Money is Just Money..Right?

On July 13, 2011, in Beijing, Tibet, by Jack Li

Wrong! Chinese RMB like most currencies in the world, holds strong historical meaning, as demonstrated in the following image. So while spending your money on tours such as China Tours and China Travel why not let money be your inspiration and motivation for your sightseeing plans? Let this be your guide to the true meaning and value […]

Wrong! Chinese RMB like most currencies in the world, holds strong historical meaning, as demonstrated in the following image. So while spending your money on tours such as China Tours and China Travel why not let money be your inspiration and motivation for your sightseeing plans? Let this be your guide to the true meaning and value of money!

The old 10 RMB note depicts ‘Mount Qomolangma’. Mount Qomolangma is better known as Mount Everest and is the worlds largest mountain located in Nepal-Tibet on the Sagamartha Zone.

The old 5 RMB note depicts The Three Gorges, also known as the Wuxia Gorge of the Three Gorges.  The three Gorges occupies around 120km of thr Yangtze River. It is located between Fengjie and Yichang city in Chongqing. The popularity of the Three Gorges came fter the construction of the Three Gorges Dam, which ahs fundamentally changed the scenary of the region.

The new 10RMB note also depicts the Three Gorges

The Old 50 note depicts Hugou Waterfall

The new 5RMB note depicts ‘Mount Tai’. Mount Tai is one of the ‘5 Sacred Mountains’  holding great significance both historically and socially for China. . The mountain is associated with sunrise, birth and renewal and is often regarded as the most important of the 5. It is for this reason it has been a place of worship for as many as 3000 years.  It is located in the north of the city of Tai’an in Shandong province China.

The new 20RMB note depicts ‘Li River’. The image on the reverse side of the new 20 Yuan note is a view of a fisherman on his bamboo raft floating down the Li River through the remarkable Karst mountains of Guilin.

The Old 100RMB note depicts Jing ging Mountain, a renowned revolutionary base for the Chinese Red Army following the turning of the KMT on the CPC during the shanghai Massacre of 1927. Following the attack many fled to the country side, those that did not Mao Zedong Led to Jiang gangshan where he set up his first peasant soviet.

The new 50RMB note depicts the Potala palace in Tibet. Honoured as a UNESCO world heritage site famous for being the Chief residence of Dalai Lama until the 14th Dalai Lama fled to Dharamsala, India as a result of  unsuccessful uprisings and invasions in 1959. The building is today a museum.

The old 1RMB note depicts the Great Wall. The great wall was originally built as a defence mechanism for the Chinese Empire to protect against intrusions. Since this time (5th Century) multiple walls have been built that are collectively referred to as The Great Wall. The wall stretches from Shanaiguan in the east to Lop Lake in the west. The entire Great Wall with all its branches stretches for 8,851.8km (5,500.3miles)

The new 1 RMB note depicts West Lake.  The lake is a fresh water lake located in Hangzhou, a historic centre, which is also the cpaital of the Thejjiang province. The lake has been influenctial throughout the years, inpriring many works of art by from paintings to poetry. The lake was crowned aUNESCO World Hertiage Site in 2011.

The new 100RMb note depicts The Great Hall of the People, Beijing. The hall opening in September 1959, having been completed within the space of 10months by volunteers. It was one of the ‘Ten Great Constructions’ completed to commemorate the 10th Anniversary of the Peoples Republic.

Why not cease the opportunity to visit these places and take you own pictures of the sites and compare them to the currency! check out China Flights

Bamboozled!

On July 13, 2011, in Featured China Stories, by Jack Li

What grows up to 100 cm (39 inches) per day and thrives in any climate? What can be used in every aspect of Chinese culture ranging from musical instruments to weaponry to textiles?  You guessed it: bamboo! Bamboo, the largest member of the grass family, is of great economic and cultural importance all across Asia, […]

What grows up to 100 cm (39 inches) per day and thrives in any climate? What can be used in every aspect of Chinese culture ranging from musical instruments to weaponry to textiles?  You guessed it: bamboo! Bamboo, the largest member of the grass family, is of great economic and cultural importance all across Asia, serving both as a food source and a versatile raw product. See this amazing plant in abundance! Book a China Flight today and sign up to join a Guilin Tour to see a province in Southern China with a fantastic natural landscape. Below is just a sampling of the ways in which bamboo is used in China:

Cuisine

It’s not only pandas that eat bamboo – the Giant Panda of China (among many other animals) voraciously consumes soft bamboo shoots, stems, and leaves – humans can, too! All parts of the bamboo plant are edible in some form to some creature. In China, bamboo can be found sliced and either fresh or canned at local supermarkets. Bamboo leaves are used as wrappers for steamed dumplings. A sweet wine called ulanzi can be fermented from the sap of young stalks. The empty hollow of large bamboo stalks can be used to compress tea leaves and produce Pu’er tea.

Some species of bamboo contain cyanide, a toxin that when ingested in large quantities will kill a human.

Construction

The earliest mention of bamboo being used in Chinese construction can be found in writings dating back to 960 CE which speak of a simple bamboo suspension bridge in Qian-Xian. Bamboo has long been used as scaffolding, a practice which persists in Hong Kong but has been banned in China for buildings over six stories tall. Today, a number of institutions view bamboo as an eco-friendly construction material for its sustainability advantages. Mainstream construction depots stock bamboo as an option for flooring, furniture, and entire house building.

Ornamentation

If you’re looking to decorate your home with bamboo, think again before buying that ornamental plant marked “lucky bamboo”! It is actually Dracaena sanderiana, an entirely unrelated member of the lily family often associated with Feng Shui.

Perhaps “lucky bamboo” is commonly sold in place of real bamboo because a contained bamboo plant is difficult to maintain. Even concrete and special HDPE plastic barriers are sometimes not able to contain its aggressive roots! Furthermore, within a few years, the plant will be well on its way to deterioration with fewer culms growing each year, the root mass depleting the soil of nutrients, and the leaves curling up and turning yellow.

Legends

In China, it is said that spotted bamboo was born of the tears of bereaved wives. Emperor Yao gave two of his daughters to the future Emperor Shun as a test of his ability to rule. Shun was able to run his household with two wives, thus passing Yao’s test and assuming the throne in place of Yao’s unworthy son. When Shun drowned in the Xiang River, his wives’ tears fell upon the bamboos there, creating spotted bamboo. The women later became goddesses.

If your curiosity hasn’t been satisfied yet, China Travels welcomes you to discover more about the beautiful Asian landscape for yourself. Journey to China today!

 

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Teas of China

On July 11, 2011, in Featured China Stories, Restaurants & Food, by Jack Li

It’s hot, it’s cold, it’s calming, it’s rejuvenating… it’s tea! Taste the wonderful properties of Chinese tea for yourself today and book a flight to China. Better yet, ask your expert tour guide on China Tours for his or her suggestions on where to find this elixir of Asia. History Legend holds that tea was […]

It’s hot, it’s cold, it’s calming, it’s rejuvenating… it’s tea! Taste the wonderful properties of Chinese tea for yourself today and book a flight to China. Better yet, ask your expert tour guide on China Tours for his or her suggestions on where to find this elixir of Asia.

History

Legend holds that tea was discovered by Emperor Shennong in 2737 BCE. When a servant was boiling the emperor’s drinking water, a dried leaf from a tea bush fell into the water. The emperor drank the leaf-infused water and found it refreshing, marking the invention of tea, known as chá in Chinese.

According to Tang Dynasty writer Lu Yu’s Cha Jing, around CE 760, tea drinking was already widespread. The process of tea preparation at this time was very different from current methods. Tea leaves were pressed into cake form (brick tea) and ground in stone mortar. The powdered teacake was then either boiled in a kettle or added to hot water to be consumed.

In the mid-13th century, tea leaves began to be roasted rather than steamed, marking the origin of today’s loose teas and the practice of brewed tea.

Health

Tea has long been touted as a remedy for all sorts of bodily ailments, but is there any science behind these claims? Yes!

Tea has been shown to have positive effects in many areas. The following is a small sample: anti-cancer, mental alertness, bad breath, bacterial and fungal infections, stroke, cardiovascular health, weight loss, stress hormone levels, and HIV.

Studies have shown that adding milk may block some of the normal, healthful effects of tea. However, plant-based milks, such as soy milk, do not seem to have these effects on tea. Citrus, on the other hand, has been found to increase some healthful effects of tea.

Chinese Pu'er tea with a certificate verifying its age and region of origin

Kinds

Categories of Chinese tea include white, green, oolong, and black. Within these categories, the variety of individual beverages numbers up to 1,000.

One type of tea unique to China is Pu’er tea, a variety of post-fermented tea produced in Yunnan province. After leaves are dried and rolled, they undergo a microbial fermentation process. Certain selections from both the raw and ripened versions of Pu’er tea can be matured – that is why some are labeled with year and region of production.

Try it!

Tea-loving travelers to China should visit a tea house during their stay to experience this fundamental piece of Chinese culture. Here is one tea house in the Beijing area:

Dr. Tea

No.1, Min Zu Yuan Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing

Phone number: +86 (010) 82083648

Don’t miss out on this fantastic cultural experience! Come to China with China Travels today!

 

 

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Music to My Ears

On July 8, 2011, in Featured China Stories, by Jack Li

From the trills of opera to the shrieking guitars of rock stars, the Chinese music industry has it all. But the Chinese music scene hasn’t always been so diverse. The New Culture Movement of the 1910s and 1920s planted the country’s first seeds of interest in Western music. Today, lyrics and performances that were once […]

From the trills of opera to the shrieking guitars of rock stars, the Chinese music industry has it all. But the Chinese music scene hasn’t always been so diverse. The New Culture Movement of the 1910s and 1920s planted the country’s first seeds of interest in Western music. Today, lyrics and performances that were once labeled rebellious are generally accepted. If simply reading about this evolution of Oriental music culture isn’t enough for you, don’t hesitate to hop on a flight to China and book a China hotel to experience it for yourself!

Traditional

Music, or yīnyuè in Chinese, was long considered one of the four fundamental societal functions. Every feudal state, dynasty, and republic throughout Chinese history established an official music organization to pay homage to this idea. In fact, China is home to the earliest musical scale in recorded history! Artists have historically organized their music around the distinctive minor third interval. The aesthetics of traditional Chinese music have proven astoundingly resistant to the ravages of time.

The Age of Confucius saw the greatest realization of these musical aesthetics. As major principalities competed to attract artists, scholars, diplomats, engineers, and musicians to their courts, human capital was increasingly invested in creative endeavors. Advancements in the science of acoustics furthered the art of music-making.

Below are examples of traditional Chinese instruments:

Dizi, bamboo flute

 

 

 

 

 

Guqin, seven-stringed zither, “Instrument of the Sages”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erhu, spike fiddle

 

 

 

 

 

Paigu, tuned wooden drums

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese opera, especially the Beijing opera, has been popular throughout the centuries. Opera music is performed with high-pitched vocals and accompanied by various traditional instruments.

Modern

The transition from traditional to modern music was a rocky ordeal spanning multiple decades. The founding of the New China in 1912 marked initial, tenuous contact with Western music. At various high points during the revolutionary age, musical composition and performance were severely restricted or manipulated by the government to promote pro-Communist ideology.

The 1970s saw the rise of cantopop in Hong Kong and mandopop in Taiwan, but mainland China denounced this Western influenced music as “rebellious.” Even into the 1990s, Anita Mui was banned from the mainland concert stage for performing a dance choreography based on the style of Madonna. Only recently have Chinese youth become consumers in the popular music market. China is still not considered a major production or consumption hub for popular music.

Since the end of the 20th century, pop music in mainland China has been gaining popularity. Many mainland Chinese artists begin with commercial success in Hong Kong or Taiwan and attempt to re-introduce themselves into mainland China.

Below are examples of modern day Chinese artists:

Cui Jian, “The Father of Chinese Rock” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faye Wong, “Best Selling Cantopop Female” (Guinness Book of World Records)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S.H.E., Taiwanese girl group

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fahrenheit, Taiwanese boy band

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, popular Chinese musical genres include not only pop music, but also hip hop and rap, rock and heavy metal, and various alternative genres.

What are you waiting for? Travel to Beijing and hear the famous Beijing Opera for yourself! If nothing else, just slip on a pair of headphones and rock out to some modern day C-pop — your ears will thank you.

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Xi’an-The capital of the past

After the two main cities Beijing and Shanghai, tourists cannot miss out Xian which is certainly one of the main China destinations. It is possible to get there with the night train from Beijing which provides beds during the trip or for those who are looking for an easier way to get there flights are […]

After the two main cities Beijing and Shanghai, tourists cannot miss out Xian which is certainly one of the main China destinations. It is possible to get there with the night train from Beijing which provides beds during the trip or for those who are looking for an easier way to get there flights are available at China Flight. Xi’an Xianyang International Airport is located 40km northwest of the city centre, and flight are available from all the major cities Xi’an Flights.

Xi’an also famous as Chang’an during ancient times is dated back more than 3,000 years, indeed, for the duration of 1,000 years (13 dynasties with a total of 73 emperors) the city was the capital of China. Xi’an sits at the root of the Chinese civilization mainly because it served the Country as capital during four major dynasties such as Qin, Han, Tang and Zhou. For this reason the city offers the opportunity to discover its historical background thanks to several museum, relicts, historical ruins and culture. Furthermore the city during the past represented an inevitable destination for traders as Xi’an was located at the eastern terminus of the Silk Road. Traders from all over the world, visiting the old Chinese capital were inspired by new ideas of good exchange, sales, bringing them back to their native countries. The city host the terracotta warriors which it worth the price of the visit itself, also it has often been said that “if you have not visited Xi’an you have not been to China”.

The Xi’an tourist attractions can be classified into two categories according to their location, inside (near) the city or outside the city. Inside the city is possible to enjoy the city wall which is the largest in the world, is big enough that it is easily possible to ride five bikes contemporary across it. The view from the top of battlements and towers of the wall is really enjoyable; in addition tourist can experience the city wall history thanks to its museum situated at Hanguang. However if tourists want to engage with the whole wall tour, it is strongly advised to hire a bike at the South or East gate, as it takes five hours walking on average. Within the city is also possible to admire the Shaanxi Provincial Museum defined as one of the China best museum essentially because it’ s well preserved collection that includes relics starting from Neolithic all the way through the Qing dynasty. Nearby is situated the Shaanxi Forest of Steles, it is characterized by a collection of more than 2,300 stones tablets dating back the 7th century. On top of it The inside of the city includes the Wolong Temple, the two Goose Pagoda, the bell Tower, the drum tower and the eight Immortal Temple.

On the other hand the outside of the city of Xi’an offers as many attractions to visit as the Inside, Tour available at Xi’an Tour. The Army of Terracotta Warriors represents the Xi’an as the attraction is one of the main must-see in China and is one of the main purposes to visit the area. This site is part of the UNESCO cultural heritage since 1987 and successively labelled as 8 wonders of the world it is absolutely impressive how 8’000 soldiers have been reproduced on perfect details. Next to the army is possible to visit the museum which will help tourist to inform tourist about the army history. Certainly most of the tourist when visiting Xi’an their attention is focused the terracotta warriors but the city surroundings; provide several attractions such as the 6,000 years old ruins of a village and the Buddhist Famen temple home of the biggest treasure of one of Buddha’s finger offered to the Emperor of China during Tank Dynasty.

Tourists should include Xi’an on their trip to China as it builds a fundamental background making the whole middle East culture more understandable.

Qin Shi Huang and his Terracotta warriors

On June 13, 2011, in Must-sees, Terracotta Warriors, Travel Info, Xi'an, by Jack Li

Beijing is a city filled with lots of fascinating sites, many being traditional and historical. Visitors do their Beijing Travel and book their China Flights without knowing the history of China’s second largest city. It was during the QinDynasty (221 BC) Beijing established Qin Shi Huang, as their first emperor of the Qin Dynasty. Formerly […]

Beijing is a city filled with lots of fascinating sites, many being traditional and historical. Visitors do their Beijing Travel and book their China Flights without knowing the history of China’s second largest city. It was during the QinDynasty (221 BC) Beijing established Qin Shi Huang, as their first emperor of the Qin Dynasty. Formerly named Ying Zheng then later on Qin Shi Huang, went on to rule for 35years. Qin Shi was known for his magnificent and intelligent projects.

Legend has it that Qin Shi was not birthed from a prince but was already conceived by a merchant and his wife. It was then said that a merchant named Lu Buwei arranged for his already pregnant wife Zhao Ji to meet the then prince of the Eastern Zhou Dynasty (770-256 B.C.). The prince met Zhao Ji and made her his concubine, she then gave birth to Lu Buwei’s child in 259 B.C.  The price believed the child was his, thirteen years later the prince died which made his supposed child the King of the Qin state. The young king ruled at the tender age of thirteen with the prime minister at his side who was said to be his actual father “Lu Buwei”. Lu Buwei also acted as the regent for the first eight years of Qin Shi Huang ruling.

Lu Buwei tried to seize power by planning a coup while Qin Shi Huang was out of the area. A failed attempt ended up with Lu Buwei being banished and his associate and associate’s family being executed. Lu Buwei then committed suicide in 235 B.C. by drinking poison. After the death of Lu Buwei, Qin Shi Huang was taken over by a case of paranoia with that he banished all foreign scholars from his court.  After numerous attempts for his death Qin Shi Huang made it through.

The next on coming years Qin Shi Huang dealt with battling through the neighboring states, unifying China and starting the Great Wall and Ling Canal. As Qin Shi Huang began to hit his middle ages, he grew more and more afraid of death. Qin Shi became obsessed with finding a way to preserve his life. Qin Shi thought he could some how create something that would make him live forever. Many doctors and alchemists invented a number of potions, many of the potions contained mercury which probably quicken his death rather then lengthen his life. The Emperor requested that the construction of a gargantuan tomb would be made.

Qin Shi Huang wanted to have soldiers in the afterworld to protect him, and maybe allow him to conquer heaven as he had in China. Qin Shi also asked that a Terracotta army of at least 8,000 clay soldiers be placed in the tomb. The army must also included terracotta horses, along with real chariots and weapons. The warriors were created; each soldier had an individual and unique facial feature. The bodies and limbs were mass-produced from molds. If you would like to visit the Terracotta warriors you can by just visiting China Travel and taking a look trough the offered tours.

Duānwǔjié =The Dragon Boat Festival & Zòngzi

On June 10, 2011, in Cultural Experience, Festivals, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

When you think of a festival do the words dragon or boat come to mind? Well book any one of China Tours and come experience the many festivals that China has to offer. This past weekend the Dragon Boat Festival which is also called (Duānwǔjié Festival) took place at most lakes and waterways. The origin […]

When you think of a festival do the words dragon or boat come to mind? Well book any one of China Tours and come experience the many festivals that China has to offer. This past weekend the Dragon Boat Festival which is also called (Duānwǔjié Festival) took place at most lakes and waterways. The origin of the Dragon Boat Festival originated during (475-221BC). Officially the Dragon Boat Festival falls on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month, which is why the Festival is also known as the double fifth day. People all over the world book their Beijing Fights around this festival and here is why. This fascinating festival derives from the death of Qu Yuan, who was a minister he was said to have committed suicide by drowning himself in a river.

Qu Yuan, during the Warring States Period was the minister of the State of Chu. Qu was described as loyal, upright, and looked up upon for his wise ways in council that eventually brought peace and prosperity to the state. Qu was belittled by a Prince in the State of Chu, it made him shamed he then dismissed himself from his title. It is said when Qu Yuan realized that his country was not longer in a pure state he grabbed a stone and jumped into the Miluo River on the fifth day of the fifth month. Not to long after the State of  Chu was then conquered by the State of Qin. Qu Yuan was greatly loved by many the people who mourned his death. Every year on the fifth day of the fifth month they proceeded to throw rice into the river to feed his ghost. One year it was said that the spirit of Qu Yuan appeared and told his mourners that a huge dragon had taken the rice. The spirit of Qu Yuan then advised his mourners to wrap the rice in silk and bind it with five different colored threads before tossing it into the river.

The festive wraps in modern days are filled with a glutinous rice pudding which is called Zòngzi. To create Zòngzi you will need Lotus seeds, Chestnuts, Pork fat, Yolk of an egg and of course rice. To finalize the wrap you would then mix together and proceed to wrap with bamboo leaves, and tie it with the thick thread followed by then boiling in salt water for hours.

The Dragon Boat races were created to symbolize the numerous attempts to find Qu Yuan’s body. A typical Dragon Boat race would range from 50-100 feet in length. The “boat” also called a beam would be measured at approximately 6 feet which includes two paddles that are placed side by side. To decorate the bow of the beam a wooden dragon head is attached follow by a dragon tail at the stern. Some boats carry a colorful banner that is hoisted onto a pole which is then strapped to the stern. The centers of more traditional boats canopies  are places where the gongs are placed.

This beautiful festival is held amongst different villages, organizations and clans in China. The winners are awarded medals, jugs of wine, meals and banners. By just reading this blog, this mystical and traditional festival can not be understood until you are apart of it yourself. You can be apart of China’s many festivals not much planning needed, you can start your China Travel now. China welcomes you with open arms.

Chinese History

On November 5, 2010, in Cool Places, Featured China Stories, by Jack Li

In the early period of China’s known existence, civilization was scarce due to the vast deserts, mountains, and seas.  For century’s China was isolated from other parts of the world which gives an insight to the origins of Chinese culture and evidently is still seen today. If this is for you then a China Tour or […]

In the early period of China’s known existence, civilization was scarce due to the vast deserts, mountains, and seas.  For century’s China was isolated from other parts of the world which gives an insight to the origins of Chinese culture and evidently is still seen today. If this is for you then a China Tour or China Flights is recommended for the best deals.

Map of China

There is too much history in China to even attempt to write in a blog, so I will focus on points of history I believe to be some of the most interesting and unique. It begins in 2200 BC in the Xia Dynasty, followed by the Shang Dynasty, then West Han Dynasty and East Han Dynasty centuries went by.

  • Modern China during 1644-1911  was rules under the Qing Dynasty in which the capital city of Beijing was founded. During this time was the building of Summer Palace by Empress Dowager Cixi in 1888.
  • It was only until 1911 that communism in china began to grow after the Qing Dynasty.
  • In 1925 did the Forbidden City be allowed to the public as a historic Museum after thousands of years of being hidden from the world.
  • In 1974, a huge discovery of the Terra Cotta Warriors and horses were found in Xi’an, a major world treasure about Chinese culture.
  • In 1987,  the Great Wall and Forbidden City as World Cultural Heritages.
  • In October 1949 the People’s Republic of China became established into Chinese history.

Summer Palace

Lets not forget the most recent achievement to be the Beijing Olympics in 2008, which proved the to the world that China is a great place to visit. As China becomes ever more modern in its own rapidly growing economy, it is the best time to go here and explore the opportunities it can bring.

It is an exciting time in China right now so book your China Flights right now!


A tour of the Beijing Hutongs

On October 15, 2010, in Beijing, Cool Places, Cultural Experience, Tours, Travel Info, by Jack Li

As part of your China Tours, don”t miss a trip to the Hutongs – a great way to escape the hustle and bustle of the city and experience an important part of Chinese culture and history. You can do this trip either independently or take an organized tour for a more informative experience, check out Beijing Tours for more information. The Hutongs […]

As part of your China Tours, don”t miss a trip to the Hutongs – a great way to escape the hustle and bustle of the city and experience an important part of Chinese culture and history. You can do this trip either independently or take an organized tour for a more informative experience, check out Beijing Tours for more information.

The Hutongs are a network of narrow streets or alleyways within the city; a neighbourhood of shops, restaurants and homes set away from the main roads, skyscrapers and apartment buildings of modern China. It is here that you will find the traditional courtyard residences, known as siheyuan, along the alleys which form the heart of Old Beijing and its traditions.     

An example of the traditional courtyard residences

  In ancient China the majority of the population used to live in these residential areas, often according to social class. However, over time the number of hutongs in Beijing has dramatically decreased as they have been replaced by new roads and buildings and many residents have left their family homes in favour of modern facilities and apartment buildings. 

A Beijing Hutong

 And so I highly recommend a trip to the Hutongs in order to see this interesting aspect of Chinese cultural history preserved by the communities who have lived this way for online casino generations. There are many Hutongs to choose from, scattered all over the city. One of the more historically famous Hutongs is Liulichang Culture Street, located in Xuanwu District, which is full of Chinese ancient treasures. The street”s name can be literally translated as  “Beijing Colored Glaze Factory Street” which gives a hint to its role in the past. The factory then became an antique market and today its shops sell  jewellery, calligraphy, paintings, ancient books, tea and various other arts and crafts.    

The tea house in Liulichang

  If you are looking for PISCES – horoscopes leo : Fire and water don?t mix. a relaxing afternoon in the city, why not take online casino canada a stroll down these streets and wander into the different shops, you may even find the perfect gift for friends and family back home! I recommend going to the tea house where you can sit down and try a cup of one of their many flavours of tea and then buy it afterwards in the shop. There is also a workshop at the back where you can observe the men making the calligraphy brushes by hand.  

My friends sampling the tea in the Tea House

  

The workshop

 And if you are looking for cheaper gifts or something for yourself, head to the Chinese equivalent of a pound shop at the bottom of the street. It sells everything from jewellery to furniture and all for 10 Yuan – my highlight were the bangles and wooden chopsticks in display boxes, a great souvenir to represent your time in China. And as always, dont forget to haggle!

And so if you are interested in experiencing the Hutong culture in Beijing, why not start your adventure in Liulichang Culture Street and then continue to explore the many other Hutongs across the city. If you are looking for more ideas about what to do and where to go in China, check out china travel.

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