Anyone for Tea?

On September 19, 2011, in China Travel Gossip, Cultural Experience, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

It is virtually impossible to go on a China tour and not come across Chinese tea. From green tea to oolong tea, China ceases to amazing the palette with it’s variety of smells and tastes of tea. From Chinese shops to Chinese hotels, tea is everywhere. According to popular Chinese legend, tea was first discovered by the […]

It is virtually impossible to go on a China tour and not come across Chinese tea. From green tea to oolong tea, China ceases to amazing the palette with it’s variety of smells and tastes of tea. From Chinese shops to Chinese hotels, tea is everywhere.

According to popular Chinese legend, tea was first discovered by the Chinese Emperor Shennong in 2737 BCE when a leaf from a camellia sinensis tree fell into some water that the emperor was boiling. Today the camellia sinensis leaves are still used for Chinese tea. Traditionally there are 4 types of tea: white, green, oolong and black however it is thought that there are over 1,000 types of tea within these categories!

Chinese tea culture is so different to that of the western world. In China, tea is regularly consumed for casual and formal events as well as used in traditional Chinese medicine and cuisine.

Tea customs

There are many tea drinking customs to be aware of whilst you visit China which will help you liaise with the locals:

Sign of respect:  The younger generation should always show respect for their elders and offer them a cup of tea. This is also the case that the workers should offer tea to their boss. However in modern society in informal settings, bosses will make tea for their employees, it should not be expected.

To apologise: People make serious apologies by pouring tea for them and this shows a sign of regret and submission. i.e. a child will pour their parents tea if they have been disobedient.

 

Finger tapping: It is customary to thank the tea server for tea by knocking their bent index and middle fingers on the table to express thanks. This is a common way if you are in the middle of talking with someone at the table whilst tea is being served.

 

How to prepare the perfect cuppa

In order to make the perfect cup of Chinese tea, you can either place the loose tea leaves into a tea infuser, a teapot or a teacup. Then

 

you poor the hot water over the leaves and leave it for a couple of minutes. When the tea is ready to serve you either remove the infuser or strain the tea.

These are the ideal temperatures of water and steeping time for the 4 categories of Chinese tea:

White Tea (Between 65°C and 70°C)  1-2minutes steeping time
Green Tea (Between 75°C and 80°C) 1-2 minutes steeping time
Oolong Tea (Between 80°C and 85°C) 2-3 minutes steeping time
Black teak (99°C) 2-3 minutes steeping time

Eat cup of tea there should be a level teaspoon for white, green and oolong teas whilst black tea needs a rounded teaspoon.

Some teas are brewed several times using the same leaves. Chinese teas are divided into numerous infusions. The first is immediately poured out to was the tea. Every infusion after the first is drunk but the third to fifth infusions are considered the bests. However, different types of tea open up differently and may require more infusions.

 

China tea can come in a variety of weird and wonderful colours and can either be hot or cold. Your China travels are not complete without a sip of tea!

Qianfo Rock

On July 19, 2011, in Guilin, Towers, Pagodas & Grottoes, by Jack Li

Qianfo Rock (Thousand Buddha rock) is situated on the hillside of Fubo Hill, next to the Huanzhu cave. Constituting of three floors, its total area is 133 square meters. 400 Buddha statues stand there, including 239 bas-reliefs attributed to the Dang dynasty.  Most of the statues belong to late Tang dynasty. Each of the statues […]

Qianfo Rock (Thousand Buddha rock) is situated on the hillside of Fubo Hill, next to the Huanzhu cave. Constituting of three floors, its total area is 133 square meters. 400 Buddha statues stand there, including 239 bas-reliefs attributed to the Dang dynasty.  Most of the statues belong to late Tang dynasty. Each of the statues depicts Buddha in plain clothes, with facial contours and moderate posture. They are the powerful testimony of the makers’ professionalism and the piety of the Buddha followers from Tang dynasty.  The most precious work is the self-portrait of Mifu, one of the most prominent calligraphers of Northern Song Dynasty.  The 1.2m high self-portrait carved on the wall, shows Mifu looking perfectly calm, natural and unrestrained.  Mifu visited Guilin in 1074, when he finished his painting entitled “picture of Yangshuo Mountain”. He is said to be the first artist to paint a landscape of Guilin.

Fubo Hill

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China Travel Blog is on Mobiles !

On April 6, 2011, in China Travel Gossip, by Jack Li

Thanks to the launching of the awesome plug-ins WPtouch, ChinaTravelDept.com  is able to present her blog content to the main stream of mobile platforms! This plug-ins automatically transforms the blog content  into an iPhone application-style theme, complete with ajax loading articles and effects, when viewed from iPhone, iPod touch, Android, Palm Pre, Samsung touch and BlackBerry Storm/Torch mobile devices. […]

Thanks to the launching of the awesome plug-ins WPtouch, ChinaTravelDept.com  is able to present her blog content to the main stream of mobile platforms!

This plug-ins automatically transforms the blog content  into an iPhone application-style theme, complete with ajax loading articles and effects, when viewed from iPhone, iPod touch, Android, Palm Pre, Samsung touch and BlackBerry Storm/Torch mobile devices.

So, enjoy your reading of our blog while you are on the go!

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Best China’s Airports Earn Unravelled Flight Experience

On April 6, 2011, in China Travel Gossip, Travel Info, by Jack Li

According to the 2010 report released by Airports Council International, Asian airports occupied all of the seats of world’s five best airports, among which Beijing Capital International Airport ranked the fourth place and Shanghai Pudong International Airport fifth. This shows China, initiated by the major airline hubs, has developed a very sophisticated air flight system […]

According to the 2010 report released by Airports Council International, Asian airports occupied all of the seats of world’s five best airports, among which Beijing Capital International Airport ranked the fourth place and Shanghai Pudong International Airport fifth. This shows China, initiated by the major airline hubs, has developed a very sophisticated air flight system in terms of either domestic travels or international connections. Three of the China’s leading airports, shown as below, ensure pleasures of China Flights on your China Tours.

Beijing Capital International Airport is the principal airport of Beijing and the busiest civilian airport in China, and meanwhile, the headquarter of Air China. It once replaced Tokyo Haneda Airport as the busiest airport in Asian and listed among the four busiest airports in Asia, together with Hong Kong, Bangkok and Tokyo in 2004. The same year, the third terminal building started to be built and opened into use before Beijing 2008 Olympics after four years’ construction. It is the largest independent terminal building, as large as 170 soccer fields. Since then, Beijing Capital Airport became the first one nationwide with three terminal buildings, two control towers and three aerodrome runways in service coinstantaneously.

Beijing Capital International Airport is an important portal of entry for foreign exchanges, being the center of network of China Civil Aviation. At present, it has 98 domestic flights to 91 cities of the country and 101 international flights to 76 cities outside China. Compared with this crucial transportation hub in Northeast Asia, the other airport in Beijing, Nanyuan Airport is small. It is for both military and civilian use. There are domestic flights only, heading for some major cities like Hangzhou, Guangzhou, Haikou, Sanya, Chongqing, Changsha and some smaller place, such as Foshan, Linyi, Fuyang, Ordos, Baotou, Quzhou, Yulin, Lianyungang, Changzhou, Hailar and Manchuria.

There are two international airports in one city. This fact makes Shanghai outstanding as the largest city in China. Pudong International Airport play more important role. At present, it has three runways, two terminal buildings, 218 gate positions and 70 boarding walkways. It is affordable an annual passenger throughput of 60 million. There are averagely 700 flights of departure or arrival in one day, making up some 60 percent of Shanghai airports’ total flights amount. It includes the direct flights to New York by US Continental Airlines, Mexico by Mexicana Airlines, Zurich by Swiss International Airlines and Atlanta by Delta Airlines. Over 60 Chinese and overseas airlines set up business here. The flight network covers over 90 cities and regions outside China and more than 70 domestic cities.

15 airlines have scheduled flights to Hongqiao Airport, among which China Eastern Airlines, Shanghai Airlines and Spring Airlines are headquartered at this airport. It connects Shanghai with more than 60 cities in China and chartered flights to two cities in Japan and South Korea.

At the joint area of Renhe Town in Baiyun District and Xinhua Town in Huadu District, Guangzhou Baiyun Airport is about 28 kilometers from the central downtown of Guangzhou, Haizhu Square. It is one of the three air transportation hub in China. There are totally 123 scheduled flights, and 86 flights of them are domestic. Every day, there are more than five hundred flight taking off and landing. In the end of 2007, the annual passenger throughput in Guangzhou Airport reached 31 million, far beyond the expectation before the new airport was settled down in 2004. China Southern Airlines and Shenzhen Airlines choose the airport as their headquarters.

The airport is located in the center area of Asia-Pacific region. Major cities worldwide can be reached in 15 hours from Guangzhou. Its network covers South and Southeast Asian, being an important traffic hub to go to Vietnam, Laos, Burma, India, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. In addition, there are flights to Melbourne and Sydney of Australia, Paris, Los Angeles and Lagos of Nigerian, connecting flight to Amsterdam via Beijing and some flight to Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya of Japan, Seoul of Korea, etc. China Southern Airlines has most domestic and international flights here.

Chinese Paper Cutting Art

On March 30, 2011, in China Travel Gossip, Cultural Experience, Featured China Stories, by Jack Li

Come to china travel, you must see some special skills. Today we will maily talk about the Chianese paper cutting art. During your China Tours you can visit the Dingxi city, in Gansu Province where it is the home of the Chinese Paper Cutting.Chinese Paper Cutting or Jianzhi (Chinese: 剪纸, jiǎn zhǐ) is the first […]

Come to china travel, you must see some special skills. Today we will maily talk about the Chianese paper cutting art. During your China Tours you can visit the Dingxi city, in Gansu Province where it is the home of the Chinese Paper Cutting.Chinese Paper Cutting or Jianzhi (Chinese: 剪纸, jiǎn zhǐ) is the first type of papercutting design, since paper was invented by Cai Lun in the Eastern Han Dynasty in China. Because the cut outs are also used to decorate doors and windows, they are sometimes referred to “chuāng huā” (窗花), meaning Window Flower.

From the 7th to 13th century, paper cutting became popular especially during Chinese holiday festivals. The art spread to the rest of the world in the 14th century. Throughout the Qing Dynasty many papercutting skills were developed including drafting and the use of smoked papers. By the end of the Qing ruling however, new art forms were being introduced. The Republic of China later tried to revive the art in the 1980s.

In the rural countryside in mainland China, papercutting is a traditionally female activity. In the past, every girl was expected to master it and brides were often judged by their skill. Professional papercutting artists are, on the other hand, usually male and have guaranteed incomes and work together in workshops.

Today, papercuttings are chiefly decorative. They ornament walls, windows, doors, columns, mirrors, lamps and lanterns in homes and are also used on presents or are given as gifts themselves. Entrances are decorated with paper cut outs are supposed to bring good luck. Papercuttings used to be used as patterns, especially for embroidery and lacquer work.

In Chinese culture it can reflect many aspects of life such as prosperity, health, or harvest. Some cuttings represent stories about the happiness gained from the accomplishment of common goals.

There are two methods of manufacture: one use scissors, the other use knives. In the scissor method, several pieces of paper — up to eight — are fastened together. The motif is then cut with sharp, pointed scissors.Knife cuttings are fashioned by putting several layers of paper on a relatively soft foundation consisting of a mixture of tallow and ashes. Following a pattern, the artist cuts the motif into the paper with a sharp knife which is usually held vertically. Skilled crafters can even cut out different drawings freely without stopping.

It is easy to learn about cutting a piece of paper but very difficult to master it with perfection. One must grasp the knife in an upright fashion and press evenly on the paper with some strength. Flexibility is required but any hesitation or wiggling will lead to imprecision or damage the whole image. Engravers stress the cutting lines in several styles. They attempt to carve a circle like the moon, a straight line like a stem of wheat, a square like a brick, and jaggedly like the beard.

People find hope and comfort in expressing wishes with paper cuttings. For example: for a wedding ceremony, red paper cuttings are a traditional and required decoration on the tea set, the dressing table glass, and on other furniture. A big red paper character ‘Xi’ (happiness) is a traditional must on the newlywed’s door. Upon the birthday party of a senior, the character ‘Shou’ represents longevity and will add delight to the whole celebration; while a pattern of plump children cuddling fish signifies that every year they will be abundant in wealth. You can enjoy the beautiful mankind miracle, so quickly come to china by Air China or China Airlines.

Experience Night Beijing at the Donghuamen Street Market

On February 28, 2011, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Nightlife, by Jack Li

Before you come to Beijing, you surely have heard of the Forbidden City, the Great Wall, or the Summer Palace, and the alike. While Beijing, a city of abundant historical treasures, also has a dynamic night life. The street market is a part of this unique night culture of Beijing Tours. Donghuamen night market, down-town […]

Before you come to Beijing, you surely have heard of the Forbidden City, the Great Wall, or the Summer Palace, and the alike. While Beijing, a city of abundant historical treasures, also has a dynamic night life. The street market is a part of this unique night culture of Beijing Tours. Donghuamen night market, down-town located north of the famous Wangfujing pedestrian promenade, is one of the most popular night markets that collects various snacks from all around China. If you are going to Travel to Beijing, add Donghuamen to your list of the “must-see” besides those antique sightseeings!

Speaking of the origin of Donghuamen night market, its history traces back to the Donghuamen market thirty years ago, even before the neighborhood of Wangfujing became a commercial center of this city. Dubbed as the best gourmet street in Beijing, Donghuamen enjoyed high reputation among both native “Beijingers” and tourists. The street opens at around 4:00 PM everyday beginning with the stalls along the street setting up. The turnover reaches the highest at 7 or 8 PM as the street becomes more and more crowded in the evening.

What makes Donghuamen distinct from other street markets is the great diversity of its foods. There are a wide variety of foods available, from scorpions to seahorses. By all means come here and eat the scorpion, the sea star, the seahorse, the chicken hearts, the cow stomach, the shark, the silk worm, the centipede, the octopus tentacles on a stick and all that good stuff.Explore the limits of your taste buds or courage at least. You will find many animals not on western menus. Bugs to snakes but there are also many of vegetables, fruits, and chicken available. Don’t worry about the cat and dog, those are actually delicacies and it would not be substituted for any kind of cheap meat. There are more to eat than just fried insects, and unmentionable creatures. Most of them are fried and oily. Some of the stall selling beef balls and fish balls in soup and it’s delicious and healthy. If you are a vegetarian, don’t worry! Lots of cut up fruit too! They string the fruits on a stick and coat with candy. It is easier to fall for the haw par fruit (or the Chinese calls it San Char or Bing Tang Hu Lu—crystalized sugar coated haws). Whilst the prices are higher than in many other street markets in Beijing, the food looked a much better quality and also very fresh. This place is a safe bet for some good food, and the prices are still comparatively low by western standards.

Donghuamen night market is not only a great way to try a variety food but also a good location you can hang around at downtown Beijing, stalls lined next to each other with anything you could want to try in China. There are some shops to explore around the market that are more brand names and not the knock off shops. If you can’t find something to eat here, there are options around the market.

The market can be seen in a mere fifteen minutes and the pictures are worth it as well as the experience of eating your first beetle. We explored this interesting market one night. Although we opted against trying the Seahorse kabobs, it was a great photo opportunity and worthwhile gastronomic adventure.

No Beijing Tours are complete without a trip and an adventure down a food street!

China Travel Visa

On December 27, 2010, in China Travel Gossip, by Jack Li

Opportunities with china travel, planning to sightsee or work . Whatever your motivations are?  To take on a city break in China has never been easier. Trying to find a visa can be found with plenty of details online about, China Visa requirements.  They include instructions and information on how to successfully acquire a Visa […]

Opportunities with china travel, planning to sightsee or work . Whatever your motivations are?  To take on a city break in China has never been easier. Trying to find a visa can be found with plenty of details online about, China Visa requirements.  They include instructions and information on how to successfully acquire a Visa for China and before you apply for a visa, search China Hotels for reasonable and discounted rates.

Passport requirements: You must have a valid passport to visit China.  Your passport must have blank visa pages with a Chinese Visa.  Your passport must have a minimum of at least 6 months before expiring.  Business and student passports must have at least 12 months before expiration.

China Visas

Visa Type: The most common of visas is the L visa.  All tourists are provided L visas when they visit China for sightseeing trips.  Business visas require letters of invitation from a Chinese or state owned business or government agency.  Tourists who want to travel to different parts of China that are not open to outsiders must apply for a travel visa once they arrive in China.  A student visa requires an application form for international students issued by the Ministry of Education of  China, and an admission letter with a proper school seal are required.

Photos:  In China they will accept black and white as well as colour, 2 x 2 photographs with your application.  These photos must be recent and be included with your visa application.

Forms: Declaration forms and L visa forms are available online.  These forms can be printed and filled out before scheduling your appointment at the Chinese Embassy or consulate.  China now requires a Declaration Form.  This form is also available online and should accompany your request for a visa application.

Expedite: Expediting service for a Chinese visa is handled by a travel-agent expeditor.  These people charge a fee for their services.  These fees start at £25 and go up from there.

China

Fees: China has a set fee for visa applications.  Cash or bank draft in the amount of £84 must be brought with you to an appointment or a money order.

Additional Requirements: In order to process your visa application you must verify your round trip travel tickets, your hotel reservation and check your application and declaration form and you must provide your own prepaid mailing envelope. Express mail is preferred by the Chinese government and other companies such as UPS and FEdEx are the companies that they prefer to use when returning your documents.  It is also important to include a cover letter that states that you are trying to obtain a visa, what is included in the prepaid return mailing envelope with your name, address and telephone numbers included.

If you are having problems with the China visa requirements you can call the embassy or consulate.  So travel now and experience China Tours.

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Entertainment In China

Now I’m not a big singer, in fact it’s safe to say that I have no musical talent at all, even though I love listening to it. But when you are next on your China Tours a visiting karaoke bar should be on your list of things to do. They are amazing and so much […]

Now I’m not a big singer, in fact it’s safe to say that I have no musical talent at all, even though I love listening to it. But when you are next on your China Tours a visiting karaoke bar should be on your list of things to do. They are amazing and so much fun. Going to a karaoke bar (known as KTV) has been one of my most entertaining experiences since being on my Beijing Tours.  

                Now these bars are nothing like the ones you get back in the UK. They are elegant, sophisticated, and if your shy, they are totally private. There is no daunting feeling of getting up on stage and blasting out a rendition of “I don’t Wanna Close My Eyes” by AeroSmith, “It’s My Life” by Bon Jovi or other such classics in front of complete strangers, this is because all the booths are private. So the only people who will listen to you sing are your friends, who let’s face it, can’t sing any better than you even though they think they can.

                If you need a little Dutch courage before you get up on stage this is no problem, the alcohol I cheap, a Heineken costing around 11 Yuan (£1.10) so you can get yourself tipsy very easily to loosen up those vocal cords. Most KTV’s will offer a buffet with your entertainment experience.

This is something I would definitely recommend, especially with a big group of friends as this is a lot less strain on your voice. I had so much fun at one of these that people had to drag the microphone out of my hand so that they could have a turn at singing. The rooms are extremely comfortable each with their own private lavatory so that you do not have to miss a moment more of the action than is necessary. Like all Karaoke’s though the highlighted words do appear on the screen slightly slower than the song itself. No worries though, you are there to have fun, not to make sure that you are in perfect time with the songs. The only disappointing part of the evening was that they didn’t have “It’s All Coming Back to Me Now” by Céline Dion, but, if this is the song you desperately  want to sing then I’m sure you can find it at one of the places.

KTV bars can be found all over China, keep an eye out for them as they can be deceiving from the outside. Some of them can look like hotels and this may put you off, but don’t let that fool you. The service is outstanding; if you decide to buy an alcoholic beverage whilst you are here they will insist on carrying it into the room for you, they will show you how to operate the Karaoke machine, as naturally it is in Chinese, and they are not strict on making sure you leave when your time is up.

So when you are next on your Beijing tours stop by your local KTV and enjoy an evening with good friends who delight in singing and having a good time.

Information China—Eating In Tibet

On December 6, 2010, in China Travel Gossip, Cultural Experience, by Jack Li

Due to its special geographic position, the landscape in Tibet is nothing similar to the rest of the country, and its culture is also different from the mainstream culture of China. Have a travel to Tibet and embark on an entirely new experience of China travel.  What to eat is always a big concern of […]

Due to its special geographic position, the landscape in Tibet is nothing similar to the rest of the country, and its culture is also different from the mainstream culture of China.

Have a travel to Tibet and embark on an entirely new experience of China travel.

 What to eat is always a big concern of our trip planning. Want to know what to eat and drink in Tibet? Check them out!

 The Characteristics of Tibet Cuisine

Tibet is a land of contrasts with rough terrain and a harsh climate which have affected the development of the region’s peculiar and scarce cuisine, which is based primarily on toasted barley flour, wheat flour as well as mutton and beef.

Tibetan food shows a major influence of Indian and Chinese methods of cooking

Traditional Tibetan food includes tsamba (roasted highland barley flour), thukpa, butter tea, Tibetan sausages, yak jerky, momo, and milk tea.

Tsamba

Tsamba, the staple food of Tibetan people, is a kind of dough made with roasted highland barley flour and yak butter with water. Method of making: grind the roasted Highland Barley into flour, and mix it with ghee. It is similar to parching wheat flour in northern China. People in northern China grind the wheat into flour before parching it, but Tibetan people do the opposite. They roast the barley seeds before grinding them into flour. What’s more, Tibetan people do not remove the husk of the barley.

When eating Tsamba, Tibetan people put some ghee in a bowl, pour some boiled water into the bowl, then put some roasted flour into the water, and mix them with one hand. When mixing the tea, they press the flour slightly against the edge of the bowl with their fingers to avoid spilling the tea. After mixing all the roasted flour, the tea and the ghee until the thing gets thick, people knead it into dough balls and eat them.

The Tibetan people often bring barley flour with them in small leather bags when they leave home to do business.

Thukpa

Thukpa is a noodle soup typically eaten for lunch or dinner. It includes thick noodles, boiled spinach, and bits of mutton, pork, or yak beef. One popular version of this soup, called Tenthuk, uses small chunks of pasta made from pulled noodles. A large bowl of this warm, filling noodle soup is tasty on a cold night.

 

Tibetan sausages

Sausage was early from more than 1000 years a ago. It is a food created by nomad. The main method is to prime different materials into the fresh animal guts such as sheep, pig or cow.

The Tibetan sausages can be either steamed or roasted and then cut into slices to eat. Tibetans usually make this food in batches during new-year time. The Tibetan sausage taste fresh and goluptious and not oily, which is a nice cold dish. Then it can be stored for about one year.

 

butter tea

Butter tea is made by mixing brick tea, ghee and salt together. Ghee, which looks like butter, is a kind of dairy product of fat abstracted from cow milk or sheep milk. Tibetan people like the ghee made of yak milk. When they make buttered tea, they mix boiled brick tea and ghee in a special can, add some salt, pour the mixed liquid into a pottery or metal teapot and finally heat up the buttered tea (but not boil it).

According to the Tibetan custom, Tibetan people drink butter tea in separate sips and the host refills the bowl to the brim after each sip. Thus, the guest never drains his bowl because it is constantly topped up. If the visitor does not wish to drink, the best thing for him to do is to leave the tea untouched until the time comes to leave and then drain the bowl. In this way etiquette is observed and the host will not be offended.

Yak Jerky

Tibetans eat a lot of meat, including yak beef, mutton, and pork. Traditionally, the meat is dried and preserved. It is then cut up and tossed into stews or eaten straight off the bone. Don’t be surprised if nomads invite you into their tent, hand you a knife and give you a big bowl of dried yak meat still on the bone!

Dumplings

Dumplings, called momos in Tibet, are every Tibetan’s favorite food. Momos are typically made on special occasions, and family and friends pitch in to make them together. Momos can easily be found at most restaurants, and there are many kinds, including potato momos, mutton momos, veg momos, and others. Tibetans dip the momos into spicy chili paste for added flavor, and wash it down with soup broth.

Milk Tea

Tibetans in central Tibet enjoy drinking sweet milk tea, known as ja ngarmo. The sweet tea is similar to British milk tea, and many visitors to Tibet enjoy the drink. However, Tibetans in the eastern regions of Amdo and Kham prefer plain milk tea or salty milk tea.

Lhasa, Tibetan capital, is the best destination of your China tours. Tibetan cuisine is not renowned for its spices and variety, but it is hearty and healthy and sustains those living on the high plateau. Its exotic flavor is good enough reason for you to try out, which for sure, is going to be a new experience for your taste buds.

Cheap Travel China—Car Rental

On December 2, 2010, in Cultural Experience, Transportation, Travel Info, by Jack Li

China is one of the world top tourist destinations. To have a Travel to Beijing or a Travel to Xi’an is a good way to experience the culture of the country. You want to travel by yourself instead of join a package group. So you can take your time and better enjoy it. If you […]

China is one of the world top tourist destinations. To have a Travel to Beijing or a Travel to Xi’an is a good way to experience the culture of the country.

You want to travel by yourself instead of join a package group. So you can take your time and better enjoy it.

If you are going to stay in China for just a few days, we do not advise you to rent a car there. But if you are planning a relatively long stay, rent a car and drive it would be a much convenient and economical way to enjoy yourself.

About The License

Foreigners who have a driving license issued by their home countries can apply for a temporary driving license and drive in China. The valid period for the temporary driving license is for three months at most and should neither exceed the period marked in the entry and exit certificates, nor be extended. In addition, the temporary driving license should be used together with the driving license issued at his or her home country and foreigners should always take these two licenses with them, in case traffic police ask them to show these licenses at any time.

If you will stay for a relatively long time in China, they can consider obtaining an official driving license in China. You should take their foreign driving licenses and valid ID cards to the automobile management bureau, fill up the automobile driving license application form, take the related physical examination, and attend a traffic regulation test. Then you can get the official driving license issued by the Chinese government.

With the license, you are allowed to drive in China. The key point of our cheap travel is to save the money spent on transportation by driving a rental car. How? Here come the tips!

 

Shop Around

Shop around to find the best rates. Buying online will not only afford you the luxury of seeing what rates look like on any vehicle your want, without the blah blah blah of a salesperson, but also you can get special discounts that many companies offer to people who rent online.

No Unnecessary Room

Why pay for the extra room and the extra gas that bigger cars burn when you do not need the extra room at all? The smaller is the better.

Book In Advance

Once you decide the car just book it because it may not be available the next time you check. What’s as important is that special discount are available If you can book the car a week or more in advance while do it at the last minute and especially during heavy travel times (like holidays) will generally cost you much more, and you will also have less vehicle options as many of the cars will already be booked.

Weekend Discount

Better discount auto rental are often found on weekends when the demand is not as high as other times.

Break the Rental Period

One way car rentals (when the pickup and drop off locations are different) are sometimes more than twice the price of standard rentals, especially when the two locations are far from each other. To break the rental period can save you some money, for example, you need the car for 10 days ,in the same city for 8 and another city for 2, break it into two and have a 8-day same location rental and another 2-day one day rental. You might need to go back to the company but it really worth it.

No Insurance

What are the odds of an accident? Companies make big profits from insurance fees. Some clerks are trained to create as much anxiety as possible for people who decline it. Make up your mind and don’t be talked into it.

Maybe you don’t need insurance at all! It is very likely that your auto insurance policy at home covers rentals as well. Check with your agent. Also check with your credit card company to see if using the card to pay for a rental provides collision coverage.

No Airport Pickups

Picking up a rental car at the airport can be more expensive due to taxes and fees. Try looking at nearby neighborhood locations to save money.

Join the Club

Many larger companies offer club membership in which members pay a yearly fee in exchange for certain perks and privileges. These clubs can save you money with benefits like free rental days and airline miles. We advise you to join it only if you’re a frequent renter.

With good plan and some flexibility, you can always save money on your trip to China by many methods. For a relatively long DIY China travel, rent a car is a better choice.

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