Plan a family outing at the China science and technology museum

On July 13, 2012, in Activities, Beijing, More Places of Interest, Museums, by Jack Li

Address : Olympic Village 奥运村地区 朝阳区朝阳区北辰东路5号5 Beichen Donglu, Chaoyang District For my first travel to Beijing, I bought a guide book like all the newcomers to know what to do in this unknown city. Of course I did all the must-sees monuments and places during my tour in Beijing, but I noticed in a little […]

Address :
Olympic Village 奥运村地区
朝阳区朝阳区北辰东路5号5 Beichen Donglu, Chaoyang District

For my first travel to Beijing, I bought a guide book like all the newcomers to know what to do in this unknown city. Of course I did all the must-sees monuments and places during my tour in Beijing, but I noticed in a little section of the book that there is a science and technology museum in the capital, and then it became a must-see place for me to visit too! Actually I live near the science and technology museum in my hometown in France, I do have a lot of fun there when I was younger (I still enjoy going there by the way) and it was one of my favourite place. These two museums are quite similar in the design; I mean they both have a giant dome screen to watch in their theatre, and they are both located in a park. I think this is a very interesting and entertaining place to go for a family outing where both parents and children can have fun and discover new things.

The Chinese science and technology museum is located in the Olympic Village, at ten minutes east of the south gate of the Olympic Forest Park. The gates are open from Tuesday to Sunday 9:30-16:30, and the ticket service closes at 15:30. The ticket is not very expensive; to enter in the main exhibition gallery it is 30RMB per adult, 20RMB for students and 15RMB for young people under 18. On the other hand the access to the Science paradise is cheaper for adults which costs only 10RMB and more expensive for children 20RMB. The ticket for the 3D and 4D theater is the same price than the main exhibition gallery one for the adults, and it’s 20RMB for children. The museum is composed by 2 halls in 2 different buildings, the first one exhibits ancient Chinese technology such as astronomical devices, the compass, gunpowder, bronze smelting and casting, and so forth. The second one displays topics concerning astronautics, energy, communications, material science and mechanics, information technology life science, and environmental science.

This museum is the only one in this category in China. In Beijing when someone is talking about this place, others immediately associate it with kids: it is like a giant interactive playground for them. The main visitors of this museum are mainly Chinese families, you won’t see a lot of western tourists, but believe me it is worth to see! It’s got all the things you’d expect from a science and technology museum. The busiest gallery is on the first floor called “The Glory of China” displaying all the Chinese inventions; the second floor “Exploration and Discovery” focuses on human biology, nature, and the physics of sound, third floor is “The Way to Live” dealing about the human organism, fourth floor calls “Challenges the future” displaying future technologies, on the fifth floor you have the “Science Paradise” a big playground for children, and on the sixth floor some restaurants. Not only that, but all of the exhibits work and are staffed. There is quite a lot of information in English, more than enough to make this a great museum for English only speakers.

I think that there’s no need to say that the best would to visit the museum on workdays (and avoid going there on weekends and holidays), so your children could totally enjoy all the interactive attractions without lining up. Make sure that your China travel will offer them real entertaining time while having fun and learning at the same time.

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Beware of the Wild Insects

On May 22, 2012, in Museums, Places of Interest, Shanghai, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

If you travel to Shanghai with kids you certainly don’t want to miss the most popular places the city has to offer like the Bund or Yu Gardens. But on the other hand kids might get bored of too much sightseeing after a while. For a little break in between the Wild Insect Kingdom is […]

If you travel to Shanghai with kids you certainly don’t want to miss the most popular places the city has to offer like the Bund or Yu Gardens. But on the other hand kids might get bored of too much sightseeing after a while. For a little break in between the Wild Insect Kingdom is a great place for families in particular but in general for everyone interested in nature and animals. And museums are always a great option in case the weather is not so great while you’re on your China Tours.

 

There are not only insects but also a large number of reptiles, amphibians and fish as well as other animals you actually wouldn’t expect in an insect museum. This might come as a surprise to parents but for kids it offers just more exciting things to see. The first animals you see when you walk inside are not insects either. Three ferrets and a seal in a very small tank welcome you at the entrance before you get to the ‘rainforest’. While walking across bridges you’ll pass an alligator and chameleons and you can feed the huge koi fish swimming in the water underneath. The path leads you towards an area with snakes and little monkeys before you get to the actual insects with all kinds of bugs, like walking sticks, beetles, centipedes etc.

 

There is no elevator to the basement floor, so be prepared to carry your stroller down or just leave it there for a while if you don’t really need it. The lower floor is partly decorated like a cave showing more animals in their habitat. The selection of turtles and tortoises is pretty extensive and some are really interesting to look at, not only for kids. There is even a section with goats, bunnies, Guinea pigs and other animals kids love to pet. A great place for younger kids is the little water landscape where they can just play or try to catch some fish. You might consider bringing some clothes to change in case they get themselves all wet. There is a rest area right next to the water place but apart from popcorn you can’t really get anything to eat in the museum, so you should bring enough snacks for while you’re there.

 

The Museum is located in Shanghai’s center close to the Oriental Pearl Tower. You can get there via the Bund Sightseeing Tunnel to cross to the other side of Hunagpu River in case your Shanghai Hotel is located west of it. For young kids this tunnel is already an adventure comparable to an amusement park ride with sound and light effects and meanwhile a convenient way to cross from one side of the river to the other. When you get out of the underground pass you follow along the street on your left hand side and at the next street corner you’ll find a sign towards the museum. The Shanghai Aquarium is also not far, so if you want to see both places you can easily do that on the same day.

The National Art Museum of China

On April 24, 2012, in Beijing, China Attractions, Museums, by Jack Li

All people who travel have different plans, interests and expectations. Still, when you travel to Beijing few people will leave out famous Wangfujing Street on their Beijing tours. So if you’re interested in culture and contemporary art the National Art Museum of China (NAMOC) is a great place to visit on the same day because […]

All people who travel have different plans, interests and expectations. Still, when you travel to Beijing few people will leave out famous Wangfujing Street on their Beijing tours. So if you’re interested in culture and contemporary art the National Art Museum of China (NAMOC) is a great place to visit on the same day because it’s located right at the north end of Wangfujing Street. There is no general entrance fee; you just need to present your passport at the ticket booth. Depending on the temporary exhibitions there might be an extra fee but that’s not generally the case. At the entrance desk you can also leave bags and jackets without paying a fee.

The museum was built in 1959 for the tenth anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. It was finally completed and opened to the public in 1962. Since then the institution has been a center for research and exhibition and is the most important institute for art in China. It displays mainly modern and contemporary art works by national artist, not only paintings but also photographs, calligraphy, printing art, ceramics and sculptures. Occasionally, pieces of art from abroad are displayed and there have also been numerous international exhibitions.

The main body of the gallery is built in the style of a traditional Chinese pavilion with a roof out of yellow tiles and a title board at the entrance gate which was inscribed by Mao Zedong. The inside of the building is very modern and equipped with the newest technologies after undergoing major renovation in 2002/2003. The museum consists of three main exhibition floors, the first, third and fifth floor with high ceilings leaving enough space even for very large paintings. There are 17 exhibition halls covering a total area of 8,300 square meters.

Visitors hoping to learn about the development of Chinese art in the past centuries won’t find a lot of information about it. This might come as a surprise to some so it’s always a good advice to check out the gallery’s homepage to find out about the current exhibitions. Some are only displayed for no longer than a week and others last up to a month but rarely longer than that. But therefore the temporary exhibitions with works of renowned Chinese artists are hard to find in other places, especially in such dimensions. Moreover, the changing themes and pieces of art also keep it interesting for local visitors.

For people interested in art and especially in contemporary art this place is worth a visit although it helps to know in advance what to expect. And to find out more about Chinese culture and history there is more than enough opportunity to learn when going on China tours. In all bigger cities there are definitely numerous museums and exhibitions for all kinds of interests.

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Diversity in History

On April 23, 2012, in Beijing, Historical Relics, Museums, by Jack Li

To escape the springtime heat and falling pollen (for hay fever sufferers) on your travel to Beijing, there is always the National Museum of China to try out. This building is directly opposite The Great Hall of the People on Tiananmen Square and houses some of the best artwork and historical relics the country has […]

To escape the springtime heat and falling pollen (for hay fever sufferers) on your travel to Beijing, there is always the National Museum of China to try out. This building is directly opposite The Great Hall of the People on Tiananmen Square and houses some of the best artwork and historical relics the country has to offer. What’s more, admission is free but due to the significance of the place; ensure that you bring your passport in order to enter. Queues aren’t too much of an issue as there are plenty of security inspectors on hand. Be sure not to take food and drink into the museum (there is a café and food stalls inside) and avoid using flash on your camera in the exhibits where picture-taking is allowed. Tiananmen East on Line 1 is the nearest subway station and there are many Beijing hotels in relatively close proximity.

The museum formed in 2003 and is the product of two predecessor museums (the Museum of the Chinese Revolution and the National Museum of Chinese History). After which the museum closed for four years and reopened in 2011 with twenty-eight new exhibition halls. The scale of the building (191,900 square meters) means that you could spend a whole day there (or in any case, you could just go to the parts you’re interested in). These facts alone should, hopefully, be reason enough to go and experience the grandeur of the building and its vast collections.

The historical content found at the museum encompasses topics ranging from; prehistoric man in China (the ‘Peking Man’), Neolithic China and all the way through to the dynastic periods. Within this historical timeline, various themes are encountered which highlight the amazing diversity in China’s history. In particular, the prevalence of ceramics is a running theme throughout the historical exhibits. The designs and production of the pottery, for one, are a remarkable indication of the society’s progression down the ages. Even the usage of the numerous ceramic containers reflects the sharing culture in which China adopted thousands of years ago and has continued ever since.

Nevertheless, the exhibits convey an important message insofar as China’s history is multi-layered and colourful. Indeed, sections of the museum which can be highly recommended to view include reading about the country’s unification, international trade, ethnic groups and social reforms. These topics are all extremely thought-provoking and complement China’s historical diversity. Notes, maps and general information pertaining to the infamous Chinese explorer, Zheng He, are available to read. Amongst other things, Zheng He, was noted for sailing as far as Africa in the 15th century! Another particularly interesting aspect which one exhibit draws upon is the prominence gender; with both male and female figures represented (such as a display of figures of ancient female polo players).

To truly appreciate China, then reading about its history might be a good place to start, and the descriptions in the museum can provide a basic overview as they  are written in a concise manner in both Chinese and English. If anything, rather than reading, the majority of your time will most likely be spent by staring at some of the incredible artifacts such as depictions of emperors and jade-fashioned items or a couple of superb terracotta warriors (if you are not going to travel to Xi’an but are considering Beijing flights).

 

 

 

A Quiet Spot in Busy Beijing

On April 16, 2012, in Beijing, Temples, Towers, Pagodas & Grottoes, by Jack Li

Everybody who stops by in Beijing on a China tour might only have time to see the main tourist attractions. But if you have enough time for more, you should take a closer look at the less crowded and maybe even hidden places and there are many of those throughout the city. Of course, you […]

Everybody who stops by in Beijing on a China tour might only have time to see the main tourist attractions. But if you have enough time for more, you should take a closer look at the less crowded and maybe even hidden places and there are many of those throughout the city. Of course, you can’t travel to Beijing without visiting at least one or two of the numerous temples. The Five Pagoda Temple (Wutasi) is a very good recommendation because it’s not too popular with tourists and a comparably quiet place in this busy city with a great atmosphere. When it’s a little windy you can hear the jingling sound of the bells from the five pagodas.

The temple is not far from the north gate of Beijing Zoo in Haidian district. The closest subway station is in front of the National Library, a good opportunity to take a look at it on the way to the temple. The entrance fee is 20 RMB and there is the possibility to rent an audio guide in five different languages at the entrance gate for more profound information. The original name of the temple is Zhenjue Temple, meaning ‘True Awakening Temple’, and has a long and eventful past. First built during the Ming dynasty and completed in 1473 it was since then burned down to the ground twice and had to be rebuilt.

The main element of this temple is a little hidden behind two huge Gingko trees growing on either side. It consists of a square five-storey foundation, known as the throne, which is 55 ft (17 m) high. The outside is decorated with carvings of Buddhas, Buddhist shrines and Sanskrit letters on all four sides. Five small stone pagodas rise from the base like diamonds. There is a larger pagoda in the middle of the throne surrounded by four smaller ones on each corner. Just like the foundation they are engraved with images of Buddha, animal figures and Buddhist symbols. It is an Indian-style construction with some influence of Chinese architecture and has therefore a unique character.

The temple grounds around the five pagoda construction are used as the Art Museum of Stone Carvings and display numerous exhibits from different dynasties. There is a large display of tombstones in different sizes from the Tang to Qing dynasty, stone inscriptions in several languages, sculptures, calligraphy tablets as well as stone altars and other stone objects.

The building at the north end of the main construction is used as an exhibition hall separated into three sections. Many objects, mainly from the Beijing area, are displayed. Nearly all explanations on the inside are in Chinese and English and it gives lots of interesting information about stone carving, the history of the temple and preserving historical sites and objects. Inside the building there is also a small souvenir shop and the tables and chairs outside invite to sit down for a rest or to enjoy a little snack. So don’t miss your chance to see this peaceful place when you go on your personal Beijing tours.

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The Family Museum Experience

On April 5, 2012, in Beijing, Museums, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

You are going to travel to Beijing and are interested in nature and the environment? If you are travelling with kids the Natural History Museum of Beijing might be the right place for you to go. It is one of the biggest museums of its kind in China and offers lots of interesting things to see for […]

You are going to travel to Beijing and are interested in nature and the environment? If you are travelling with kids the Natural History Museum of Beijing might be the right place for you to go. It is one of the biggest museums of its kind in China and offers lots of interesting things to see for all ages. It’s easy to find right next to the Park in which The Temple of Heaven is situated. There you can also relax and walk around and, of course, visit the famous temple before or after your visit to the museum. Or you can book one of the numerous Beijing tours instead if you want to see more historical sights.

Especially on a holiday this place is packed with kids, parents and grandparents enjoying family time together. There are different areas, for example The Gallery of Ancient Reptiles, the Dinosaur Park or the Discovery Park where visitors can see, touch and learn. With many hands-on experiences it is very child friendly and interestingly presented. Some appliances don’t work anymore but especially the kids don’t seem to care too much about it.

Like most other museums it is closed on Mondays, just keep that in mind when you plan your trip. Although there is no general entrance fee you have to pay for the special exhibition. But I’d say it’s worth the money.
If you don’t have good knowledge of the Chinese language it is advisable to rent an English translator because some parts of the museum are only in Chinese and in other parts some titles and explanations are in English but all further information is not. For some further details, the translator is very helpful and informative and easy to use.

Although it is popular with families and it attracts lots of visitors there is still room for improvements, concerning for example modern technologies and interactive appliances. Nevertheless, the 3D and 4D Theater is a real highlight with several different films which are shown at different times during the day. Unfortunately, there so far no films in English and also no translation service for the theater. So it is not made for foreigners.

The last floor is currently partly under construction and hard to find since the stairs of the main hall just lead to the upper floors. So you either have to walk up and then find stairs to walk two floors down or you have to cross the first floor to find stairs leading downwards. There are several stores to buy games, books and other souvenirs as well as cafeterias for a little break in between. All in all it’s a very recommendable location for a family trip.

You’ve already seen everythingthat’s important to you in Beijing? Go on travelling, there are so many other intersting places to see. Why don’t you travel to Shanghai?

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National Museum of China

On September 23, 2011, in Activities, Beijing, Cultural Experience, Museums, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Located on the east side of Tian’anmen Square in downtown Beijing, the National Museum of China was founded in February 2003 after merging with the former National Museum of Chinese History and the National Museum of Chinese Revolution. History and art are two factors emphasized in the collections and is also a terrific place for […]

Located on the east side of Tian’anmen Square in downtown Beijing, the National Museum of China was founded in February 2003 after merging with the former National Museum of Chinese History and the National Museum of Chinese Revolution. History and art are two factors emphasized in the collections and is also a terrific place for school trips and as a tourist attraction.

The predecessor of the National Museum of Chinese History is the Preparatory Office of the National Museum of History which was founded on July 9th, 1912. It was renamed the Beijing Museum of History after October 1st, 1949 when People’s Republic of China was founded. After a decade, it was renamed the National Museum of Chinese History. The predecessor of the National Museum of Chinese Revolution was the Preparatory Office of the National Museum of Revolution founded in March, 1950 and renamed ten years later.

In August, 1959, the new buildings on the east side of the Tian’anmen Square were constructed. The museum was regarded one of the “Top Ten Great Constructions” for celebrating the 10th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. The two museums opened to the public on that October 1st .The aims of the National Museum of China are to protect Chinese cultural heritage, display a long-standing history, provide education on history and culture to the public, especially for the younger generation and promote cultural exchange and communication with other countries and regions. It is not also a museum and a perfect place for further study of culture, history and art.

After the expansion of 2010, the National Museum of China became the largest museum in the world with an area of 191,900 square meters. There are over 1 million collections in 49 galleries. Ancient China and The Road of Rejuvenation are two permanent exhibitions with over a dozen showrooms each. The Museum of Chinese History covers the collections from 1.7 million years ago to the end of the Qing Dynasty. The National Museum of China contains over 620,385 cultural items in its permanent art collection, and the museum displays many precious and rare Chinese historical artifacts that are not found in other museums.

The Most Important Collections

1. Houmuwu square cauldron (ding)

Houmuwu square cauldron (ding) was cast over 3,000 years ago and weighing 832.84 kilograms. It the largest Shang ritual bronze vessel found to date and the heaviest ancient bronze item in the world.

2. Square vessel (fang zun) with four rams

Being the biggest existing square zun, square vessel with four rams was made in Late Shang (1300–1046 BC) with a height of 58.3cm. It is a perfect fusion of moulding and artistic design representing the best bronze-making traditional technique.

How to get tickets

The museum is at No. 16, Chang’an Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing. Its opening times are 9:00 to 17:00 Tuesday to Sunday. Tickets are issued until 15:30 and last admission is at 16:00. You can get a free ticket from the Ticket Office at the West Gate by showing your valid ID (passport). Group visitors (more than 20 people) have to book the free tickets seven days before by calling 010-65116400 and get them at the North Gate Ticket Office with a certificate letter of the unit.

Museum of China Wang

On August 26, 2011, in Ancient Houses & Courtyards, Chinese Towns & Villages, Museums, Shanxi, by Jack Li

China Wang’s Museum is located in the Hongmen Bao architecture complex of Wang’s Grand Courtyard, which is in Lingshi County of Shanxi Province. Wang’s Grand Courtyard now covers an area of 3500 square meters and it’s the only museum of Wang’s family culture at home and broad. There are 261 kinds of Wang’s family trees […]

China Wang’s Museum is located in the Hongmen Bao architecture complex of Wang’s Grand Courtyard, which is in Lingshi County of Shanxi Province. Wang’s Grand Courtyard now covers an area of 3500 square meters and it’s the only museum of Wang’s family culture at home and broad. There are 261 kinds of Wang’s family trees storing up in the exhibition hall.

The content of exhibition starts from the origin of surname and Wang, showing the first ancestor, lineage, migration, distribution, figures, achievements, records of family pedigree of Wang’s family. In addition, there are numerous extant words, objects, pictures, phonotapes and cideotapes. Meanwhile, Wang’s descendant– Lingshi Jingsheng Wang’s family history is listed as a necessary part. All of these exhibitions reflect Wang’ contributions to the civilizing process in five thousand years history of China.

Wang’s Grand Courtyard is Jerusalem in Wang’s family members’ heart all over china. China Wang’s Museum, which takes Wang’s Grand Courtyard as the carrier, is the centralized exhibit of the overall features of Wang’s family members; it’s also the final end-result of Wang’s spirits in various sections of society. With the constant improvement of the exhibition hall, China Wang’s Museum will finally become a Wang’s family culture center, which has complete functions and gathers research, collection and exhibition.

Chinese Folk Forbidden City- Grand Courtyard of Wang

National Museum of China

On August 17, 2011, in Beijing, Museums, Must-sees, by Jack Li

China is full of culture and history, almost everything that you can see, smell, hear and taste in China has a story behind it. A great place to go to get background knowledge about it all is from museums and one of the most infamous ones in China is the National Museum of China. When […]

China is full of culture and history, almost everything that you can see, smell, hear and taste in China has a story behind it. A great place to go to get background knowledge about it all is from museums and one of the most infamous ones in China is the National Museum of China. When you Travel to Beijing and have your Beijing Tours don’t forget to visit this monument which is located in Tiananmen Square in Beijing. The mission of the museum is to educate people about the arts and history of China.

The National Museum of China (NMC) was founded in February 2003 after a merger between the former National Museum of Chinese History and the National Museum of Chinese Revolution. NMC is an integrated national museum under the Ministry of Culture of the People’s Republic of China it focuses on both history and art. Not only this but the museum puts a great emphasise and dedication to its collection, exhibitions, research, archaeology, public education, and cultural communication.

The National Museum holds the country’s most important historical objects. Through China’s History Exhibition, these are shown to visitors from both inside and outside China, to display the long history and continuous civilization of the Chinese people. At the same time, the museum undertakes education projects, archaeological excavations and scientific research, which it puts a great value on. The earliest item on display is the teeth of Yuanmou Man from Yunnan Province, dating back to about 1,700,000 years. The most recent are historical artefacts from Xinhai Revolution of 1911.

The National Museum of China contains over 620,385 cultural items in its permanent art collection and the museum displays many precious and rare Chinese historical artefacts which are not found in many other museums in China or the world.

Some of the most important collections at the National Museum of China are; the “Simuwu Ding” (a form of vessel) from the Shang Dynasty, which was cast over 3,000 years ago and weighing 832.84 kg. This is the heaviest ancient bronze ware in the world. The Shang Dynasty square bronze “Zun” (wine vessel) is decorated with four sheep heads, a large rare inscribed Western Zhou Dynasty (11th century BC – 771 BC) bronze Pan, gold-inlaid bronze tally in the shape of a tiger from the Qin Dynasty, a Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD) jade burial suit sewn with gold thread,and a comprehensive collection of tri-coloured glazed sancai of the Tang Dynasty and ceramics from the Song Dynasty.

In addition to seeing these ancient artefacts, spectators also come to partake in exhibitions. In the past the museum has had a lot of exhibitions on artists such as; Art of Pan Tianshou, Art of Li Keran and Art of Huang Zhou. But the exhibitions aren’t limited to just being about art, they range of many different talks, there is an exhibition coming up on ancient Chinese money. It demonstrates the historical development of ancient Chinese money, the connections between economic development and the issuance and circulation of currency within each period.

To embrace the history of China get Beijing Flights and experience how China got to where it is today.

The Palace Museum Travel Tips

On August 12, 2011, in Beijing, Forbidden City, Museums, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Initially named Forbidden City, the Palace Museum was the imperial palace of Ming and Qing dynasty.  Located in the center of Beijing, it is a prominent work of ancient constructions.  At present, it is the largest and best preserved wooden building in the world. Best Time to the Palace Museum As Beijing lies in temperate […]

Initially named Forbidden City, the Palace Museum was the imperial palace of Ming and Qing dynasty.  Located in the center of Beijing, it is a prominent work of ancient constructions.  At present, it is the largest and best preserved wooden building in the world.

Best Time to the Palace Museum

As Beijing lies in temperate continental monsoon climate zone, temperate continental monsoon climate, each season has its own characteristic.  Winters are dry, cold, windy and dusty; general temperature in January is minus 4 degree.  On the contrary, summer is hot, wet and rainy with a general temperature of 26℃.  So the best time to Palace Museum is from late April and early June; from late August to the end of November.  During the first period, Beijing is just in spring, when the Palace Museum full of vibrant trees and bright—colored flowers.

The Palace Museum Best Routes

The recommended route is as follows.  Come in from the Meridian Gate, then walk along the axle wire and visit the Golden Devine Might Hall, the Hall of Supreme Harmony, the Hall of Central Harmony, Hall of Preserving Harmony, Palace of Heavenly Purity, the Hall of Union, Palace of Earthly Tranquility and the Imperial Garden one by one.

As you going through the Gate of Heavenly, there are three different tour routes available.  If you are on a half—day trip, the mid route is recommended.  Going along the mid route, you can look around the Palace of Heavenly Purity, the Hall of Union, the Palace of Earthly Tranquility and residences of imperial Concubines.  Generally speaking, visiting the whole museum in half day is impossible; one day is better.  If you want to have an in-depth tour, two days are needed.

The Palace Museum Tickets

In boom season (from April to October): 60RMB/person (Treasure Hall and Watch Museum are not included).

In slack season (from November to March): 40RMB/person (Treasure Hall and Watch Museum are not included).

Treasure Hall (located in Palace of Tranquil Longevity, including Chinese Opera Hall and Stone Drums Museum): 10RMB/person.

Watch Museum (located in the Hall of Ancestral Worship):10RMB/person.  (Ticket is free for child whose height is less than 1.2m with the company of guardian)

Preferential policy (Treasure Hall and Watch Museum are not included): ticket is 20RMB/student for students (including students from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan; except for students of adult education and graduate students) with student cards or a letter of introduction from school.

How to Get to the Palace Museum

By bus: line1, 4, 5, 10, 20, 52,101,103 and more arrive at Tiananmen station.

By subway: take line1 and get off Tiananmen east or west station, then walk to the Tiananmen Square.

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