Beautiful China

On March 18, 2013, in China Attractions, Cool Places, Must-sees, Nature Scenery, by Sandy Li

More and more people are attracted to travel in China, a mysterious Asian country with over 5,000 years history. According to statistics, there are 57.72 million inbound visitors who spent at least overnight last year. China is a beautiful country, with plenty of tourist resources. Grap the pretty season and take China flights to explore […]

More and more people are attracted to travel in China, a mysterious Asian country with over 5,000 years history. According to statistics, there are 57.72 million inbound visitors who spent at least overnight last year.

China is a beautiful country, with plenty of tourist resources. Grap the pretty season and take China flights to explore the beauty of  China.

In general, sightseeings in China can be divided into four parts, the northern part of China, south regions of the Yongtze River, the southern part of China, and Tibet and Xinjiang. You will enjoy various China tours when you start your trips in China.

The northern part of China is often described as crude and masculine. Architectures and scenery there are of exclusively features. In Harbin, there is Ice Engraving Festival every year. Visitors would see themselves in a palace made of ice. To people who is fond of Kongfu, Henan Province shall be a great place to go. Shaolin Monastery is ranked the first Buddhist temple in China, with thick Kongfu atmosphere attracting visitors both domestic and exotic. Beijing, the capital of China, also the ancient capital of two dynasties lasting about 600 years (since 1421), reserves lots of historical sites. Standing in front of those ancient parks, temples and architectures, you would be impressed by the wisdom of people in the past.

Since we compare the nothern part of China as a masculine, then the southern regions of the Yangtze River must be a beautiful and soft girl. Suzhou and Hangzhou are said to be the paradise in real life. Plenty of beautiful and touching fairy tales are originated here. You can relax yourself under the oiled paper umbrella, along the cobble-clear river, and smelling the flowers’ fragrance. Architecture in Anhui Province has its own style, in which you may find the harmony between human and the nature.

The scenery in the region of the Three Gorges is still too great to be neglected. The sublime dam itself is a place worth to visit, not to mention those ecological parks there.

 

The third part of Beautiful China is the southern part of China. Warm in all seasons, flowers are seen everywhere. Yunnan is a place said to be the arcadia for lovers. You may wanna stay there for a couple of days with your love, with nothing to disturb you.

Lijiang and Dali are particularly beautiful and tranquil. Each year, painters, photographers, and bands would go there to find inspiration.

 

The fourth part of Beautiful China is Tibet and Xinjiang, regions with thick atmosphere of religion. You may have a glimpse of the glamourous Potala Palace, but do pay attention to the altitude reaction. The Mountain of Flames, ancient city cites, and Heaven Lake of Tianshan Mount are only instances among numerous places we strongly commend you to go. People who have ever been there are all impressed by the gorgeous and splendid scenery, as well as the special local customs. You won’t be disappointed.

 

Beautiful China is always a nice option for tourism and vacation. No matter which part of China you are interested in, there will always be surprises for you during your activities.

A Romantic Honeymoon of Swiss Groom and Chinese Bride in Xinjiang and Tibet

On January 9, 2013, in Adventure Trip, Cultural Experience, Historical Relics, Must-sees, Temples, by Sandy Li

On August 15th, 2012, Urumchi (the capital city of Xinjiang Province) witnessed a transnational wedding. The groom, Fares Abdullah comes from Switzerland, and the bride Li Miao comes from China. More and more people would choose to take China flihgts and have a wedding tour, which can be customised by the travel agency. Fares sent mails to […]

On August 15th, 2012, Urumchi (the capital city of Xinjiang Province) witnessed a transnational wedding. The groom, Fares Abdullah comes from Switzerland, and the bride Li Miao comes from China.

More and more people would choose to take China flihgts and have a wedding tour, which can be customised by the travel agency. Fares sent mails to us expressing his wish to spend their honeymoon by a Silk Road tour, or along Kashgar, Turpan, Kanas and finally to Lhasa in Tibet. There, during this China tour, in Urumchi the couple wishes to have a special wedding. 25 guests were invited to join their romantic honeymoon travel. They were his family members or friends, from Switzerland, Germany, Palestine, US and UK.

Though the local government in Tibet strengthened the restriction on inbound tourists, we successfully helped them with all required documents. They had a wonderful time in China.

 On August 5th, all the visitors took their flight to Urumqi on their own, and were picked up at the airport by the guide. After one-day rest in the hotel, we flew to Kashgar on August 6th. All people were impressed by the scenery in Dawakun desert, Kashgar. In the morning of the third day, we took the car for 3.5 hours (200 kilometers) to the Karakuri Lake, which is located 3,600 meters above sea level. Surrounded by snow mountains to the east of the Pamirs, this lake offers local herds with fertile grassland and travelers with extraordinary charming scenery. Visitors could also see the yurts, camels and horses of the Tajik people inhabiting here.

On August 8th, we had a Kashgar city tour. Firstly we visited the famous Id Kah Mosque located in the city center. On August 9th, we went to visit Turpan. Where we had our time in Jiaohe Ruins, Karez Well.

August 15th, 2012 was a wonderful day. The couple had their wedding ceremony. They were blessed by everyone. Many Occidental men found their true love in China, this mysterious Asian country. They choose to hold the wedding in China, and have a better understanding of this region. Their Chinese wives could also be a nice guide to introduce Chinese culture and tradition to them. It is a very romantic journey. For many Chinese girls, planning a honeymoon trip in China is a nice gift their foreign husband can give, showing their love and respect.

The next day after the wedding, all the visitors flew to Xining from Urumqi. They came to the Jokhang Temple, the splendid Potala PalaceTibet Museum, Norbulingka Park, and many interesting places in Tibet.

On August 19th, all people were transferred to Lhasa airport and took the flight to Beijing. By then the happy couple had their unforgettable and romantic honeymoon travel. This is a happy beginning for the life of this lucky couple.

All guests who participate in this wedding trip feel incredible about beautiful scenery and holy religious atmosphere in Tibet. For some of them, this is the first time to go to China. We are also happy to help people all over the world to know better about China. In the end, we give our best wishes to this couple. We wish them good health, and happy forever!

 

Planning your trip to China

This article especially targets people who has never been to China. As a European girl, I realized that travelling to China needs specific preparation and most of all… time. For some of you all the tips I will give would seem quite logical to you, however I know that before leaving we always have the […]

This article especially targets people who has never been to China. As a European girl, I realized that travelling to China needs specific preparation and most of all… time. For some of you all the tips I will give would seem quite logical to you, however I know that before leaving we always have the impression that we forgot something but we don’t know what. This is a list on which you can check on before taking your China flight.

Most important things (in the order)

1. Passport
Of course without a passport you can’t travel anywhere. Make sure it will be still valid 6 months after the return date and check if there are 2 blank pages left. If it isn’t the case you must anticipate and have a new passport, in some country it can take until 2 months to do that.

2. Flights
Book a flight to China. The cheapest flights are online, try to book them several months before your departure. It will cost you between 500 and 1,000$ for an economic round-trip flight depending on the season and the duration. You will have great chances to travel with Air China, China Eastern Airlines or China Southern Airlines. All the meals and drinks are free (no additional fee) and of course you will enjoy Chinese food. Chinese and other international movies will be displayed with English and Chinese subtitles.

3. Visa


You should go to the nearest Chinese Embassy or the Chinese Consulate to have a visa. Check on their website or call them first to know all the documents they need in addition of the application form so you won’t waste your time by getting there just for that information. In general you will be given your visa within 5 work days, or if you pay to speed it up within 48 hours, yet as we are insightful people the better would applying at least 2 weeks before the departure just in case, and not 2 days before.

Other tips

Make sure that your credit card has the logo “Visa”, so you can withdraw your money on some random ATM machines once arrived and not take all the money with you. And don’t be surprised most of the shops in China don’t have card machines, so check with your bank before leaving if you have a withdrawal limit per week or months since you’ll have to pay almost everything with cash.

Bring your own cellphone or an old one, it will always be useful to be contacted and to contact other people since your sim card won’t probably work in China. A lot of people think that buying a mobile phone is quite cheap here, but I think that it’s even more expensive that in your country, it is in my case. More over the cheapest phones, the one you had like 10 years ago, will cost you 200yuan if you really need one. Besides, the sim card and calls are very cheap; with only 30RMB you can text and call for 2 weeks if you don’t have any particular big needs. And be careful once your credit is over, you can’t receive any call, you have to recharge to be contacted.

My personal advice if you can’t speak Chinese or only few words: since Chinese people are not very good in English and only few of them can speak a foreign language, take pictures of toilets, food, water, bus, bed, fork, chopsticks… before leaving. You won’t waste time to look for the word in a dictionary and pronounce it in a weird accent, pictures is a language that anyone can understand!

These were the basic things not to forget before doing China tours. I hope you to enjoy your trip the best way as possible and send us a picture of your best memories in our Facebook to share your experience!

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Hidden

On June 27, 2012, in Beijing, Cool Places, Nightlife, by Jack Li

Those of you who do not know where the Hidden Lounge is and how to find it are not alone.  As its name implies, the Hidden Lounge is sneakily tucked away inside the CBD International Apartment complex in the Shuangjing District.  Open the door under a dimly lit sign, and walk down the stairs into […]

Those of you who do not know where the Hidden Lounge is and how to find it are not alone.  As its name implies, the Hidden Lounge is sneakily tucked away inside the CBD International Apartment complex in the Shuangjing District.  Open the door under a dimly lit sign, and walk down the stairs into another world.  It’s a mellow/chic bar and lounge that offers a delicious selection of cocktails and hookah.  It’s been weeks since I got off my China flights, and I’ve only just found it myself.  The bar is littered with cushions, couches, and curtains that make you feel right at home.  The atmosphere is relaxed, and the background music is an eclectic mix of dance music, jazz, and Latin music that speaks to my soul.  In addition, it’s the only place I’ve found in China that serves salty popcorn that isn’t coated inside and out with sugar.  It’s one of the best lounges to stop by in when you travel to Beijing.

Hidden is a great place to unwind after a long day.  After a nine hour work day and two hours of Chinese Lessons a little nagging voice tells me to pass out.  The angel on my shoulder tells me I need to contact friends and family back home, and work on my own projects, and his counterpart tells me I should go out with friends and blow off some steam.  Hidden lets me do all three.  The wifi allows me to be semi-productive (I did some work on a startup I help run, while some of my friends worked on their Chinese homework), the relaxing atmosphere lets me relax with my friends, and the absurdly comfortable seating lets me take a load off.  Hidden is the kind of bar where you can have your cake and eat it too.

A huge part of the environment is the owner, originally hailing from Orlando Florida.  He’s been in Beijing for the past eight years, has lots of great stories and advice for travelers.  With his help I finally know where to find Mexican food in Beijing, something I’ve craved since I first arrived.  Just remember to leave him a tip, a habit that has been beaten out of me here in China.  No matter how great it is to travel, it’s always nice to have a little bit of home, and I promise you that he won’t find it rude.  When you travel to Beijing, make a stop at Hidden.

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Contents May be Hot

On June 14, 2012, in Restaurants & Food, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Like many a weary traveler I was exhausted after the final leg of all of my China flights.  Once I landed I had to travel to Beijing, which was a traffic laden journey.  When I finally arrived in my apartment after a full day of traveling, I desperately wanted some water.  I could neither speak […]

Like many a weary traveler I was exhausted after the final leg of all of my China flights.  Once I landed I had to travel to Beijing, which was a traffic laden journey.  When I finally arrived in my apartment after a full day of traveling, I desperately wanted some water.  I could neither speak nor read any Chinese at the time, but the water filter had two levers.  I tried the first, and it was hot water.  My tragically Western sensibilities led me to assume that the other lever was cold, and boy was I wrong.  The other level was actually ungodly hot, and I still have the burn on my hand to prove it.  Over the course of my time here I’ve realized that there is almost no cold non-bottled water in Beijing.

Water options in the office

You can have water at any temperature as long as it's hot

This may seem trivial, but think about how much we drink cold water in the West, be it at restaurants, from water fountains, or directly from the faucet.  After a bit of research and asking around, I’ve come up with what I believe to be the main reasons for the plethora of hot water here in China:

Health/Digestion Concerns:

Hot water is generally accepted as being good for you, helping with digestion, helping to break down oil in your system, and being better for you than cold water since hot water is closer to your body’s temperature.  While a cursory Google search disproved most of these statements, there is nothing wrong with hot water either, so who cares.

Water Quality:

In China the tap water is not drinkable, and some theorize that the taste for hot water was developed in response to the need to boil water before drinking it.  This may or may not be true, but the story has a nice ring to it.

Caution: Contents May Be Hot (Coffee Cup #20), 2003 Fred Lynch

Caution: Contents May Be Hot (Coffee Cup #20), 2003 Fred Lynch

Tea/Noodles:

Since hot water is readily available, it is very easy to make tea or instant noodles wherever you are.  Instant noodles are much more than a dorm room staple here, and can be found at every convenience store in China.  Back in the US it was always an ordeal to heat water for tea, whereas here I can make it on the fly.

Be careful what you drink in your China travel, because if like me you are used to cold water you will be greeted with a big surprise.  Take it in stride, get used to the smaller portions and drinking your hot water slowly.  In less than a week I’ve been cured of my tendencies to down massive quantities of water due to necessity, and have grown to accept hot water instead of cold.  Give it a try, embrace the conveniences it brings, and ignore the rest.  Live how they do on the other side of the world, and you’ll end up with a better understanding of yourself.

A Simple Guide to Airport Transportation

On September 6, 2011, in Beijing, Getting Around, Transportation, Travel Info, by Jack Li

You may be wondering about the possible transport options from Beijing Capital International Airport to your Beijing hotel accommodation. Few airlines arrive at Terminal 1 which caters to mostly domestic flights, so you will most likely arrive at 2 or 3. Terminal 2 is the base for major airlines such as KLM, Delta and China […]

You may be wondering about the possible transport options from Beijing Capital International Airport to your Beijing hotel accommodation. Few airlines arrive at Terminal 1 which caters to mostly domestic flights, so you will most likely arrive at 2 or 3. Terminal 2 is the base for major airlines such as KLM, Delta and China Eastern Airlines, and Terminal 3 is the home of British Airways, Emirates, Air China and Cathay Pacific.

 

There is a free shuttle bus service which connects all the terminals. From 6am until 11pm buses depart every 10 minutes, and outside of this time there is usually a bus once every half hour. The airport is 27km from the town centre and journey times into town will vary depending on your arrival time, this can be up to one hour and may be much less if you do not face any of the notorious Beijing traffic!

 

Possible Transport Options:

  • Airport Shuttle
  • Airport Express (Subway)
  • Taxi

 

Airport Shuttle

The downtown shuttle to the center of Beijing is 16 RMB per person, per ride. There are also shuttles available that head further out, to the border cities such as Tanggu and Tianjin. Tickets are available within the terminal. For Terminal 1 you will find a ticket office at Gate 7, Terminal 2 at gates 9, 10 and 11, and at Terminal 3 next to gates 5, 7 and 11. All these ticket offices are on the first floor, Terminal 3 also has offices on the second floor.

 

There are 9 shuttle lines heading to different sections of the city:

  • Line 1: Airport to Fangzhuang (7am – 1am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 2: Airport to Xidan (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 3: Airport to Beijing Railway Station (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 4: Airport to Gongzhufen (6.50am – 12am) Return Journey (4.50am – 22pm)
  • Line 5: Airport to Zhongguancun (6.50am – 12am) Return Journey (5.30am til 9pm)
  • Line 6: Airport to Wangjing (7am – 22.30pm) Return Journey (5.30am – 8.30pm)
  • Line 7: Airport to Beijing West Railway Station (7.20am – 12am) Return (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 8: Airport to Shangdi (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.30am – 6.30pm)

Follow signs at the airport to find your shuttle, buses usually leave when they are full.

 

Airport Express (Subway)

The airport express (subway line) has four stops on the route:

  • Dongzhimen, Sanyuanqiao, Terminal 3, and Terminal 2.

The journey costs 25 RMB for a one way trip and takes approximately 30 minutes. Carriages leave every 15 minutes and the service operates from 6.35am – 23.10pm from Terminal 2, and 6.20am – 22.50pm from Terminal 3.

Taxi

You can easily catch a taxi to and from the airport, and this is the best option if there are a few of you and you have lots of luggage – but it will be the most expensive. Taxi ranks are located outside the airport, Terminal 1 has stops outside gates 3 to 5, Terminal 2 outside gates 3 to 7, and Terminal 3 has signs within the building directing you to the taxi stand. The minimum charge is 10 RMB for the first 3km, after this each further km will cost 2 RMB.

 

Taxi Tips

  • Insist that the driver uses the meter, ‘Qǐng Dǎbiǎo’ means put the meter on please.
  • Have your destination written in chinese characters as many drivers do not speak English.
  • Be aware of toll charges which you cover in addition to the fare.
  • Be sure to get a licensed taxi with official certification.
  • Note down the taxi number if you have any problems.

 

In addition many of the higher end hotels provide complimentary shuttles for guests so this may also be worth looking into when you travel to Beijing.

 

The Silk Market

On August 29, 2011, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Shopping, Tours, by Jack Li

China is not only renowned for its ancient history and rich cultural heritage but also its extraordinary capacity for manufacturing. Most of the world’s electrical and clothing items are produced in China. Travel to Beijing and there are endless places where you can indulge yourself into buying what ever takes your fancy. The Silk Market […]

China is not only renowned for its ancient history and rich cultural heritage but also its extraordinary capacity for manufacturing. Most of the world’s electrical and clothing items are produced in China. Travel to Beijing and there are endless places where you can indulge yourself into buying what ever takes your fancy.

The Silk Market attracts approximately 50,000 visitors daily and 60,000 on weekends as of 2006. This 35,000-square-meter complex houses 1,700 retail vendor and over 3,000 salespeople spread over seven floors with three levels of basements. Many of the stalls have, over the years, gained local and international reputation for selling counterfeit luxury designer brands at relatively low prices. Some have carried on this trademark despite growing pressures from the management, the Chinese government and famous brand-name companies.

Opened on March 19th 2005, and replacing the old alley-based Xiushui Market, the current Silk Street establishment has diversified their business scope. In addition to selling fashion apparels and accessories such as hats, handbags, shoes, belts, sportswear and silk fabrics like their predecessor, the new Silk Street has introduced traditional Chinese handicrafts, antiques, calligraphy, carpets, table cloths, bed coverings, paintings, hand-knit dresses, toys, electronic gadgets, trinkets, and fine jewelry. Reputable establishments such as the Tongrentang Pharmacy, Quanjude Peking Roast Duck restaurant, and multi-national coffee and restaurant chains such as Lavazza, SPR Coffee, Caffe L’affare, Subway and TCBY have also joined Silk Street’s bid to become the “ultimate one-stop tourist destination” in Beijing. Invested and constructed by Beijing Xinyashenhong Real Estate Development Co., Ltd. and managed by Beijing Silk Street Garment Market Co., Ltd., Silk Street is built along Line 1, Beijing Subway next to Guomao (China World Trade Centre) with a direct basement link to Yonganli subway station (Exit A). This makes it easy to access for any tourists wishing to get their hands on some bargains.

This famous market attracts many people. This provides the salespeople in the silk market to set their own prices and ask for as much as they think they could extract out of one particular individual. However, do no be fooled as this price is normally 4 or 5 fold the amount that you should actually pay. Haggling is a sport when you enter this building. You should always remember that it is a marathon and not a sprint. Have your maximum price (as low as possible) for the item and be stern. If they do not accept, simply walk away. More often then not they will accept the price when you walk away making you the winner of the haggling war.

So Book your Beijing Tours and Beijing Hotels now and practise your haggling skills at the highest stage.

Pingyao County

On August 26, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, by Jack Li

When travelling to large countries it is always difficult to decide what to see. The large cities always offer many attractions and ways to occupy your time. However smaller towns and cities should not be neglected and if possible should most definitely be visited. Steeped in rich cultural history they offer a truer representation of […]

When travelling to large countries it is always difficult to decide what to see. The large cities always offer many attractions and ways to occupy your time. However smaller towns and cities should not be neglected and if possible should most definitely be visited. Steeped in rich cultural history they offer a truer representation of the way China used to be opposed to what it is trying to rejuvenate itself into. China Tours operates trips to see these cultural hot spots so book your China Flights now!

Pingyao is a Chinese city and county in central Shanxi province. It is located about 715 km away from Beijing and 80 km from the provincial capital, Taiyuan. During the Qing Dynasty, Pingyao was the financial center of China. It is now renowned for its well-preserved ancient city wall, and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Pingyao still retains its city layout from the Ming and Qing dynasties, conforming to the traditional bagua pattern. More than 300 sites in or near the city have ancient ruins. All of the streets, storefronts and houses to this day retain their charm and character. The intricate detailed architecture has been preserved and gives the place an added magnificence.

In the spring and autumn seasons, the county belonged to the kingdom of Jin. It was part of the kingdom of Zhao in the Warring States Period. In the Qin Dynasty, it was known as Pingtao. During the Han Dynasty, it was known as Zhongdu County. In 1986, the People’s Republic of China designated Pingyao as one of the Chinese Historic and Cultural Cities. Further to this it became a World Heritage Site in 1997.

The city walls of Pingyao were constructed in the 3rd year of the Hongwu Emperor’s reign (1370). The walls have six barbican gates. The north and south sides have one gate each. The walls measure about 12 meters high, with a perimeter of 6,000 meters. A 4-meter wide, 4-meter deep moat can be found just outside the walls. Aside from the four structured towers at the four corners, there are also 72 watchtowers and more than 3,000 battlements. In 2004, parts of the southern walls collapsed but were reconstructed. However, the rest of the city walls are still largely intact and are considered among the best-preserved ancient city walls on this scale. This makes the city walls the centerpiece of the Heritage Site.

Increases in tourism have put pressure on the ancient walled city of Pingyao. During the tourist high season, the amount of visitors to the city can reach up to 3 times its maximum capacity per day; however, the small town does adequately cope with this demand and is well worth visiting for an excellent cultural experience (China Hotels).

 

Chinese Actors

On August 26, 2011, in Beijing, Transportation, by Jack Li

Despite not having done your China Travel, you should obviously know the following characters, you should get your China Flights and come to see real Chinese movies and actors! Jackie Chan Jackie Chan, (born Chan Kong-sang, 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer, filmmaker, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer […]

Despite not having done your China Travel, you should obviously know the following characters, you should get your China Flights and come to see real Chinese
movies and actors!

Jackie Chan

Jackie Chan, (born Chan Kong-sang, 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer, filmmaker, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer and stunt performer.

In his movies, he is known for his acrobatic fighting style, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts. Jackie Chan has been acting since the 1960s and has appeared in over 100 films. Chan has received stars on the Hong Kong Avenue of Stars and the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

As a cultural icon, Chan has been referenced in various pop songs, cartoons, and video games. An operatically trained vocalist, Chan is also a Cantopop and Mandopop star, having released a number of albums and sung many of the theme songs for the films in which he has starred.

Bruce Lee

Bruce Lee (born Lee Jun-fan; 27 November 1940 – 20 July 1973) was a Chinese American, Hong Kong actor, martial arts instructor, philosopher, film director, film producer, screenwriter, and founder of the Jeet Kune Do martial arts movement. He is widely considered by many commentators, critics, media and other martial artists to be the most influential martial artist, and a cultural icon.

Lee was born in San Francisco to parents of Hong Kong heritage but was raised in Hong Kong until his late teens. Lee emigrated to the United States at the age of 18 to claim his U.S. citizenship and receive his higher education. It was during this time that he began teaching martial arts, which soon led to film and television roles.

His Hong Kong and Hollywood-produced films elevated the traditional Hong Kong martial arts film to a new level of popularity and acclaim, and sparked a major surge of interest in Chinese martial arts in the West in the 1970s. The direction and tone of his films changed and influenced martial arts and martial arts films in Hong Kong and the rest of the world, as well.

Lee became an iconic figure known throughout the world, particularly among the Chinese, as he portrayed Chinese nationalism in his films. He initially trained in Wing Chun, but he later rejected well-defined martial art styles, favoring instead to utilize useful techniques from various sources in the spirit of his personal martial arts philosophy, which he dubbed Jeet Kune Do (The Way of the Intercepting Fist).
Jet Li

Li Lianjie (born April 26, 1963), better known by his stage name Jet Li, is a Chinese martial artist, actor, film producer, wushu champion, and international film star who was born in Beijing, and has taken up Singaporean citizenship in 2009.

After three years of intensive training with Wu Bin, Li won his first national championship for the Beijing Wushu Team. After retiring from wushu at age 17, he went on to win great acclaim in China as an actor making his debut with the film Shaolin Temple (1982). He went on to star in many critically acclaimed martial arts epic films, most notably the Once Upon A Time In China series, in which he portrayed folk heroeWong Fei-hung.

Li’s first role in a Hollywood film was as a villain in Lethal Weapon 4 (1998), but his first Hollywood film leading role was in Romeo Must Die (2000). He has gone on to star in many Hollywood action films, most recently co-starring in The Expendables (2010) with Sylvester Stallone, in The Forbidden Kingdom (2008) with Jackie Chan, and as the title character villain in The Mummy: Tomb Of The Dragon Emperor (2008) opposite Brendan Fraser. He also appeared in the Hong Kong film Ocean Heaven (2010), directed and written by Xue Xiaolu.

Travel to Beijing, go to a Chinese cinema and watch some of this actors fighting, you will be impressed!

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Chinese Architecture

On August 25, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Cool Places, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, Tours, by Jack Li

It is not only what you do in China that leaves an impression what you see also leaves a lasting memory. China has many construction marvels that stun and wow you into appreciation. Across China there are many different styles of architecture. The new and emerging style is very western and futuristic in the aid […]

It is not only what you do in China that leaves an impression what you see also leaves a lasting memory. China has many construction marvels that stun and wow you into appreciation. Across China there are many different styles of architecture. The new and emerging style is very western and futuristic in the aid of rejuvenating the country into the 21st Century. However, the real beauty lies beneath the fancy skyscrapers and glass buildings within the traditional buildings in and amongst the busy cities. Embark on a China Tour and explore what the country has to offer whilst staying at one of China Hotels.

 

Chinese architecture refers to a style of architecture that has taken shape in East Asia over many centuries. The structural principles of Chinese architecture have remained largely unchanged, the main changes being only the decorative details. Since the Tang Dynasty, Chinese architecture has had a major influence on the architectural styles of Korea, Vietnam, and Japan. In recent times many western Chinese architects have tried to merge this traditional style with the newly developing modern architecture however, the success of these buildings has not sparked any triumph within the local people.

 

Since the early 20th Century the modern architecture has been setting new precedence within the industry as the demands for building use are exceeding those for which Chinese architecture can cater for. The need for greater floor area and more volume triggers the need for new building techniques and the introduction of new materials. The traditional way of building in China used to conjure up buildings that were no more than three or four stories high, inadequate for the desires nowadays.

 

In the past timber was used to create buildings and intricate designs. However due to the corrosive nature of the material the life span of these buildings was cut short and the service required from them was still needed. From the Tang Dynasty brick and stone became the most prominent material used in Chinese construction.

Traditional Chinese architecture was originally divided into three main categories that distinguished areas and provided a genetic make up of the urban environment in China. The first category was that of the Commoner. These were mainly living quarters and were designed around a centralized living area, which in turn ended up producing ‘u’ shaped buildings. The second category was called Imperial. This style of building was only used for the Emperors of China. A key feature of these buildings is the use of yellow roof tiles. Yellow was the imperial color. The final category was reserved for all Religious buildings. These mainly followed suit of the imperial building design.

These buildings now all bear important cultural heritage within China, there presence is most definitely felt amongst the newer emerging buildings especially in the cities. All of them posses a charm and extensive character that just cannot be created with sharp lines and glass. They are irreplaceable, therefore making them a must see attraction. Fly over via Air China and witness these spectacles for yourself.

 

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