Beautiful China

On March 18, 2013, in China Attractions, Cool Places, Must-sees, Nature Scenery, by Sandy Li

More and more people are attracted to travel in China, a mysterious Asian country with over 5,000 years history. According to statistics, there are 57.72 million inbound visitors who spent at least overnight last year. China is a beautiful country, with plenty of tourist resources. Grap the pretty season and take China flights to explore […]

More and more people are attracted to travel in China, a mysterious Asian country with over 5,000 years history. According to statistics, there are 57.72 million inbound visitors who spent at least overnight last year.

China is a beautiful country, with plenty of tourist resources. Grap the pretty season and take China flights to explore the beauty of  China.

In general, sightseeings in China can be divided into four parts, the northern part of China, south regions of the Yongtze River, the southern part of China, and Tibet and Xinjiang. You will enjoy various China tours when you start your trips in China.

The northern part of China is often described as crude and masculine. Architectures and scenery there are of exclusively features. In Harbin, there is Ice Engraving Festival every year. Visitors would see themselves in a palace made of ice. To people who is fond of Kongfu, Henan Province shall be a great place to go. Shaolin Monastery is ranked the first Buddhist temple in China, with thick Kongfu atmosphere attracting visitors both domestic and exotic. Beijing, the capital of China, also the ancient capital of two dynasties lasting about 600 years (since 1421), reserves lots of historical sites. Standing in front of those ancient parks, temples and architectures, you would be impressed by the wisdom of people in the past.

Since we compare the nothern part of China as a masculine, then the southern regions of the Yangtze River must be a beautiful and soft girl. Suzhou and Hangzhou are said to be the paradise in real life. Plenty of beautiful and touching fairy tales are originated here. You can relax yourself under the oiled paper umbrella, along the cobble-clear river, and smelling the flowers’ fragrance. Architecture in Anhui Province has its own style, in which you may find the harmony between human and the nature.

The scenery in the region of the Three Gorges is still too great to be neglected. The sublime dam itself is a place worth to visit, not to mention those ecological parks there.

 

The third part of Beautiful China is the southern part of China. Warm in all seasons, flowers are seen everywhere. Yunnan is a place said to be the arcadia for lovers. You may wanna stay there for a couple of days with your love, with nothing to disturb you.

Lijiang and Dali are particularly beautiful and tranquil. Each year, painters, photographers, and bands would go there to find inspiration.

 

The fourth part of Beautiful China is Tibet and Xinjiang, regions with thick atmosphere of religion. You may have a glimpse of the glamourous Potala Palace, but do pay attention to the altitude reaction. The Mountain of Flames, ancient city cites, and Heaven Lake of Tianshan Mount are only instances among numerous places we strongly commend you to go. People who have ever been there are all impressed by the gorgeous and splendid scenery, as well as the special local customs. You won’t be disappointed.

 

Beautiful China is always a nice option for tourism and vacation. No matter which part of China you are interested in, there will always be surprises for you during your activities.

East and West, Guilin is the Best

On February 26, 2013, in China Attractions, Must-sees, Nature Scenery, by Sandy Li

Have you ever been to Guilin? If not, please find your China flights to experience its charm. Guilin’s unique topography had left a deep impression on many people who had visited Guilin, so how about you? I am sure that once visiting this charming city, you would find that there is so many surprises waiting for you […]

Have you ever been to Guilin? If not, please find your China flights to experience its charm. Guilin’s unique topography had left a deep impression on many people who had visited Guilin, so how about you? I am sure that once visiting this charming city, you would find that there is so many surprises waiting for you to discover on your Chian tour.

Guilin is regarded as the most picturesque city in China. Two crystal-clear rivers, Lijiang River and Peach Blossom River, meander through the city, which are encircled by hills. The two rivers are likened to be green silk ribbons, while the dramatic hills seem like emerald hair-pins.

So the rich nature resources have long been taken as the inspiration for artists and painters. And innumerous inscriptions and poems eulogized its beauty in the history of China. No wonder that it is widely spreaded that “east and west, Guilin landscape is best”.

Then, what to say in Guilin? Well, the classical attractions include the “Three Hills, Two Caves and One River”, which refers to Diecai Hill, Fubo Hill and Elephant Trunk Hill, Reed Flute Cave and Seven-Star Cave, and the world-renowned Li River. Whether you would like to take a relaxing vacation or plan to have a wonderful sightseeing, you will be exceptionally surprised by what Guilin has to offer.

 

For those who love delicious foods, it is also a paradise! The most popular local snacks include the rice noodles (mifen), nun noodles, chestnut glutinous rice dumplings (banli zong), stewed duck with gingko, lotus-leaf duck and stewed duck with ginger. Especially, Guilin rice noodles have long enjoyed fame. The rice noodles are round, thin and flexible, the soup fresh and fragrant and the meat very tasty.

 

As for its weather, it is really pleasant to go in sping! Guilin sits in a subtropical monsoon zone with a warm and moist climate, which is moderate all year round. The average temperature all year round is 19°C(66F) and the best time to travel here is between April and October.

You could hardly wait to have a visit? Don’t worry about the trouble to get there. Actually, Guilin is a well-developed tourist city with convenient transportation facilities. You can enter the city by air, train, long-distance bus or ship and get around the city by bus, taxi or bicycle.

As a tourism city, Guilin has many hotels, including more than 30 five-star hotels, 100 four-star hotels, and 200 three-star hotels, which can satisfy your varified needs. For those who have a limited budget, hostels are good choices. They are quite economical and convenient, which are especially suitable for backpackers. Hostels provide simple but basic facilities at a budget price. Besides, Holiday Villages & Houses are widely available here. Most of these are well-equipped and located near tourist attractions in Guilin’s surrounding areas. Therefore they are the perfect place for leisure and sightseeing.

Travelers can take advantage of affordable deals by making good plans before you go. You can find comprehensive informations with China Travel Depot. Enjoy it and surely you’ll never regret every single moment.

Free Tour Award of Chinatraveldepot – Beijing Hutongs and 798 Art Zone Tour

On January 23, 2013, in Beijing, China Attractions, China Travel Gossip, Temples, by Sandy Li

This quarter’s Beijing Free Tour contest has just finished. The lucky winner, out of over one thousand candidates, can choose his company, and visit 798 ArtZone, Hutong, and DrumTower, along with the HouhaiLake. All expenses are borne by Chinatraveldepot. By convention, this tour shall berecorded by a professional photographer, appointed by China Travel Depot. We […]

This quarter’s Beijing Free Tour contest has just finished. The lucky winner, out of over one thousand candidates, can choose his company, and visit 798 ArtZone, Hutong, and DrumTower, along with the HouhaiLake. All expenses are borne by Chinatraveldepot. By convention, this tour shall berecorded by a professional photographer, appointed by China Travel Depot. We would like to help them preserve this uncommon experience, and share it with others. On Nov. 31st, the contest was brought to a closure and we had our lucky guy, Fida Rehman. Mr. Rehman and his friend would benefit from this wonderful Beijing tour.

On the morning of January 12th, 2013, Rehman and his friend started the tour by visiting our first stop, 798ArtZone. 798ArtZone, located in the northeast of centralBeijing, is always compared with Greenwich Village and SOHO inNew York. History and reality, industry and the arts perfectly fit here. Also known as 798ArtDistrict, it is a new rising, avant-garde and trendy space that hosts high-level cultural, artistic and commercial activities. Rehman and his friend had a good time appreciating mottled red-brick wall, scattered orderly industrial plants, crisscross pipelines, slogans of different ages on the wall.

At noon they came to a hutong around Houhai. They were highly impressed by the traditional Chinese architecture and the pace of life in hutongs. People here are much more leisure than those onBeijing’s broad modern avenues, and the neighbourhood here is quiet and relaxing. The narrowness of the alleyways and of many courtyard homes discourages heavy traffic but encourages residents to live their lives on the street, fostering a strong sense of community. It is common to see the residents playing cards, Chinese chess, Mahjong, or simply chatting with each other. The hutongs are like village within the megalopolis. As wandering among, they were surprised as though stepped into the past. There they had their lunch, and were not disappointed by the Chinese cuisine.

Visitors who have interest may experience Rickshaw Drive through the zigzag Hutongs near Houhai Lake. Once in ancient China, people took rickshaws like taxis.  Sitting on it you could have a rest, but still having a pleasant view of the beautiful scenery.

Before we called it a day, they also dropped by theDrumTower. It was built in 1420, on a 4-meter high base and is over 46-meter high. Not far from it, there standsBellTower. The twin towers together worked to tell people the time in the past days. Rehman said he was devastated by the size of the drum. No one could imagine how ancient people can make such a huge drum, and installed it. About 600 years passed, the drum is still safe and sound, telling time every single day.

In the end of the day, Rehman and his friend expressed their sincere gratitude to us. They had a wonderful day, getting a better understanding with Beijing local culture. We also hope more and more people can have a chance to join us on your China tours.Beijingwelcomes you!

A Romantic Honeymoon of Swiss Groom and Chinese Bride in Xinjiang and Tibet

On January 9, 2013, in Adventure Trip, Cultural Experience, Historical Relics, Must-sees, Temples, by Sandy Li

On August 15th, 2012, Urumchi (the capital city of Xinjiang Province) witnessed a transnational wedding. The groom, Fares Abdullah comes from Switzerland, and the bride Li Miao comes from China. More and more people would choose to take China flihgts and have a wedding tour, which can be customised by the travel agency. Fares sent mails to […]

On August 15th, 2012, Urumchi (the capital city of Xinjiang Province) witnessed a transnational wedding. The groom, Fares Abdullah comes from Switzerland, and the bride Li Miao comes from China.

More and more people would choose to take China flihgts and have a wedding tour, which can be customised by the travel agency. Fares sent mails to us expressing his wish to spend their honeymoon by a Silk Road tour, or along Kashgar, Turpan, Kanas and finally to Lhasa in Tibet. There, during this China tour, in Urumchi the couple wishes to have a special wedding. 25 guests were invited to join their romantic honeymoon travel. They were his family members or friends, from Switzerland, Germany, Palestine, US and UK.

Though the local government in Tibet strengthened the restriction on inbound tourists, we successfully helped them with all required documents. They had a wonderful time in China.

 On August 5th, all the visitors took their flight to Urumqi on their own, and were picked up at the airport by the guide. After one-day rest in the hotel, we flew to Kashgar on August 6th. All people were impressed by the scenery in Dawakun desert, Kashgar. In the morning of the third day, we took the car for 3.5 hours (200 kilometers) to the Karakuri Lake, which is located 3,600 meters above sea level. Surrounded by snow mountains to the east of the Pamirs, this lake offers local herds with fertile grassland and travelers with extraordinary charming scenery. Visitors could also see the yurts, camels and horses of the Tajik people inhabiting here.

On August 8th, we had a Kashgar city tour. Firstly we visited the famous Id Kah Mosque located in the city center. On August 9th, we went to visit Turpan. Where we had our time in Jiaohe Ruins, Karez Well.

August 15th, 2012 was a wonderful day. The couple had their wedding ceremony. They were blessed by everyone. Many Occidental men found their true love in China, this mysterious Asian country. They choose to hold the wedding in China, and have a better understanding of this region. Their Chinese wives could also be a nice guide to introduce Chinese culture and tradition to them. It is a very romantic journey. For many Chinese girls, planning a honeymoon trip in China is a nice gift their foreign husband can give, showing their love and respect.

The next day after the wedding, all the visitors flew to Xining from Urumqi. They came to the Jokhang Temple, the splendid Potala PalaceTibet Museum, Norbulingka Park, and many interesting places in Tibet.

On August 19th, all people were transferred to Lhasa airport and took the flight to Beijing. By then the happy couple had their unforgettable and romantic honeymoon travel. This is a happy beginning for the life of this lucky couple.

All guests who participate in this wedding trip feel incredible about beautiful scenery and holy religious atmosphere in Tibet. For some of them, this is the first time to go to China. We are also happy to help people all over the world to know better about China. In the end, we give our best wishes to this couple. We wish them good health, and happy forever!

 

Beijing starts a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries

According to Beijing municipal authorities, Beijing will start a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries from January 1, 2013. International travelers enjoy 72 hours transit visa policy based on the requirements of the Ministry of Public Security, in arriving at the Beijing Capital Airport, shall comply with the following conditions: 1) in line […]

According to Beijing municipal authorities, Beijing will start a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries from January 1, 2013.

International travelers enjoy 72 hours transit visa policy based on the requirements of the Ministry of Public Security, in arriving at the Beijing Capital Airport, shall comply with the following conditions:

1) in line with the scope of the citizens of the country, including:

— European Schengen visa agreement countries (24), Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia , Spain, Sweden, Switzerland

Other European countries (7) Russia, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Romania, Ukraine

— American States (6) United States, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile

Oceania countries (2), Australia, New Zealand

Asian countries (6) South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Brunei, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar;

2)  holding valid international travel documents to prove their nationality;

3)  in line with the conditions of entry to the country or region;

4)  held by the exit from the Beijing Capital International Airport way ticket to a third country or region, or prove within 72 hours to determine the date and seat;

5) equipped with the entry and exit of airlines reporting to the border authorities.

Beijing border audited in line with the transit visa-free conditions, will be handled in accordance with the provisions of the transit procedures.

____________________________

For more information on travel to Beijing with visa free, contact us at: info@chinatraveldepot.com, or visit http://www.chinatraveldepot.com/website/beijing-transit-tour/#?utm_source=CTD&utm_medium=home&utm_campaign=72hours

 

In the Presence of a Giant at Leshan

On July 26, 2012, in Historical Relics, Must-sees, Sichuan, by Jack Li

When planning your itinerary for traveling to China, the Sichuan Province holds many cultural, architectural, and historical treasures. One of its most well known is the Leshan Giant Buddha. Within every detail of its form, the Giant Buddha makes a profound impression carved into the side of a cliff, overseeing its three surrounding rivers. When […]

When planning your itinerary for traveling to China, the Sichuan Province holds many cultural, architectural, and historical treasures. One of its most well known is the Leshan Giant Buddha. Within every detail of its form, the Giant Buddha makes a profound impression carved into the side of a cliff, overseeing its three surrounding rivers. When I went to visit, I could not help but draw a comparison between this structure and one that is famous in my home country, Mount Rushmore. The main differences between these sites however, besides location, is that the Leshan Giant Buddha far surpasses Mount Rushmore in age and close-up viewing access to the public. The Buddha reaches an immense height of 233 ft. and is one of the world’s largest stone statues of the beloved deity. Construction of the Leshan Buddha dates back to the Tang Dynasty  in 713 AD and took nearly ninety years to complete. The location of this grand statue was defined by the convergence of the three neighboring rivers, the Min, Dadu and Qingyi.

Throughout China’s history, the strong currents of these rivers took many lives of those who worked in this watery locale. Due to these losses, the idea was formed to create a Buddha near the waters in hopes of taming their ferocity. Remarkably enough, however, a complex drainage system was also constructed to redirect water away from the Buddha to preserve its form. To see the Buddha, visitors board tour boats that deliver you to just the right locations in order to get close as well as far away views. You also have the option of viewing the great Buddha by entering the park and scaling up the cliff side. This is the best way to get very up close photographs of the Buddha’s features, but you have to put in the work of the ascending and descending climbs in order to get to these perfect observation points. The Leshan Giant Buddha gazes out to the horizon which spans over the meeting of three rivers in the Sichuan Province. Leshan is a must-see China tour for all travelers.

Stairs on Stairs on Stairs

On June 25, 2012, in China Attractions, Cool Places, Historical Relics, Must-sees, by Jack Li

Today marks the third week since I got off the string of Beijing flights that I took on my way to China, and I’ve finally seen the Great Wall of China.  Whenever I contacted friends or family back in the US their first question whenever I mentioned that I was in China was always “have you […]

Today marks the third week since I got off the string of Beijing flights that I took on my way to China, and I’ve finally seen the Great Wall of China.  Whenever I contacted friends or family back in the US their first question whenever I mentioned that I was in China was always “have you seen the wall yet?”  No matter who you are, China travel is not complete without a trip to the Great Wall, and believe me, your friends and family will let you know it.

The Great Wall of China on a foggy dayWe went to the Mutianyu section of the wall, famous for the massive toboggan slide that you can ride down the side of it.  Unfortunately when we went it started raining and the slide was closed, so the thrill seekers amongst us were a tad disappointed.  Just seeing the slide from above was insane: it was massive, full of twists and turns, and led from the top of the wall down to ground level.  It looks epic, and I know I’m going to try to make it down again on a clearer day.

We quickly got over the rain, and faced the wall.  A few of us who are fans of barefoot running decided to tackle the wall barefoot rather than getting our shoes wet.  While I wouldn’t recommend this to anyone not experienced with barefoot running/walking, it was a lot of fun.  The stones were all smooth and cool from the rain and I felt connected to
the wall and the history behind it.  We also had great traction on the slippery stones.

As an upside of the rain, the wall was mostly empty when we climbed it.  We ran back and forth in both directions, scrambled up the steps, climbed up on rocks, and took an absurd amount of pictures.  Because of the clouds our pictures didn’t have the immense sweeping views that you can find online, but I like the fog, it adds a mythical feel to the wall.

The wall is incomprehensibly huge, and extremely high up on the mountain.  There are ski lifts that take you up, or you can make the hike up yourself.  Be sure to bring snacks and water, some are available on top of the wall but for a much higher price than on the ground.  The wall is a bit of a hike from Beijing, and if you have a big group like us it makes the most sense to rent a van for the day that will cart you to and from the wall.  There are also Beijing Tours that will take you to and from the wall if you’re in a smaller group, our just want a more guided experience.  Happy Hiking!

Crouching Tiger Hidden Panda

On June 20, 2012, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Entertainment, by Jack Li

As part of my China travel I ventured into the depths of Houhai to catch a Kung Fu show.  A friend of mine who speaks better Chinese than I bought the tickets from an all Chinese website, and we only had a vague idea what was in store for us.  We got a little turned […]

As part of my China travel I ventured into the depths of Houhai to catch a Kung Fu show.  A friend of mine who speaks better Chinese than I bought the tickets from an all Chinese website, and we only had a vague idea what was in store for us.  We got a little turned around getting there and as a result arrived right before the show began.  When we sat down we were trapped in a sea of Panda costumes, and were worried our poor Chinese has accidentally led us to a kids show.  Once they show started, however, we realized it was anything but, and that the show was a great addition to our China tours.

Kung Fu Bandana

Kung Fu Bandanna

The show was based around two pandas traveling around China to learn about all of the different Kung Fu styles.  Each act took place in a different part of China and focused on a different style.  The acts began with the panda’s wandering through the sets acting as the comic relief clowns.  Then a large group scene would begin with many different martial artists practicing the style and the pandas getting caught in the middle of it.  Finally, a master of the style would come out and perform a much more impressive feat.  These ranged from fighting off an entire group, to breaking a stack of bricks, to fighting upside down.  Everyone in the show was in peak physical condition, and the fighting scenes were spectacular.

I came into the whole show with high expectations after having it built up to me over Skype for hours before I went, and I was not disappointed.  I’ve always had a soft spot for Kung Fu movies, but there is nothing like seeing the real thing.  When you’re on stage there’s [almost] no special effects and no safety net.  The performance was raw, entertaining, and extremely impressive.

The entire show was full of laughs, thrills, and excitement.  It was relatively inexpensive, and was a great way to spend a night.  If you’re interested the website is http://kungfushichahai.com/, it’s in Chinese though so have a friend or Google translator ready if like me your Chinese is not always up to par.  See this show or any Kung Fu show as part of your China travels.  It’s a great way to experience the people and culture of China, and see an amazing show to boot.  Ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages, this is not a show you want to miss.

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The Silk Market Strikes Back

On June 18, 2012, in Beijing, Shopping, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

This past Saturday my fellow interns and I gathered together our wallets, poker faces, and headed over to the silk market as a much anticipated part of our China travel, .  We returned with lighter wallets, and lots of swag.  Here are some more tips for buying anything at the Silk Market when you travel to Beijing: Get […]

This past Saturday my fellow interns and I gathered together our wallets, poker faces, and headed over to the silk market as a much anticipated part of our China travel, .  We returned with lighter wallets, and lots of swag.  Here are some more tips for buying anything at the Silk Market when you travel to Beijing:

Get used to saying No

If you aren’t saying no much more than you say yes, then you’re doing it wrong.  Most vendors’ first price will be in the stratosphere (Someone tried to sell me a t-shirt for 500 RMB, see you there) and they will try to get the highest price out of you that you are willing to pay.  Don’t even consider the early prices, give a firm “NO” and tell them much lower price that you would like to say.  Stay firm with your price, and don’t feel the need to raise your number every time they lower theirs.  One of my friends fell into this trap, she spent too much time thinking about offered prices, and she let her price gradually rise.  Give the vendors an inch and they will take a mile, they’re very good and what they do.  When the vendor gets into range of my price, however, I’ll usually try to meet them halfway.  This relentless stubbornness, coupled with a little giving at the end has worked well for me.

Use a strong team

If possible, travel to the markets with someone who is as willing to negotiate as hard as you are.  My friend and I acted as a team for anything item that either of us wanted to purchase.  Since I was not invested in his purchases, and he was not invested in mine, we were always able to save the other from a bad deal and get a better price.  Don’t underestimate the power of teamwork.  That being said, the vendors will try to appeal to everyone in your group, be it children, parents, significant others, or insignificant others to buy their wares.  Be sure that everyone is on the same page before you begin to bargain.

You’ll get better deals late at night

As it gets later and later vendors just want to unload their stuff.  Bargaining takes less time and vendors are more willing to accept your price than they are earlier in the day.  The two caveats to keep in mind are that some of the stalls close before the rest close at 9PM, and you will be one of the few customers still in the market, so everyone’s attention will be directed at you.

Everyone has the same stuff

With the exception of only a few stalls that sell unique handmade goods, most of the vendors are selling basically the same thing.  Don’t get attached to any stall or owner, if the two of you can’t agree on a price walk away.  You might get a better price and if not who cares, you can try your hand at bargaining for the same thing at the next stall.  Also – If any of the vendors are rude to you (one of them said my friend was ugly and no one would remember him) then don’t buy anything from them, move on to the next one.  There are too many nice people there trying to make a living to worry yourself with the bad eggs.

 

The Silk Market is a great stop to make on your Beijing Tours.  Good luck, happy bargaining.

Discovering China by Railway

On May 25, 2012, in Tips & Ideas, Transportation, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Travelling by train in China is often a convenient and fast way to get around on your China Tours and usually train tickets are a lot cheaper than airfare. Not all routes are super quick but if you travel overnight and you can get some rest on the way you don’t really lose time and […]

Travelling by train in China is often a convenient and fast way to get around on your China Tours and usually train tickets are a lot cheaper than airfare. Not all routes are super quick but if you travel overnight and you can get some rest on the way you don’t really lose time and you can even safe one night’s accommodation. Other positive aspect about travelling by train is that you get to see more of the countryside and personally I think it’s an interesting part of any china travel experience.

One thing about train tickets is that you can’t buy them more than ten days in advance, so depending on the length of your stay you might not be able to buy the return ticket before your departure. For popular routes and especially on national holiday weekends tickets sell out quickly, so make sure to get your tickets early enough. You can buy them either directly at the train station or at special train ticket offices where you will be charged an extra 5 RMB service fee per ticket. If you don’t speak any Chinese and want to make sure to get the right ticket you should probably book it thorough a travel agency. They will also charge you a service fee but it makes things easier and safer for yourself. To buy tickets you will have to present the passports of all travelers.

The bigger cities usually have several main railway stations, so make sure you know which one to go to. Some are very modern and in many ways more like an airport than a train station and very big but well-organized. The train rides are announced on the boards and by speaker (most of the time in Chinese) and you have designated waiting areas for your train ride just like on airports. At the railway station and on the train itself you can always get boiling hot water, so you can enjoy a tea at any time of your trip and instant food where you just need to add hot water and stir is very popular. You can get food at the railway stations and usually also on the trains, most have a dining car, but it’s still best to bring your own food, just in case. During the ride you should always keep your ticket with you because you’ll have to present it more than once during your journey, often again when you get out of the train station once you’ve arrived. Before entering the train you will also have to present your passport which you have used to book the ticket.

There are different train ticket categories: hard seats (might sound uncomfortable although they are just like normal train or plane seats), soft seats (first class seats, softer, bigger and with more leg room) and then there are two different ‘bed’ categories, called hard sleeper and soft sleeper. Hard sleeper compartments are open and have six bunks; sheets and pillows are provided. It can be noisy at times but still this way of travelling is very cost effective. The soft sleeper category is more comfortable with only four bunks in separate compartments with a door towards the aisle. Depending on your budget and your need for comfort you can choose which train category is best or if you still prefer the China Flights.

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