Crouching Tiger Hidden Panda

On June 20, 2012, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Entertainment, by Jack Li

As part of my China travel I ventured into the depths of Houhai to catch a Kung Fu show.  A friend of mine who speaks better Chinese than I bought the tickets from an all Chinese website, and we only had a vague idea what was in store for us.  We got a little turned […]

As part of my China travel I ventured into the depths of Houhai to catch a Kung Fu show.  A friend of mine who speaks better Chinese than I bought the tickets from an all Chinese website, and we only had a vague idea what was in store for us.  We got a little turned around getting there and as a result arrived right before the show began.  When we sat down we were trapped in a sea of Panda costumes, and were worried our poor Chinese has accidentally led us to a kids show.  Once they show started, however, we realized it was anything but, and that the show was a great addition to our China tours.

Kung Fu Bandana

Kung Fu Bandanna

The show was based around two pandas traveling around China to learn about all of the different Kung Fu styles.  Each act took place in a different part of China and focused on a different style.  The acts began with the panda’s wandering through the sets acting as the comic relief clowns.  Then a large group scene would begin with many different martial artists practicing the style and the pandas getting caught in the middle of it.  Finally, a master of the style would come out and perform a much more impressive feat.  These ranged from fighting off an entire group, to breaking a stack of bricks, to fighting upside down.  Everyone in the show was in peak physical condition, and the fighting scenes were spectacular.

I came into the whole show with high expectations after having it built up to me over Skype for hours before I went, and I was not disappointed.  I’ve always had a soft spot for Kung Fu movies, but there is nothing like seeing the real thing.  When you’re on stage there’s [almost] no special effects and no safety net.  The performance was raw, entertaining, and extremely impressive.

The entire show was full of laughs, thrills, and excitement.  It was relatively inexpensive, and was a great way to spend a night.  If you’re interested the website is http://kungfushichahai.com/, it’s in Chinese though so have a friend or Google translator ready if like me your Chinese is not always up to par.  See this show or any Kung Fu show as part of your China travels.  It’s a great way to experience the people and culture of China, and see an amazing show to boot.  Ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages, this is not a show you want to miss.

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Now That’s What I Call a Zoo

On June 19, 2012, in Accomodation, Beijing, China Attractions, Nature Scenery, by Jack Li

Living in America the thought never occurred to me that some of the animals I consider pest and insignificant people in China might considers foreign and exotic. So you can imagine how surprised I was when on my recent tour of the Beijing zoo I went to the American section expecting to see bears a […]

Living in America the thought never occurred to me that some of the animals I consider pest and insignificant people in China might considers foreign and exotic. So you can imagine how surprised I was when on my recent tour of the Beijing zoo I went to the American section expecting to see bears a deer or a cougar and before me lay a cage with raccoons in it. Next to this cage was one with skunks and there were also a few bird cages one of which had blue jays of all things. Needless to say this part of my Beijing tours was both hysterically funny as well as disappointing that they didn’t have any large American animals. But then again seeing a raccoon all plumped up and lazy was pretty fun. I also enjoyed the Australian section which had emus, koalas, Kangaroos and a few other animals I had never seen before. The biggest must see attractions are the Giant pandas, golden monkeys, milu deers and northeast tigers. Just these animals are well worth the travel to Beijing Zoo. And if you want a special treat there are a few elephants to see who have stray cats running around in there cage. Also there are about 15 elephant statues you can climb up onto for an excellent photo opportunity.
However, if you are more into aquarium the Beijing also hosts a gigantic aquarium. It is the largest aquarium in China. In addition it has shows with sea lions and dolphins that are a must see. And if you are looking to get certified for scuba diving you can do it with a dive instructor in their 300 meter tank. However, if you have a fear of sharks, like me, don’t do this or you will have quite a scare. If you are looking for a relaxing day you can also take a boat around the zoo or have an exotic dinner at one of the zoos restaurants which serve exotic dishes. And if you just want to stroll around the park it is filled with beautiful architecture and luxurious gardens. While I was there I watched a girl run out of the bushes with a baby duck she had caught. Don’t ask me how she did it because I remember trying as a child to do the same thing and failing miserably.  Later I saw her again walking around with it by an enormous ornate statue of a tiger and I couldn’t help but think, I still have so much to see and do, but I’m adding catching a duck with my bare hands to the list.   The zoo is just as big as all the other attractions at the zoo so make sure to bring your walking shoes. And if you want to make a two day trip out of it you can stay at one of the close by China hotels. If you do this you can see both the zoo and the 5 story market full anything you could want. It is a great destination for anyone who wants to practice their haggling “I haven’t been everywhere, but it’s on my list.” – Susan Sontag

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How much do you know about Pandas?

On May 11, 2012, in Must-sees, Sichuan, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Many people want to see one of the cute looking white and black panda bears on their China travel experience. But what makes them so special? Sure, with the distinctive color of their fur with the black spots around the eyes, the black ears and nose they are very friendly looking and the way they […]

Many people want to see one of the cute looking white and black panda bears on their China travel experience. But what makes them so special? Sure, with the distinctive color of their fur with the black spots around the eyes, the black ears and nose they are very friendly looking and the way they hold their bamboo in their front paws in adorable. But apart from what they look like some people might not know many other facts about them. In southern China there is the well-known Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in Sichuan province where visitors can learn a lot about this interesting mammal. You can check out the Chengdu flights so see how you can include this in your trip to China.

 


Although the giant panda is classified as a carnivore 99 percent of their diet consists of bamboo shoots and leaves, the most nutritious part of bamboo plants; occasionally they eat other vegetation, fish and other small animals. Bamboo is in general not very nutritious and for that reason pandas eat up to 15 percent of their body weight spending about 12 hours a day chewing on bamboo. For a body weight of 160 lb (about 73 kilogramms) that would make over 24 lb (nearly 11 kilogramms) of food!

 


Pandas live in the mountains in high altitudes and they avoid areas where people live. As a result their habitat is shrinking with people using more and more areas in higher altitudes for farming. They sometimes starve to death because they are unable to move through valleys to find new areas in the mountains offering enough food. Pandas are solitary animals and only meet for a short time to mate. Female pandas don’t give birth to cubs until the age of around six. They give birth to one or two babies at a time which stay with their mother for about one and a half years. When the little babies are born they weigh as little as 3 to 5 ounces (85 to 113 grams) which is only 1/900th of their mother’s weight. It is the largest proportion difference between a mother and a child’s weight in all animals.

 


Research and breeding centers as well as programs are making big efforts to protect this rare mammal but reproduction is a long and complicated process. An estimated 1,600 giant pandas remain in the wild in the southwestern areas of China and just over 100 are living in captivity. With a panda in its logo WWF (the World Wide Fund for Nature) is still one of the primary organizations protecting these special animals in the world. WWF even offers the opportunity to symbolically adopt pandas among many other endangered species. Do you really want to see pandas now? Start planning your China Tours, there are enough opportunities to do that.

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Can’t Leave China Without Seeing a Panda

On October 21, 2011, in Cool Places, Must-sees, Shanghai, by Jack Li

When you plan your China tour make sure you plan on seeing a Panda, because it would be a sin to go all the way to China and not see a panda. A fun place to go see Pandas is the ‘Wild Animal Park’, in Shanghai. Here you will also be able to see 200 […]

When you plan your China tour make sure you plan on seeing a Panda, because it would be a sin to go all the way to China and not see a panda. A fun place to go see Pandas is the ‘Wild Animal Park’, in Shanghai. Here you will also be able to see 200 different animals from all over the world.  Seeing the wild animals will make your Shanghai tour.

The ‘Wild Animal Park’ is China national 1st grade zoo. It coves over 300 acres, don’t worry you don’t have to walk all of those acres. Part of the zoo is a bus tour. There are 200 different animals from all over the world including rare animals. There are five main animal sections which include the animal performing Hall, area for wild beasts, herbivores, penned animals and other animals.

If you love to watch performers then you are going to love watching these animal actors. Elephants, dogs, sheep, bears, tigers, lions, monkeys and parrots all have superior acting skills and they all work well with each other. If you get a chance make sure you go see one of their shows they will surprise you on how good they really are. Another part of the performing hall is the dog racing course, not only do dogs use this course but other animals do to. So you better time your time just right so you can see camels, or ostriches, compete on this course.

The best part of the zoo is the tour bus. It will be an unforgettable experience. You will be able to get close to the animals and see how wild animals act when they are in the wild. The zoo feeds the tigers and lions live animals so that they will keep their survival instincts. So keep your eyes open since you might be able to see these animals catch, kill and eat their prey.  One of the benefits on going on the bus tour is that you are able to feed and take pictures of the animals, such as bears who will come up to the bus and beg for food and you will  be able to feed giraffes leaves.

When you go to the Wild Animal Park, make sure you go see the Penned animal’s area, because this area includes the giant panda hall. And you can’t leave China without seeing the Pandas. In this area you will be able to see a white lion, white tiger, kangaroo and crocodiles and much more. This area will teach you about how the animals lives and what they like to eat. So when you leave the zoo you will be educated. Don’t forget to see the bird garden and young animal garden.

While you are at the zoo you can ride the Ferris wheel and be able to see the bird’s eye view. If you are getting tried and don’t want to walk any more then you can ride the electric power cart it will carry you around the zoo. If you bring children and they want to play there is an amazing outdoor playground. Don’t worry about getting hungry since there are restaurants located around the zoo. Also don’t forget to buy a souvenir when you are there. 

Just remember you can’t leave China without seeing a Panda. So when you get off your China flight make note that you want to see a real Panda. If you go visit Shanghai make sure you stop by the Wild Animal Zoo, it will cost 120RMBs for adults and 60RMBs for children who are 4 feet tall, and free for children you are less than 2 feet tall.

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Baby Panda

On July 1, 2010, in Featured China Stories, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Five-month-old giant panda cub, Yun Zi, made his official debut Wednesday at the San Diego Zoo. “The giant panda is one of many animal species around the globe fighting for survival. We expect Yun Zi to become an ambassador for conservation, one of the many animal here at the San Diego Zoo helping to connect people […]

Five-month-old giant panda cub, Yun Zi, made his official debut Wednesday at the San Diego Zoo. “The giant panda is one of many animal species around the globe fighting for survival. We expect Yun Zi to become an ambassador for conservation, one of the many animal here at the San Diego Zoo helping to connect people to wildlife,” said Douglas Myers, San Diego Zoo chief executive officer.

Yun Zi was born Aug. 5, 2009, to mother Bai Yun and father Gao Gao.

The cub, “son of cloud,” is named in recognition of Bai Yun, whose name means “white cloud.”

The cub weighed 19.4 pounds during the last veterinary checkup Dec. 29.

Yun Zi, the five-month-old panda cub, hangs onto a limb while playing in one of

 

the panda exhibit areas at the San Diego Zoo Wednesday Jan. 6. 2010 in San Diego. Yun Zi goes on display to the public tomorrow. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi) San Diego: Yun Zi, the five-month-old panda cub, hangs onto a limb while playing in one of the panda exhibit areas at the San Diego Zoo Wednesday Jan. 6. 2010 in San Diego. Yun Zi goes on display to the public tomorrow.  (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

 

The name Yun Zi was picked through a public vote on the zoo’s Web site held Oct. 31 – Nov. 3, receiving 28 percent of the 17,526 votes.The San Diego Zoo is home to five giant pandas: the cub Yun Zi, mother Bai Yun, father Gao Gao, 4-year-old sister Su Lin and 2 year old sister Zhen Zhen. Yun Zi is the fifth cub born to Bai Yun.

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