularly advisable). Whilst towards the warmer months, Lake Kunming allows tourists to take leisurely paddle boats rides. Secluded from hustle and bustle the rest of Beijing, it is understandable why Empress Dowager Cixi was adamant in restoring The Palace as a place in which to retreat. Since 1924, The Palace has welcomed the general public to enter its grounds and today The Palace serves as a historical hotspot and as a recreational park.

The Palace certainly has its fair share of history which can be felt at every twist and turn along its extensive paths. In 1998, the Palace was proudly placed on the World Heritage List by the United Nations after it was given official recognition for its outstanding architecture, preservation and beauty. One feature of this list which is particularly interesting and entered in the Guinness Book of Records is the Long Corridor. Constructed in the mid-18th century, with over 14,000 paintings and stretching 782 metres this stunning walkway expresses much of China’s cultural past showing tales such as that of the infamous ‘Monkey King’.

To assist with your China travel plans, here are some of the essential must-see attractions of The Palace. If you decide to go to the waterways around Suzhou Street, note that your tour guide may not be able to accompany you. Yet this section provides a fascinating insight into what life at The Palace may have been like, with numerous (64 to be exact) small shops. The wonderfully designed Marble Boat is another must-see attraction. Despite being a ‘boat’ made of stone, it nevertheless symbolises the resilience of China (and coincidentally, The Palace). Finally, at a staggering 41 metres in height, try to aim to visit the Tower of the Fragrance of the Buddha. This structure is the pinnacle of The Palace and it is said that reaching the top increases your longevity!

The Largest Royal Park in China- Summer Palace- Yiheyuan

On October 13, 2011, in Beijing, Summer Palace, by Jack Li

China travels can lead you to great places. These great places will show you created looking gardens, corridors, towers and pavilions that date back 1,000 or more years ago. China will also show you very old structures that Emperors and Empress used to reside in. One of these great places is the Summer Palace. So […]

China travels can lead you to great places. These great places will show you created looking gardens, corridors, towers and pavilions that date back 1,000 or more years ago. China will also show you very old structures that Emperors and Empress used to reside in. One of these great places is the Summer Palace. So after you check into your China Hotel make sure you plan on seeing Beijing Summer Palace.

Some of the Summer Palace Attractions include the Court Area, Front-Hill Area, Lake Area and the Rear-Hill area. Did you know that the Summer Palace is the largest and most well-preserved royal park in China. It has the most famous natural views. Chinese horticulture and landscape were greatly influenced by the Summer Palace. Another name of the Summer Palace is the “The Museum of Royal Gardens”.

History Lesson-

In 1750 construction on the Summer Palace started. It was created so that the royal families had a place to rest. Then in the Qing dynasty it became the royal residences.  Later on the Anglo-French allied force destroyed it by fire.  It was reconstructed in 1888. It is said that Empress Dowager Cixi used the Summer Palace to embezzle navy funds to reconstruct it into a resort, so she would be able to spend her life there. Sadly in 1900 the Summer Palace was attacked again, by the Eight-Power Allied Force. It only took China two years to recreate the Summer Palace.

The Summer Palace of today-

The Summer Palace occupies an area of 742.8 acres.  When you travel there you can see over 3,000 man made ancient structures, each one is remarkable. These structures include corridors, pavilions, towers and bridges. Empress Dowager Cixi and Emperor Guangzu used the Court Area to meet with officials and conducted states affairs. The Court Area was broken into two sections one for the court affairs and the other one for living. The Court Area is the first stop for visitors to enjoy the view of Kunming Lake.

The most outstanding area is the Front-Hill Area, since it has delicate buildings and excellent gardens. While you are in this area you can walk up the hilltop and see important building for example Hall of Sea Wisdom, Revolving Archives. The Largest part of the Summer Palace is the Lake Area. Its open ups to Kunming Lake, you can also see Houxi River. When you walk though this area you will walk by pavilions, wharfs and over bridges. There are some famous attractions some include the Seventeen-Arch Bridge and Bronze Ox. The best part of being in the Lake Area is seeing the waves gleam, and the beautiful colors.

The Rear Area is the last area in the Summer Palace. This area is very quiet compared to the other areas. One of the reasons is that some of the constructions were never repaired after the attacks. So when you are walking around you should notice the ruins. So while you are strolling around take your time to feel peaceful and tranquility that the Summer Palace as to offer.

So after you book your Beijing Flight make sure you plan on seeing the Summer Palace. It will cost 60RMBs to get in. The best way to get there is by taking the subway. Make sure you are on line 4 and get off at Beigongmen Station, or you could get off at Xiyuan Station, if you take this way take exit C2 then walk west.

Summer Palace Travel Tips

On July 26, 2011, in Beijing, Summer Palace, Tours, Travel Info, by Jack Li

The best time to visit the Summer Palace is when it is sunny and clear. You can enjoy the view of the Kunming Lake and the general view of the City of Beijing from the Tower of Buddhist Incense. In addition, the coloured paintings on the buildings are exquisite. It is better to wear shoes […]

The best time to visit the Summer Palace is when it is sunny and clear. You can enjoy the view of the Kunming Lake and the general view of the City of Beijing from the Tower of Buddhist Incense. In addition, the coloured paintings on the buildings are exquisite. It is better to wear shoes suitable for a long walk.

Best Time to Visit Summer Palace

You had better come and visit the Summer Palace from April to June and from August to November, when it is neither too hot nor too cold. If you come in springtime, you can enjoy watching the flourishing flowers.

Summer Palace Best Routes

Enter by Donggong Gate (East Palace Gate)

  1. Donggong Gate—Renshou Hall (Hall of Benevolence and Longevity)—Dehe Garden (Hall of Virtue and Harmony)—Wenchang Pavilion—Yulan Hall (Hall of Jade Ripples) and Yiyun House—Leshou Hall (Hall of Joyful Longevity)—Long Gallery—Paiyun Hall—the Tower of Buddhist Incense—stone boat—to South Lake Island by boat—the Seventeen-arch Bridge—Bronze Ox—Xinjian Gong Gate (Newly-built Imperial City Gate) (about 2.5 hours)
  2. Donggong Gate—Renshou Hall (Hall of Benevolence and Longevity)—Dehe Garden (Hall of Virtue and Harmony)—Wenchang Pavilion—Yulan Hall (Hall of Jade Ripples) and Yiyun House—Leshou Hall (Hall of Joyful Longevity)—Long Gallery—Paiyun Hall—the Tower of Buddhist Incense—stone boat—the Ploughing and Weaving Picture Scenic Spot—Ruyi Gate (Gate of Wish Fulfillment) (about 3 hours)
  3. Donggong Gate—Renshou Hall (Hall of Benevolence and Longevity)—Dehe Garden (Hall of Virtue and Harmony)—Wenchang Pavilion—Yulan Hall (Hall of Jade Ripples) and Yiyun House—Leshou Hall (Hall of Joyful Longevity)—Long Gallery—Paiyun Hall—the Tower of Buddhist Incense—Suzhou Street—North Palace Gate (about 2 hours)
  4. Donggong Gate—Renshou Hall (Hall of Benevolence and Longevity)—Dehe Garden (Hall of Virtue and Harmony)—Wenchang Pavilion—Yulan Hall (Hall of Jade Ripples) and Yiyun House—Leshou Hall (Hall of Joyful Longevity)—Long Gallery—Paiyun Hall—the Tower of Buddhist Incense—Suzhou Street—Danning Hall (Hall of Calmness)—Xiequ Garden (the Harmonious Garden)—East Palace Gate (about 2.5 hours)

Summer Palace Tickets

1. Entrance ticket: RMB 30 per person (high season)

RMB 20 per person (low season)

2. Half-price ticket: RMB 15 per person (high season, students only)

RMB 10 per person (high season, students only)

3.Joint ticket: RMB 60 per person (high season)

RMB 40 per person (low season)

4.Single ticket for one attraction within the Summer Palace(year-round price; included in the joint ticket):

The Tower of Buddhist Incense: RMB 10 per person

Suzhou Street: RMB 10 per person

Wenchang Yard: RMB 20 per person

Dehe Garden: RMB 5 per person

How to get to Summer Palace

By Bus

209, 330, 331, 332, 346, 394, 601, 608, 626, 683, 690, 696, 718 (get off at Summer Palace Station)

By Subway

Take Line 4 to Beigongmen Station. You can also get off at Xiyuan, then walk towards the west along Tongqing Street for 500 metres and arrive at East Palace Gate.

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The Cloud Dispelling Hall

On July 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, by Jack Li

The Cloud Dispelling Hall (simplified Chinese:排云殿; traditional Chinese: 排雲殿; pinyin: Pái Yún Diàn; literally “the Hall where the cloud is dispelled”) is at the centre in front of the Longevity Hill. It was built by Qianlong for his mother’s 60th birthday. It was burnt down by the British and French joint troops in 1860. In […]

The Cloud Dispelling Hall (simplified Chinese:排云殿; traditional Chinese: 排雲殿; pinyin: Pái Yún Diàn; literally “the Hall where the cloud is dispelled”) is at the centre in front of the Longevity Hill. It was built by Qianlong for his mother’s 60th birthday. It was burnt down by the British and French joint troops in 1860. In 1886, Empress Ci Xi reconstructed it and changed its name into “Cloud Dispelling Hall” to hold her Grand Birthday Ceremony. It also served as the place where the officials went to worship Ci Xi when she lived in the Summer Palace or on her birthday. Now the hall has on display many birthday presents from the imperial princes and ministers to Ci Xi.

The word “Pai Yun”, meaning “dispel the cloud”, is taken from a poem which describes the imminent appearance of the Gods out of the cloudy and misty hall. Viewed from a distance, the Cloud Dispelling Hall forms an ascending line together with the decorated archway, the Cloud Dispelling Gate, Golden-water Bridge and Ergong Gate, which is the most spectacular building complex in the Summer Palace.

Summer Palace

The Long Gallery

On July 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, by Jack Li

The Long Gallery(simplified Chinese: 长廊; traditional Chinese: 長廊; pinyin: Cháng Láng; literally “the Long Gallery”) is located between the Longevity Hill and the Kunming Lake. The total length of the gallery is 728 meters, making it the longest gallery in the world. It is most famous for the colorful paintings on the roof of the […]

The Long Gallery(simplified Chinese: 长廊; traditional Chinese: 長廊; pinyin: Cháng Láng; literally “the Long Gallery”) is located between the Longevity Hill and the Kunming Lake. The total length of the gallery is 728 meters, making it the longest gallery in the world. It is most famous for the colorful paintings on the roof of the gallery. Some of them present sceneries of mountains and lakes, some depict beautiful flowers and birds, others even tell stories in classical Chinese literature such as A Dream of Red Mansion and The Romance of the Three Kingdoms.

There used to be no paintings along the Long Gallery. It is Empress Ci Xi who ordered to paint them. Why would she do so? It is said that although the Summer Palace was filled with beautiful sceneries, Empress Ci Xi felt bored after she had lived in it for a while. She hoped that she could see numerous different views without walking for a long time. Her servants then lighted her to the idea to paint the gallery with all kinds of attractions and stories. Soon after that, the Long Gallery became colorful. Empress Ci Xi was very satisfied with the renovated gallery.

Summer Palace

The Seventeen-arch Bridge

On July 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, Lakes, by Jack Li

The Seventeen-arch Bridge (simplified Chinese: 十七孔桥; traditional Chinese: 十七孔橋; pinyin: Shí Qī Kǒng Qiáo; literally “the Bridge of Seventeen arches”) stretches over the wide Kunming Lake. It is 150 metres in length and 8 metres in width, and is composed of seventeen arches, hence its name. It is the largest stone bridge in the country. […]

The Seventeen-arch Bridge (simplified Chinese: 十七孔桥; traditional Chinese: 十七孔橋; pinyin: Shí Qī Kǒng Qiáo; literally “the Bridge of Seventeen arches”) stretches over the wide Kunming Lake. It is 150 metres in length and 8 metres in width, and is composed of seventeen arches, hence its name. It is the largest stone bridge in the country. The beautiful streamline arch bridge drives away the emptiness of the Kunming Lake. On the railings on each side of the bridge there are all together 544 stone lions of diverse sizes and postures, and it has 59 more lions than famous Marco Polo Bridge. As you talk along the bridge, you can enjoy watching the interesting stone sculptures.

All of the inscribed boards on the Seventeen-arch Bridge are all written by Qianlong Emperor of the Qing Dynasty. One on the southern side of the bridge says “Xiudong Lingbo”, meaning that the bridge is like a rainbow stretching over the lake. Another one on the north side says “Lingtuo Yanyue”, comparing the bridge to a mythical animal lying across the water like a crescent moon. The night view of the bridge is particularly beautiful.

How was the Seventeen-arch Bridge built?

According to folklore, when the bridge was built, many skilled craftsmen were invited to join the project. The Chinese white jade stone was all excavated by hand in the Stone Nest and transferred to the site by man power. One day a man came to the construction site. He was in his seventies and has long hair and a dusty face. He walked around with a box on his back and shouted repeatedly, “Does anyone want to buy Dragon-gate stone?” The workers thought he was mad because he looked dirty, and no one listened to him.

The old man stayed on the site for three days shouting. But still, no one took any notice. So he walked away from the site. He was taking a rest under a tree when suddenly it began to rain. He was shivering all over. Right at the moment, Wang Daye who lived nearby walked past the tree. He saw the poor old man and took him into his own house.

Wang offered him a place to live in and things to eat. The old man stayed there for a whole year, chiselling the stone he had carried. One morning he said to Wang, “I’m leaving. I’ll never forget your kindness. I’ll give you the stone in return.” Wang did not think the stone was anything special and asked the man to take it with him. The old man said, “This stone will be priceless. You’ll see.” Then he left.

The construction of the Seventeen-arch Bridge was almost completed. Qianlong Emperor was also prepared to come and inspect it in a few days. However, the last stone at the centre of the bridge would not fit however hard the craftsmen tried. It was such an emergency because the emperor would be very angry to see the bridge unfinished still. At that moment somebody spoke of the old man with the Dragon-gate stone, and the chief engineer sent people to look for him.

They soon got new of the whereabouts of the stone. The chief engineer went to Wang’s house and found the stone under the window. He measured it and it fit precisely. They bought the stone from Wang and fixed it onto the bridge. The project was complete!

Afterwards, the craftsmen talked about this and decided that the old man was no other than Lu Ban, the most famous carpenter and builder in China who lived in 5 B.C. His spirit had come specially to help them build the bridge!

Summer Palace

The Kunming Lake

On July 26, 2011, in Beijing, Lakes, Nature Scenery, by Jack Li

The Kunming Lake(simplified Chinese: 昆明湖; traditional Chinese: 昆明湖; pinyin: Kūnmíng Hú; literally “The Kunming Lake”) is the largest lake in the Summer Palace, occupying three quarters of the whole palace. The southern part of the lake presents a halcyon and verdant waterscape while the northern part of the lake is a very good viewing-point where […]

The Kunming Lake(simplified Chinese: 昆明湖; traditional Chinese: 昆明湖; pinyin: Kūnmíng Hú; literally “The Kunming Lake”) is the largest lake in the Summer Palace, occupying three quarters of the whole palace. The southern part of the lake presents a halcyon and verdant waterscape while the northern part of the lake is a very good viewing-point where one can get the overview of the graceful towers and halls in the Summer Palace. There is a causeway called the West Causeway which stretches across the lake. There are many peaches and willows planted on the causeway, creating a very poetic environment. Another famous attraction, the Seventeen-arch Bridge stretches over the lake like an elegant rainbow. The West Causeway and the Seventeen-arch Bridge divide the whole lake into three parts, and in each part there is a small artificial island: the Penglai Island, the Fangzhang Island, and the Yingzhou Island. The designer of the Summer Palace got the idea of creating three islands from Chinese Ancient Legends on the lake. The legends said that there are three islands in the East China Sea called “Penglai”, “Fangzhang”, and”Yingzhou”, and they are the residences of the Chinese gods. In the Chinese history, many emperors would send out their emissaries to the East China Sea to look for these Gods, they believe that they could help them be immortal.

The whole formation of the Kunming Lake is an imitation of another famous Chinese attraction, the West Lake in Hangzhou, which is in Southern China. Emperor Qianlong had been to that region six times during his reign, and the West Lake impressed him a lot. Rumor has it that he met a beautiful lady when he was wandering around the lake and fell in love with her. Maybe that is why he asked the designer to build an attraction that looked almost the same as the West Lake in the palace.

Summer Palace

Summer Palace (Yiheyuan)

On July 26, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, Must-sees, Summer Palace, by Jack Li

The Summer Palace (simplified Chinese: 颐和园; traditional Chinese: 頤和園; pinyin: Yíhé Yuán; literally “Gardens of Nurtured Harmony”) is mainly dominated by the Longevity Hill (60 meters high) and the Kunming Lake. Situated on the western outskirts of Haidian District, the Summer Palace is 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) from central Beijing. It used to be one […]

The Summer Palace (simplified Chinese: 颐和园; traditional Chinese: 頤和園; pinyin: Yíhé Yuán; literally “Gardens of Nurtured Harmony”) is mainly dominated by the Longevity Hill (60 meters high) and the Kunming Lake. Situated on the western outskirts of Haidian District, the Summer Palace is 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) from central Beijing. It used to be one of the temporary imperial palaces for the Qing Dynasty Emperors. The Summer Palace today is the largest royal park in China, and is well preserved as a Key Culture Relics Protection Site. It holds a collection of ancient arts and also has breathtaking sceneries and magnificent architecture. The Summer Palace is the archetypal Chinese garden, and is amongst the most noted and classical gardens of the world. In 1998, it was listed as one of the World Heritage Sites by UNESCO.

The Summer Palace is actually a reconstruction based on the Qingyi Palace. In AD 1750, Emperor Qianlong of Qing Dynasty spent 4.48 million silver dollars on establishing the Qingyi Palace, a present to his mother, Xiaosheng. This palace served to connect four other royal palaces, forming a splendid imperial garden. However, in AD 1860, the 10th year of Emperor Xianfeng, Qingyi Palace was burnt down during the war with Britain and France. Later in AD 1888, the last Empress in Chinese history, Ci Xi, wanted to hold a grand ceremony to celebrate her 60th birthday. In the name of raising war funds, she levied a heavy tax on people and gathered more than 5 million silver dollars, which was enough for the reconstruction. Then she asked one of the most outstanding architects in Qing Dynasty, Changyan Lei to take charge of the project. The new palace was named the Summer Palace. It was frequently visited by the royal family in summer because of its cool environment and its beautiful lake scene. Although the Summer Palace experienced a terrible devastation in AD 1900 and was looted of almost all its treasures, it remains stunningly beautiful. A tour around the Summer Palace is undoubtedly a feast for eye. If you are planning to travel to Beijing, remember to put it in your schedule, because if you do not visit the Summer Palace your trip in Beijing.

Summer Palace Attractions

The Kunming Lake

The Seventeen-arch Bridge

The Long Gallery

The Cloud Dispelling Hall

Summer Palace Story

1. The Cold Palace

To understand where the Cold Palace is, we have to talk about the concubines of the emperor. The feudal emperor had supreme power and he could pick whoever he wanted to be his concubine. Therefore, the emperor had a great number of concubines living in the royal palace. However, if a concubine became out of favour with the emperor, she was left to rot in the palace because she could not leave the palace at will. This was the most tragic end. The Cold Palace of the Summer Palace does not refer to a particular palace; anyplace where those concubines or sons of the emperor were imprisoned is commonly called “the Cold Palace”. And there were several such places in the Summer Palace. Cheng Fei, one of the imperial concubines at the end of the Ming Dynasty, offended the powerful eunuch Wei Zhong xian, and was taken from Changchun Palace(where the concubines lived in the Imperial Palace) to Qianxi in the western part of the Summer Palace, and lived there for four years. Many other concubines had also been driven there. It is said that the most favoured concubine of Guangxu Emperor, Zhen Fei, was shut inside the Beisan Tower to the north of Jingqi Tower, before she was drowned in the well by the order of Empress Ci Xi. The place was destroyed but it still can be traced on the west of Zhen Fei Well.

2. Empress Ci Xi’s meals in the Summer Palace

Being the last empress of China, Empress Ci Xi was famous for her luxurious lifestyle. When she stayed in the Summer Palace, the servants had to prepare hundreds of delicious dishes for her. All the dishes she took could be divided into meat dishes, vegetable dishes, pastry, and fried snacks. The chefs used all kinds of precious ingredients such as pearl powder, bear’s paw, edible bird’s nest, etc.

Empress Ci Xi greatly enjoyed the dishes cooked with flowers. She loved chicken soup with chrysanthemum petals. Sometimes when she was wandering inside the palace, she would even pick a chrysanthemum and eat it. Apart from this, she also liked to take them with tea, which became quite popular among the common Chinese people. Rose, lotus, and lily teas were her favorites.

Every meal of Empress Ci Xi’s was like a grand ceremony. For breakfast, lunch, and dinner there would be more than a hundred different dishes, and for high tea, about fifty dishes. All the dishes were very elaborately prepared. Take the rice as an example, every grain in the rice were carefully selected by the maids. It was quite a tedious job. The cost of one single meal of Ci Xi equals the annual living expenses of an ordinary family.

To sustain her extravagance, she levied heavy taxes on the people. Many people started to resist her rule. She was very afraid that somebody might poison her dishes, so she asked a servant to put a silver needle in every dish before she ate them. If the dish was poisoned, the needle would lose brightness and turn dark.

3. The Tower of Buddhist Incense

It’s said that the Tower of the Buddhist Incense (simplified Chinese: 佛香阁; traditional Chinese: 佛香阁; pinyin:Fóxiāng Gé; literally “the Tower of Buddhist Incense”) was built to drive away the ghosts.

When Emperor Qianlong of Qing Dynasty decided to build a royal palace there, he wanted to remove the Longevity Hill so that the Kunming Lake would be larger. However, when the builders dug half-way down the hill, they were surprised to see that they had reached a grave. The tombstone was inscribed “Queen Wen”. The builders didn’t know what to do with the grave, so they past the news onto the Emperor. Queen Wen was a real character in Chinese history. She was the wife of Kublai Khan of the Yuan Dynasty (AD 1206-1368). Since she possessed extraordinary political wisdom, Kublai Khan loved her very much and held an elaborate funeral for her after she had died. No wonder Emperor Qianlong was curious about those exquisite antiques buried with her. So he went to the construction site and asked the builders to open the tomb. When they got into the tomb, they found a curse inscribed by the entrance, saying ”Whoever disturbs the tomb would be severely punished.”. Emperor Qianlong got really scared, so he told the builders to close the grave and then he ran away. Later, he went to a great Buddhist master and asked him how to avoid Queen Wen’s revenge. The master said that if he built a Buddhist tower on top of the Longevity Hill, the ghost of Queen Wen would be locked up and she would not bring any harm. Qianlong followed his advice, and that is how the Tower of Buddhist Incense came into being.

Summer Palace

On November 8, 2010, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Summer Palace, by Jack Li

Summer Palace is known as ‘The Gardens of Nurtured Harmony’. It contains a huge lake and surrounding hills that attracts thousands of tourists every day. Its beautiful scenery and elegant architectural structures show a lot of history and will give you a great day of sight seeing and cultural knowledge. You should book through China Flights to […]

Summer Palace is known as ‘The Gardens of Nurtured Harmony’. It contains a huge lake and surrounding hills that attracts thousands of tourists every day. Its beautiful scenery and elegant architectural structures show a lot of history and will give you a great day of sight seeing and cultural knowledge. You should book through China Flights to get over to Beijing and then let your trip be organised by China Tours to save yourself organising it yourself, they can do everything for you!

The Summer Palace, Beijing

After arriving to Summer Palace after a long and confusing walk from the train station, we finally found where the entrance was. For some reason, you will find yourself outside a train station a lot without much information of directions to the main attractions there. Sometimes you will need to be prepared enough to find your way to an exact location so take this in mind when using the train. The sun was shining, the sky was blue, it was almost good as a summers day. Once inside, you can’t help but notice the statues and cultural sculptures which will keep you dazed and intrigued about the reasoning behind it all, so getting a guided tour is very useful. You’ll soon find yourself down a path that leads to the great Kunming Lake. Wow! What a sight for sore eyes, you can see the imperial gardens and pavilions in the far distance, a bridge that leads to a smaller island on the other side, and kites in the sky.

Bridge at Summer Palace

Walking around we made our way up to the ‘Temple of Buddhist Incense’ and ‘Sea of Wisdom Temple’, these were both great to look at. It doesn’t seem as high as it looks from the ground but when you climb the tall steps up to the top of the temple, you realise that it was a lot further up than you first thought. We then walked over the bridge on the other side of the lake to the small island where some people were flying kites in the air, this was pretty kool as it was hardly windy at all so I was impressed by there ability to control such a thing so high up.

Summer Palace is a sight seeing must and you won’t be disappointed by the volume of calmness and peace in this place. A brilliant day out indeed. I would recommend you choose China Travel to get there!

Visit to the Summer Palace..

On October 21, 2010, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Cultural Experience, Summer Palace, by Jack Li

When checking out china travel, don”t forget that a trip to Beijing is not complete without visiting the Summer Palace, one of the city”s most impressive and beautiful sights. You can spend a whole day wandering around as there are many different halls, palaces, temples, pavilions and bridges to visit as well as boat trips on offer – just […]

When checking out china travel, don”t forget that a trip to Beijing is not complete without visiting the Summer Palace, one of the city”s most impressive and beautiful sights. You can spend a whole day wandering around as there are many different halls, palaces, temples, pavilions and bridges to visit as well as boat trips on offer – just make sure you are prepared for a lot of walking!

A Pavilion at the Summer Palace

In Chinese, the Summer Palace literally means “Gardens of Nurtured Harmony” and this is a very accurate description. The area covers an expanse of 2.9 square kilometres, three quarters of which is water – and so you can begin to imagine the scenic landscape of hills and open water waiting for you here. As well as the central Kunming Lake, which covers 2.2 square kilometres, you will find Longevity Hill at 60 metres high and a variety of palaces Despite the variety of toxins that are claimed to be causing your illness, marketing claims for dgfev online casino Hair drug test treatments will uniformly fail to link specific toxins to specific symptoms or illnesses. and gardens. I recommend buying the entry ticket which allows you access to online casino all areas so that you can take full advantage of everything it has to offer.

The view over Kunming Lake

If you are pushed for time, my list of must-see things to do are:

1. Take a peddle boat across the lake to enjoy amazing views of the Summer Palace and Longevity Hill

Take a boat ride on the lake for great views of the Summer Palace

2. Visit the Seventeen-Arch Bridge

The Seventeen Arch Bridge

3. Check out the Marble Boat in the grounds of the Summer Palace

4. Go to the Hall of casino Benevolence and Longevity

5. And above all, you MUST climb up Longevity Hill to the Summer Palace, which is of course the main attraction! Here you will also find the Tower of Buddhist Incense, the highest building in the Summer Palace, and the Decorated Paifang.

The Tower of Buddhist Incense

And if you still dont believe me, UNESCO calls the Summer Palace “a masterpiece of Chinese landscape garden design” and included it on its World Heritage List in 1998 and so it really is worth a visit! Finally my two top tips when visiting the Summer Palace are to avoid going during National Holidays as the crowds can become unbearable and will make it almost impossible to get round all the sights.Secondly, pick a clear, sunny day to go so that you can fully enjoy the scenery and take advantage of the boat trips on offer on the lake.

If you are looking for more ideas of what to do in Beijing, check out Beijing Tours for more information.

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