Beijing starts a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries

According to Beijing municipal authorities, Beijing will start a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries from January 1, 2013. International travelers enjoy 72 hours transit visa policy based on the requirements of the Ministry of Public Security, in arriving at the Beijing Capital Airport, shall comply with the following conditions: 1) in line […]

According to Beijing municipal authorities, Beijing will start a 72-hour visa-free stay policy for citizens of 45 countries from January 1, 2013.

International travelers enjoy 72 hours transit visa policy based on the requirements of the Ministry of Public Security, in arriving at the Beijing Capital Airport, shall comply with the following conditions:

1) in line with the scope of the citizens of the country, including:

— European Schengen visa agreement countries (24), Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia , Spain, Sweden, Switzerland

Other European countries (7) Russia, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Romania, Ukraine

— American States (6) United States, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile

Oceania countries (2), Australia, New Zealand

Asian countries (6) South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Brunei, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar;

2)  holding valid international travel documents to prove their nationality;

3)  in line with the conditions of entry to the country or region;

4)  held by the exit from the Beijing Capital International Airport way ticket to a third country or region, or prove within 72 hours to determine the date and seat;

5) equipped with the entry and exit of airlines reporting to the border authorities.

Beijing border audited in line with the transit visa-free conditions, will be handled in accordance with the provisions of the transit procedures.

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For more information on travel to Beijing with visa free, contact us at: info@chinatraveldepot.com, or visit http://www.chinatraveldepot.com/website/beijing-transit-tour/#?utm_source=CTD&utm_medium=home&utm_campaign=72hours

 

Houhai Lake, the Perfect Beijing Afternoon

On July 23, 2012, in Beijing, Lakes, Parks & Gardens, by Jack Li

When you travel to Beijing, dedicate a day to visiting Houhai Lake and its surroundings hutongs. One of the most enjoyable experiences of my trip here so far was over the weekend, strolling along lakeside watching the boaters go by. The Houhai Lake area, located in Beihai park, may just well be the coolest neighborhood […]

When you travel to Beijing, dedicate a day to visiting Houhai Lake and its surroundings hutongs. One of the most enjoyable experiences of my trip here so far was over the weekend, strolling along lakeside watching the boaters go by. The Houhai Lake area, located in Beihai park, may just well be the coolest neighborhood in town. This is a great place to take a guided Beijing tour; then even better to go back and explore on your own. It has something special for everyone no matter how you enjoy spending the afternoon.

Here’s my recommended itinerary: Start at the opening entrance to Yandai Xiejie and make your way through the treasure trove that is this Hutong marketplace. Walking down this street you may get a feeling such as, “This is exactly what I was looking for in China,” I know I did. Although there are some stores with the average array of souvenirs, there are much more boutiques of unique trinkets, testable teas, handmade crafts and silks, Chinese art, and my personal favorite, plenty of Mao-morabilia. At the end of the street take a left at the Churro stand and make your way towards the lake area. Your first view will be of a quaint bridge with overhanging tree branches, the unspoiled setting for your day. After all that shopping you may need an energy boost, so stop by a number of the lakeside cafes, where you can snuggle up on a plush couch and people watch to your heart’s content. Many venues have live music performers, the perfect finishing touch to any ambiance.

Next, make your way towards the boat rental stand. The views from on land are fantastic, but the experience of Houhai is not complete without getting out on the water. Make sure you steer clear of any exploratory lake swimmers though! Houhai is overflowing with a family oriented atmosphere, night and day. However, as the night comes in Houhai turns into a buzzing, lively nightlife spot. After your boat ride, it’s time for dinner. Take your party to the rooftop or grab a candlelit meal right on the water. This area is abundant with impressive eateries prepared to offer you a great selection of entrees to aperitifs. For those then looking for a good night out, many of the bars offer great deals on drinks as well as live music. The nightlife venues are plentiful and varied, from the relaxing shisha lounges, to those energetically equipped with DJs and dance floors. Don’t forget your camera, because of all that Houhai has to offer, the most important is some of China travel’s greatest views.

Cuandixia Village, A Ming Dynasty Treasure

If you are searching for a Beijing tour that provides an exclusive look into ancient Chinese living, then a trip to Cuandixia is just what you need. This is one of the treasured places in China travel where you can feel as if you have truly gone back in time. Only a short ride away […]

If you are searching for a Beijing tour that provides an exclusive look into ancient Chinese living, then a trip to Cuandixia is just what you need. This is one of the treasured places in China travel where you can feel as if you have truly gone back in time. Only a short ride away from the downtown Beijing area, there is an ancient village named Cuandixia that appears visually untouched since its formation 600 years ago during the Ming Dynasty. Nestled amongst a jagged mountain range, Cuandixia is a beautiful respite from the bustling, crowded scenes of Beijing city. The scenery of Cuandixia is filled with hilly landscapes, plush grass and luxurious trees. The charming village homes all consist of both stone and brick carvings, divided by small courtyard areas. With its screened walls and large Chinese character paintings at every corridor, the adored aspects of Chinese architecture from this era are on full display. The Chinese characters throughout the homes represent inscriptions from the Ming and Qing dynasty families that previously lived there.

The name of this site, primarily ‘Cuan,’ stands for “the stove.” This appellation gains its suitability in that it served as a shelter from the cold to its inhabitants, as well as safety from the bane of war. The preservation of this site is incredible, I felt like I was walking back in time as I perused the ancient courtyard homes. Spanning over an area of only 2.5 acres, this hillside mountain city is known to the people of Beijing as ‘Potala Palace.’ In this light, Cuandixia village is an idyllic site. Although only recently has this area gained tourist popularity, the attention continues to trickle in at a steady pace. The natural beauty of this area has made it an attractive place for filmmakers, painters, and photographers to visit and capture the splendor. Many who travel to Beijing already have a list of highly famous sites to see first on their list, but a visit to Cuandixia would be a great addition as you gain a present day look into a very real China past.

The Lama Temple.

On July 17, 2012, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Temples, by Jack Li

When you are traveling to Beijing the Lama Temple is not the first place that comes to your mind, there are other more famous and more popular places to go during your Beijing Tour, but if you have a free morning or a free afternoon and you want to see the most astonishing Buddhist temple […]

When you are traveling to Beijing the Lama Temple is not the first place that comes to your mind, there are other more famous and more popular places to go during your Beijing Tour, but if you have a free morning or a free afternoon and you want to see the most astonishing Buddhist temple in Beijing make sure that you don’t miss it!

The Lama temple is the occidental word for the Yonghe Temple, a temple situated in the north-west of Beijing, originally was created as a residence for the court eunuchs but in the year 1722 half of the building was transformed into a lamasery, its popularity raised spectacularly during the following centuries and it became one of the national center of lama administration.

The temple is organized in five main halls and each hall has different attractive on each own so make sure you don’t miss any of them!

  1. The Hall of the Heavenly Kings (Tian Wang Dianor Devaraja), it is the first hall you will find; there are the statues of the Maitreya Buddha (the future Buddha) and the statues of the four heavenly kings in the Buddhist mythology.
  2. The second is Hall of Harmony and Peace (Yonghegong), in this hall there are some of the most precious statues of the temple, the bronze statues of the Buddha of the three ages, The Gautama (present) Kasyapa (past) and the Maitreya (future), in this hall there are also the statues of some Arhats, the Buddhist equivalent of the saints.
  3. The hall of everlasting protection (Youngyoudian) this was the hall where an ancient emperor coffin was placed, but now there is a statue of the healing Buddha who has the mission of healing the suffering.
  4. The Hall of the Wheel of the Law (Falundian), it’s the place where all ceremonies take part, there is the statue of Je Tsongkhapa, the founder of the Geluk school and also the 500 arhat hill, a carved sandalwood hill and statues of the 500 Arhats made of  different metals such as; gold, silver, copper, iron and tin.
  5.  The Pavilion of Ten Thousand Happinesses (Wanfuge), this is the last and the most espectaular hall of the temple for only one reason, it contains a Buddha statue made of a single block of sandalwood that is in the Guiness book of records since 1993.

There are a lot of reasons to visit the Lama temple and its surroundings for there are some of the most typical Hútòng (ancient streets) surrounding the lama temple where you can eat some typical food, buy Buddhist accessories like bracelets or necklaces, or also statues and incense sticks to burn in the halls of the temple.

The lama temple is one of the most beautiful and astonishing places of Beijing, so if you plan to travel to Beijing you have to try to find some time to go there and marvel in front of the magnificent Buddha statues and, maybe, learn more about the Buddhist mythology.

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Enchantment at Yunju Temple

On July 16, 2012, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, Temples, by Jack Li

Picture an entirely Chinese tour group, a Chinese tour guide, and me, one lone American girl traveling 70 km outside of Beijing to reach the stunning Yunju temple. I had no idea what the day would hold for me, I just knew there would be a chance I might be taken out of the usual […]

Picture an entirely Chinese tour group, a Chinese tour guide, and me, one lone American girl traveling 70 km outside of Beijing to reach the stunning Yunju temple. I had no idea what the day would hold for me, I just knew there would be a chance I might be taken out of the usual elements of my comfort zone. Fortunately, in that department, I was not disappointed! I do not have much China travel experience. Thus, when I decided to travel to Beijing I was seeking sights that offer a true portrait of Chinese culture. The tour of Yunju began with the retelling of its stone scripture history. This site is where the actual making of the first stone scripture tablet took place. The decision to carve on stone was to ensure its preservation because at the time there was conflict between the differing religious sectors. The scriptures include important texts known as the Tripitaka in various versions. To date, the Yunju temple houses over 14,000 stone scripture tablets! The tablets hold an extreme amount of religious, spiritual, intellectual and educational value. The multitude of tablets this temple houses makes Yunju temple a shrine to Buddhist culture. I was overwhelmed with the feeling that I was in the presence of a literary history with insurmountable important, not unlike the Rosetta Stone or Code of Hammurabi.

As I made my way through the temple grounds, my eyes feasted upon the nearly two-story bronze vessels, centuries old brick pagodas, and larger than life Buddhist deity statues. My tour then took a turn for the unexpected as I was handed a brown robe and told to put it on and make our way into the temple. I knew this wasn’t an average sightseeing stop for Beijing travel and enjoyed the feeling I was experiencing something unique. There I and my fellow Chinese travelers took part in a Buddhist ritual, involving incense sticks and the entrancing singing of monks. The women and men lined up on separate sides of the room and then repeatedly knelt down for prayer. I knew this was a once and a lifetime experience for me. The centerpiece of the room was a large golden Buddha who sat in front of a table adorned with flowers. Even though I am not a Buddhist, the strong spiritual connections being made within the room were so profound it made an cherished impression on me, adding much to my appreciation for Chinese culture. This Beijing tour should be made an essential addition to your trip. The day spent at Yunju is one I will never forget, and a definite favorite of the time I’ve spent in Beijing.

Summertime at the Summer Palace

On July 9, 2012, in Beijing, Parks & Gardens, Summer Palace, by Jack Li

For a newcomer to China travel like me, the Summer Palace was a must-see Beijing hotspot and beautiful example of Chinese architecture set against the tranquil landscape of Kunming Lake. Constructed over 250 years ago, this visual gem is a great place for tourist groups of any size to take some amazing pictures as well […]

For a newcomer to China travel like me, the Summer Palace was a must-see Beijing hotspot and beautiful example of Chinese architecture set against the tranquil landscape of Kunming Lake. Constructed over 250 years ago, this visual gem is a great place for tourist groups of any size to take some amazing pictures as well as enjoy the Chinese culture. It will cost you a mere 30 RMB to experience all the gorgeous surroundings this park has to offer, and for students with a valid ID its half price! For those who enjoy the outdoors and are looking for a great place to just relax by the water or even burn a few calories on Longevity Hill, the Summer Palace is perfect addition to your China Tours. The natural environment of this palace can be attributed to the exquisite garden design and landscaping. It’s unlike anything I have ever seen! No wonder the Chinese name for this attraction literally means “Gardens of Nurtured Harmony.” With scenic views and structures fit for royalty, this palace served as a peaceful residence for many Qing Dynasty ruling family members. As you ascend the hill, you’ll find yourself trekking up some large rocks so make sure to wear comfortable shoes. You can get some good pictures if you are ready and willing to climb up on some of the rocks and look out over the whole hillside.

Dispersed over the hill are a number of stunning buildings such as the Sea of Wisdom Temple, the Cloud Dispelling Hall, and the Temple of Buddhist Virtue, where the Tower of Buddhist Incense takes center stage. This impressive three story tower is the major focal point of the Summer Palace. After coming down the hill’s opposite side, the biggest treat of my day was walking along the lake and watching the boats pass by. Food and souvenir vendors are plentiful. Personally, I purchased a decorated fan and a vanilla ice cream cone to help keep cool in the Beijing summer heat. There were also a handful of skilled performers throughout the grounds ready to entertain passing crowds with Chinese acrobatics or traditional music. At the lake, paddle boats can be rented as well as tickets for boat rides at a reasonable price; I highly recommend these options. Nothing beats getting out on the water on a hot summer day! Closer to the edges outer edges of the lake, the water is covered with the pleasing green hue of massive lily pads. Stretching out across the lake is a multiple arch bridge, where you can join in on some kite flying. The entire park is huge, almost 750 acres, so give yourself plenty of time because a single visit can take up the whole day. There’s so much to see in Beijing, but make sure the Summer Palace is a priority place to visit. Your travel to Beijing won’t be complete without indulging in all this natural elegance.

 

Stairs on Stairs on Stairs

On June 25, 2012, in China Attractions, Cool Places, Historical Relics, Must-sees, by Jack Li

Today marks the third week since I got off the string of Beijing flights that I took on my way to China, and I’ve finally seen the Great Wall of China.  Whenever I contacted friends or family back in the US their first question whenever I mentioned that I was in China was always “have you […]

Today marks the third week since I got off the string of Beijing flights that I took on my way to China, and I’ve finally seen the Great Wall of China.  Whenever I contacted friends or family back in the US their first question whenever I mentioned that I was in China was always “have you seen the wall yet?”  No matter who you are, China travel is not complete without a trip to the Great Wall, and believe me, your friends and family will let you know it.

The Great Wall of China on a foggy dayWe went to the Mutianyu section of the wall, famous for the massive toboggan slide that you can ride down the side of it.  Unfortunately when we went it started raining and the slide was closed, so the thrill seekers amongst us were a tad disappointed.  Just seeing the slide from above was insane: it was massive, full of twists and turns, and led from the top of the wall down to ground level.  It looks epic, and I know I’m going to try to make it down again on a clearer day.

We quickly got over the rain, and faced the wall.  A few of us who are fans of barefoot running decided to tackle the wall barefoot rather than getting our shoes wet.  While I wouldn’t recommend this to anyone not experienced with barefoot running/walking, it was a lot of fun.  The stones were all smooth and cool from the rain and I felt connected to
the wall and the history behind it.  We also had great traction on the slippery stones.

As an upside of the rain, the wall was mostly empty when we climbed it.  We ran back and forth in both directions, scrambled up the steps, climbed up on rocks, and took an absurd amount of pictures.  Because of the clouds our pictures didn’t have the immense sweeping views that you can find online, but I like the fog, it adds a mythical feel to the wall.

The wall is incomprehensibly huge, and extremely high up on the mountain.  There are ski lifts that take you up, or you can make the hike up yourself.  Be sure to bring snacks and water, some are available on top of the wall but for a much higher price than on the ground.  The wall is a bit of a hike from Beijing, and if you have a big group like us it makes the most sense to rent a van for the day that will cart you to and from the wall.  There are also Beijing Tours that will take you to and from the wall if you’re in a smaller group, our just want a more guided experience.  Happy Hiking!

The Silk Market Strikes Back

On June 18, 2012, in Beijing, Shopping, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

This past Saturday my fellow interns and I gathered together our wallets, poker faces, and headed over to the silk market as a much anticipated part of our China travel, .  We returned with lighter wallets, and lots of swag.  Here are some more tips for buying anything at the Silk Market when you travel to Beijing: Get […]

This past Saturday my fellow interns and I gathered together our wallets, poker faces, and headed over to the silk market as a much anticipated part of our China travel, .  We returned with lighter wallets, and lots of swag.  Here are some more tips for buying anything at the Silk Market when you travel to Beijing:

Get used to saying No

If you aren’t saying no much more than you say yes, then you’re doing it wrong.  Most vendors’ first price will be in the stratosphere (Someone tried to sell me a t-shirt for 500 RMB, see you there) and they will try to get the highest price out of you that you are willing to pay.  Don’t even consider the early prices, give a firm “NO” and tell them much lower price that you would like to say.  Stay firm with your price, and don’t feel the need to raise your number every time they lower theirs.  One of my friends fell into this trap, she spent too much time thinking about offered prices, and she let her price gradually rise.  Give the vendors an inch and they will take a mile, they’re very good and what they do.  When the vendor gets into range of my price, however, I’ll usually try to meet them halfway.  This relentless stubbornness, coupled with a little giving at the end has worked well for me.

Use a strong team

If possible, travel to the markets with someone who is as willing to negotiate as hard as you are.  My friend and I acted as a team for anything item that either of us wanted to purchase.  Since I was not invested in his purchases, and he was not invested in mine, we were always able to save the other from a bad deal and get a better price.  Don’t underestimate the power of teamwork.  That being said, the vendors will try to appeal to everyone in your group, be it children, parents, significant others, or insignificant others to buy their wares.  Be sure that everyone is on the same page before you begin to bargain.

You’ll get better deals late at night

As it gets later and later vendors just want to unload their stuff.  Bargaining takes less time and vendors are more willing to accept your price than they are earlier in the day.  The two caveats to keep in mind are that some of the stalls close before the rest close at 9PM, and you will be one of the few customers still in the market, so everyone’s attention will be directed at you.

Everyone has the same stuff

With the exception of only a few stalls that sell unique handmade goods, most of the vendors are selling basically the same thing.  Don’t get attached to any stall or owner, if the two of you can’t agree on a price walk away.  You might get a better price and if not who cares, you can try your hand at bargaining for the same thing at the next stall.  Also – If any of the vendors are rude to you (one of them said my friend was ugly and no one would remember him) then don’t buy anything from them, move on to the next one.  There are too many nice people there trying to make a living to worry yourself with the bad eggs.

 

The Silk Market is a great stop to make on your Beijing Tours.  Good luck, happy bargaining.

Ritan Park

On May 21, 2012, in Beijing, Historical Relics, Parks & Gardens, by Jack Li

Following on from the Jianguomen diplomatic area and close by to some excellent Beijing hotels lays Ritan Park. This is a lovely spot for everybody and anybody who is going to travel to Beijing. What’s more, this park is free, so suits anyone who wants to combine some historical sightseeing with a few leisurely pursuits. […]

Following on from the Jianguomen diplomatic area and close by to some excellent Beijing hotels lays Ritan Park. This is a lovely spot for everybody and anybody who is going to travel to Beijing. What’s more, this park is free, so suits anyone who wants to combine some historical sightseeing with a few leisurely pursuits.

Only in the 1950s did Ritan Park form; because before, that it was the sacred site for the Temple of the Sun which was built in 1530. The benefit of the park being free to enter provides the added bonus of being able to observe sights which under most circumstances you would pay to view. Despite most of the historical sites in the park not in their original states, they are nevertheless intriguing. Moreover, here’s a tip, if you don’t feel like paying the entrance fee to the renowned Temple of Heaven, but want to experience ancient holy sites in Beijing, then a trip the Ritan park is always another option. Amongst the most notably relics include; the mural on ritual sacrifices to the sun and the circular mound altar. The red colouring of the walls around the relics clearly highlights that the purpose of the temple was for sun worship. Consequently, due to the historical importance of the place, in 2006, the government designated the park as a State Protected Historic Site.

Equally, another significant historical site is the burial place of Ma Jun, a revolutionary deemed a martyr. Before entering this very tranquil section of the park through a portal-shaped arch, you will have the pleasure of listening to a recording (from a tree-stump like speaker) in both Chinese and English. Through the arch is a rose-looking garden called the ‘senior citizen’s activity area’ with the tomb, memorial and exhibition hall of Ma Jun situated behind.

The park is, nonetheless, a popular place in which many foreigners frequent and is full of modern activities for all the family to enjoy. Indeed, the park attracts many locals with its outdoor gym, table tennis and impressive climbing walls. The wall itself is an excellent attraction in
which to partake regardless of your climbing ability; or, if preferred, to watch others attempt to courageous scale the great height. The cost of climbing for day is 30RMB and one climbs totals 10RMB which sounds like a fair price. Other exciting activities in the park are is the children’s amusement fairground for those who don’t mind spinning around, then there is water-zorbing at the spring garden!

For a more laid-back approach, take a stroll down the south-western section of the park. Here you will find some idyllic waters surrounding by rockeries and sip on a drink on the stone boat on the lake. Pavilions, peonies and people are all plentiful in this most peaceful of parks. Anybody who is thinking of arranging or taking Beijing flights might want to take into account the splendid Ritan Park.

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The Mystical Laoxiangfeng

On April 25, 2012, in Adventure Trip, More Places of Interest, Nature Scenery, by Jack Li

This article refers to just one of countless scenic spots which can be viewed at leisure along your China travel experience. Roughly 80 kilometres from Beijing, Laoxiangfeng is a prime location for travellers to take a break from the busy city-life. Encompassing 4,000 hectares, Laoxiangfeng is certainly a playground for the outdoor-types. To get to this […]

This article refers to just one of countless scenic spots which can be viewed at leisure along your China travel experience. Roughly 80 kilometres from Beijing, Laoxiangfeng is a prime location for travellers to take a break from the busy city-life. Encompassing 4,000 hectares, Laoxiangfeng is certainly a playground for the outdoor-types. To get to this beautiful location, you can either consider  China tours or alternatively take bus number 5 to Laoxiangfeng (before taking the 918 bus from Dongzhimenwai-Guanzhuang Daokou). From the mountain gate, walkers will also need to pay an admission fee  (approx.20rmb)  and the mountain park stays open from 8am to 6:30pm.

According to Chinese legend, Laoxiangfeng Shan (‘Shan’ which means mountain) is where the goddess Bixia Yuanjun played an important role in local folklore. The story goes that the two gods, Bixia Yuanjun and Panshan Laozu were vying to ride the holy elephant. A dice was eventually thrown leaving Bixia Yuanjun as the winner. Thereafter, she would care for the elephant around the area which was given the name ‘Laoxiangfeng’ (‘Elder Elephant Peak’). Needless to say, by using your imaginative powers, you will be able to discern the peak into the shape of an elephant! Interestingly, the locality also incorporates the themes of friendship and loyalty. For example, Bixia Yuanjun, one day, protected the elephant by breaking the claw off the tiger which attacked it and that peak would later become ‘Tiger Claw Peak’ (also a good spot to view). Another tale mentions of a couple who wanted to learn from Bixia Yuanjun; yet because the goddess thought they were unready she gave them a test. The couple failed the test and they were tragically turned into stone.

On a practical level, walking up the mountain is made enjoyable for a couple of reasons. Firstly, the path is wide and flat for the majority of the distance so it is not especially strenuous on the knees. However, the path does get steeper when heading towards the peak and note that the path also acts as a road, although cars are relatively infrequent. Secondly, there are ample picnic areas and toilet facilities along the route (which in itself indicates the popularity of the area). Nearer the bottom of the route, there are gaping valleys which provide excellent opportunities to take pictures of the surroundings and have lunch under the canopied sitting areas.

As a little extra, the walk is made rather interesting by reading the many descriptions along the way. In particular, some of the indigenous flora takes precedence in the local legends of the mountain. One tale mentions, for example, how the fairy of the chrysanthemums left her garland in the ground with later transformed in the radiant flowers which can be seen today. Without doubt, the vegetation of Laoxiangfeng is special for locals and visitors alike. Locals, for one, can be seen collecting mushrooms on the wooded slopes of the mountain (which in turn can be bought in the store at the bottom of the peak). The nearest place to Laoxiangfeng is Xiaoyuzi Village; but if you are seeking China hotels, Dahuashan Town, in general, may have more choice.

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