The Best Western Eats in Beijing

On July 27, 2012, in Beijing, Restaurants, Restaurants & Food, by Jack Li

After having my share of delicious Chinese dishes with noodles, dumplings, and plenty of rice, a Western girl like me was starting to crave some familiar foods during my travel in Beijing. Fortunately, there are a number of wonderful restaurants in this city that offer all types of cuisine from Belgian, to Italian, to a […]

After having my share of delicious Chinese dishes with noodles, dumplings, and plenty of rice, a Western girl like me was starting to crave some familiar foods during my travel in Beijing. Fortunately, there are a number of wonderful restaurants in this city that offer all types of cuisine from Belgian, to Italian, to a good ole American-style cheeseburger. One of my favorite Beijing tours, I must confess, has been the ‘gourmet’ tour I have taken myself on, trying out various eateries in the area. So for any expats coming to Beijing, here are a few places I would like to recommend.

The Tree

For those looking for a mouthwatering pizza and pint of draught beer, make your way to The Tree. A regular stop for Beijing’s European community, this welcoming tavern in Sanlitun is best known for its Belgian whites and assorted stone oven baked pizzas. Decorated to resemble an authentic Belgian inn, it’s a favorite for families looking to grab a good meal come early in the evening, but it is also carries it usual crowd of drinkers who gather along the convivial brick-built bar.

If you have Italian on the mind, Annie’s is the ultimate must-do. The many awards and recognition it has received will not mislead you, this place is incredible. This gem of the Chaoyang district is a casual, cozy and tremendously welcoming bistro. It is a hands-down the best affordable Italian fare in Beijing. I recommend ordering a crisp pizza with thin dough bottom and rich stuffing. Save room for a delectable cannoli for dessert! These little devils are a tempting blend of cottage cheese and dried fruit with a touch of brandy in a fresh shell of fried dough. The staff here is super friendly, and don’t be surprised if you find yourself smiling throughout your entire experience there.

I am the stereotypical American girl. My daily diet favorites center on meat, bread, and cheese, and if it’s fried that’s even better. When I heard about Steak and Eggs, it didn’t take long before my wallet and I were on our way out the door. Offering classic American diner fare, this restaurant is the perfect place to grab an inexpensive Sunday breakfast. It’s also a great place for families! As the regular crowds of expats will confirm, the food here is extremely authentic. In one bite I was transported back to my native roots with my taste buds serving as the vehicle. The menu is chock-full of hearty burgers, apple pie and bottomless cups of coffee. Any American expat feeling homesick can come here for a little taste of comfort.

Element Fresh

The last place on my list today is Element Fresh. After getting my juicy, greasy, cheesy cravings satisfied, it’s equally important to find a place where I can just get a healthy, substantial meal. At Element Fresh, this is exactly what you will find, tons of variety and all delicious. Originally started in Shanghai, this restaurant provides nutritious Western food including salads, smoothies and sandwiches. They have a popular weekend brunch as well as including reasonably priced fare and quality drinks. I hope you get the chance to visit one or all of these places during your Beijing travels. I guarantee you will not be disappointed!

 

 

Enchantment at Yunju Temple

On July 16, 2012, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, Temples, by Jack Li

Picture an entirely Chinese tour group, a Chinese tour guide, and me, one lone American girl traveling 70 km outside of Beijing to reach the stunning Yunju temple. I had no idea what the day would hold for me, I just knew there would be a chance I might be taken out of the usual […]

Picture an entirely Chinese tour group, a Chinese tour guide, and me, one lone American girl traveling 70 km outside of Beijing to reach the stunning Yunju temple. I had no idea what the day would hold for me, I just knew there would be a chance I might be taken out of the usual elements of my comfort zone. Fortunately, in that department, I was not disappointed! I do not have much China travel experience. Thus, when I decided to travel to Beijing I was seeking sights that offer a true portrait of Chinese culture. The tour of Yunju began with the retelling of its stone scripture history. This site is where the actual making of the first stone scripture tablet took place. The decision to carve on stone was to ensure its preservation because at the time there was conflict between the differing religious sectors. The scriptures include important texts known as the Tripitaka in various versions. To date, the Yunju temple houses over 14,000 stone scripture tablets! The tablets hold an extreme amount of religious, spiritual, intellectual and educational value. The multitude of tablets this temple houses makes Yunju temple a shrine to Buddhist culture. I was overwhelmed with the feeling that I was in the presence of a literary history with insurmountable important, not unlike the Rosetta Stone or Code of Hammurabi.

As I made my way through the temple grounds, my eyes feasted upon the nearly two-story bronze vessels, centuries old brick pagodas, and larger than life Buddhist deity statues. My tour then took a turn for the unexpected as I was handed a brown robe and told to put it on and make our way into the temple. I knew this wasn’t an average sightseeing stop for Beijing travel and enjoyed the feeling I was experiencing something unique. There I and my fellow Chinese travelers took part in a Buddhist ritual, involving incense sticks and the entrancing singing of monks. The women and men lined up on separate sides of the room and then repeatedly knelt down for prayer. I knew this was a once and a lifetime experience for me. The centerpiece of the room was a large golden Buddha who sat in front of a table adorned with flowers. Even though I am not a Buddhist, the strong spiritual connections being made within the room were so profound it made an cherished impression on me, adding much to my appreciation for Chinese culture. This Beijing tour should be made an essential addition to your trip. The day spent at Yunju is one I will never forget, and a definite favorite of the time I’ve spent in Beijing.

Central Business District, Beijing

On August 25, 2011, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Cool Places, Nightlife, Shopping, by Jack Li

Beijing’s Central Business District, or more commonly known as CBD is the main area of finance, media and business services in the capital. It covers about 4 kilometers squared of the Chaoyang District, in the eastern part of the city. China has become a global economic giant, and the CBD is at the heart of […]

Beijing’s Central Business District, or more commonly known as CBD is the main area of finance, media and business services in the capital. It covers about 4 kilometers squared of the Chaoyang District, in the eastern part of the city. China has become a global economic giant, and the CBD is at the heart of the nation’s business transactions. The District has attracted 117 Fortune 500 companies in the financial, consulting, IT and media sectors. The CBD is home to many of the world’s most impressive skyscrapers as well as Beijing Hotels. These include: the China World Trade Centre, the CCTV Headquarters, Fortune Plaza, Beijing TV Centre and the Beijing Yintai Centre. You would probably see these skyscrapers from your Air China flight when you are approaching the capital.

On one of my first few days in Beijing, I woke up a bit late so there was no time to go and visit the major sites, so I thought since I’ve only got the afternoon free, I’ll take a walk down the Business District, and I am so pleased that I did. I even came back one evening, because the skyline looks even more stunning at nighttime.

My personal favorite is the China World Trade Centre Tower III (right), not to be confused with the China World Trade Centre. TowerIII has 81 floors and 30 elevators (which travel at 10 meters per second!). Completed in 2009, this architectural giant stands 330 meters tall. It is thus the tallest skyscraper in Beijing. It serves many purposes. Firstly, it houses an exquisite 278 room 5-star hotel. Offices occupy the building up till the 55th floor. The 79th till 81st floor is special. It is home to one of the finest bars and restaurants in Beijing. Imagine sipping on a martini 300 meters high whilst overlooking one of the most spectacular cities in the world. It was a great experience. When I come back to Beijing, my first nightspot visit will be the bar at the top of the China World Trade Centre Tower III.

The China World Trade Centre is a group of buildings of which Tower III belongs to. It has everything from a hotel to an exhibition hall, offices and even a high-end shopping mall called China World Mall. Not only does it have Fendi, Hermes, Tod’s, Christian Dior, Shanghai Tang, Armani stores and boutiques, it also has an ice skating rink. So after you’ve been to the shops, bought a few things the best way to recover from the open-wallet surgery is to cool off and wind-down on the ice.

Another important attraction at the CBD is of course the CCTV Tower (left). As you can see from the picture, it is a very unique piece of architecture. It is 234 meters high (44 stories). It is the headquarters for China Central Television (CCTV), the major state television broadcaster in Mainland China. Due to its unorthodox shape, it is said that a taxi driver once nicknamed it, ‘da kucha’ which roughly translates to ‘big boxer shorts.’

The CBD is one of the most remarkable financial districts in the world, equally as impressive as Canary Wharf in London, or Wall Street. Sure, it may not be tourist attractions per say, however it is still well worth a visit when you Travel to Beijing.

 

Are the Chinese Pots?

On August 22, 2011, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, Tours, by Jack Li

As well as having worldwide renowned sights China also has many other cultural experiences to offer. The talent of China is on display in every street and the industry of the Chinese work force can be seen around the cities everywhere. Travel to Beijing and see why china has the best manufacturing capacity in the […]

As well as having worldwide renowned sights China also has many other cultural experiences to offer. The talent of China is on display in every street and the industry of the Chinese work force can be seen around the cities everywhere. Travel to Beijing and see why china has the best manufacturing capacity in the world. As an emerging world force China is advancing in technology and manual labor is declining. However, there is still very much an emphasis on the heritage and traditional methods of producing native ornaments and intricate local items such as pots and vases’. (Beijing Tours)

Chinese ceramics are an ancient art form that date back to the pre-dynastic periods. In china it is one of the most significant art forms and over the years it has emerged as a major form of Chinese design. China is embedded with lots of the raw materials that are needed for making these intricate pieces. This almost gives china a monopoly status amongst the pottery making business. The porcelain used to make these objects is more commonly know as “china” in English.

 

The development of these ceramics has lead to different styles and designs being associated with different times in history. However, the processes behind making the pieces have not changed at all since the early days of pot making. This is evident when visiting the small factories in which these pieces are made. One or two highly skilled individuals whom have been passed on their skills from their older generations carefully carry out each stage of the production.

 

The first stage of the production is making the shape of the desired piece. By carefully sculpting the shape several times the final body of the item is placed in a furnace where it is heated then rapidly cooled. After the main body of the ornament is created, the product goes through many stages of refinement to get a professional and perfect shape. The design that will be transferred onto the ceramic item is carefully drawn out by an artist. This is then outlined with a golden wire. Enamel pigments are then used to color the different sections of the design, this process is very time consuming and requires an extremely steady hand. Once again the finished pot is put into a blast furnace that is heated to over 1000 degrees for a final 10 to 15 minuets. Once the pot comes out it is very dirty and has to be polished. Different grades of stone are used to give the item shine and a silk like finish.

 

This process is time consuming, however, the end result is majestic. This very process has had very little amendments throughout the years and continued to produce timeless classics. However, this industry is starting to become extremely valued as the amount of specialist skilled workers is decreasing. This is threatening the viability of continuing to produce these ornaments. The supply is still very much in ascendancy making it difficult to keep the price of the objects low, hence the more desired pieces are becoming rare collectors items that come at a price.

 

It is a shame that such a beautiful method of making ornaments is becoming extinct. The risk of losing such a precious Chinese culture is a sad moment in ceramic history. Therefore, in order for you not to miss your chance to cash in on some future collectables book your China Flights now!

 

Il Leone d’Oro(Three Chinese Nominations)

On August 22, 2011, in Accomodation, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

Il Leone d’Oro (English: The Golden Lion) is the highest prize given to a film at the Venice Film Festival. The prize was introduced in 1949 by the organizing committee and is now regarded as one of the film industry’s most distinguished prizes. In 1970, a second Golden Lion was introduced; this is an honorary […]

Il Leone d’Oro (English: The Golden Lion) is the highest prize given to a film at the Venice Film Festival. The prize was introduced in 1949 by the
organizing committee and is now regarded as one of the film industry’s most distinguished prizes. In 1970, a second Golden Lion was introduced; this is an
honorary award for people who have made an important contribution to cinema. While no Chinese film has been entered in the competition section of the Cannes International Film Festival this summer, there will be three competitors for the Golden Lion, book your China Flights through Air China and come to see where were this movies made.

Hong Kong director Johnnie To’s new work Life Without Principle has been added to the lineup of the 68th Venice International Film Festival, officials revealed recently. The heist flick tells of how a financial analyst, a thug and a cop, who share a desperate need for money, are linked when a bag of stolen money worth $5 million appears.

“This is a turbulent world, and in order to survive people have no choice but to play the game,” To says about the film in a statement released by the festival organizers. “No matter how hard you try to follow the rules, sooner or later, a part of you will be lost.” This is the third time the 56-year-old will see his work competing in the festival. However, neither of his other two films, Exiled and The Mad Detective, picked up an award.

To directs and produces the film, which stars Lau Ching Wan, Denise Ho and Terence Yin. Another veteran Hong Kong filmmaker, Ann Hui, will challenge To with A Simple Life. The tearjerker is based on a real story about the film’s producer Roger Lee and a family servant, who took care of him for more than 60 years. For Lee, the film is a tribute to his old friend, now dead. Hong Kong’s superstar Andy Lau and senior actress Deanie Ip lead the film, marking their first venture together in 23 years. Unlike To and Hui, 43-year-old Wei Te-sheng from Taiwan is a newcomer to the industry, with just one film, the 2008 romantic hit Cape No 7, under his belt.

Wei joins the competition with an ambitious work titled Seediq Bale, literally “A Real Man”. The 135-minute film depicts Taiwan aboriginal Seediq’s fight against the Japanese rulers in 1930. John Woo produces the film, starring Taiwan actress Vivian Hsu and Landy Wen.

This year’s Venice festival runs from Aug 31 to Sept 10 and includes a “surprise film”, a feature introduced by director Marco Muller, when he took over in
2004. In all, 23 films are in the run for the Golden Lion this year. Make your China Travel to see this wonderful country and his cinematrographic culture.

What is the time? Time to visit the Bell and Drum towers

On July 18, 2011, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Shopping, by Jack Li

The Bell and Drum Towers are beautifully constructed buildings and were originally used as musical instruments. However since the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220) they have been used to tell the time. This site takes you back in time to old Beijing. Get Beijing Flights and Travel to Beijing now to visit this wonderful area. When […]

The Bell and Drum Towers are beautifully constructed buildings and were originally used as musical instruments. However since the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220) they have been used to tell the time. This site takes you back in time to old Beijing. Get Beijing Flights and Travel to Beijing now to visit this wonderful area.

When the towers were used to tell the time the bell would ring to signal that it was morning, while the drum signified dusk. During the Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties (1271-1911) they played a vital role in the lives of Beijingers, as they had no other way of telling the time. As the towers were so important they were constructed in almost every city in China. However the ones in Beijing are the largest and highest. Traditionally the two towers should be next to each other however in Beijing they are opposite one another, lying on the north-south axis.

They are located in the Dongcheng district and are symbolic to this old city area. They were built in 1272, however they had to be rebuilt after experiencing two fires.

Bell Tower

The Bell Tower has the largest and heaviest bell in China. The Bell is 7.02m (23 feet) casino online high and weighs an incredible 63 tons (138,891 pounds.) It creates a clear sound that travels great distances because it is made of copper.

Drum Tower 

The Drum Tower is 100m (109 yards) to the south of the Bell Tower. It was built onto a 4m high (13 feet) stone and brick base. The tower is 46.7m (153 feet) high, where as the Bell Tower is slightly taller at 47.9m (157 feet.) Originally there were 24 small drums and one large one within the tower. Today only the large one remains. The drum was beaten quickly for 18 times and then slowly for 18 times. The same was the case with the bell because in ancient times this demonstrated one year.

When the last emperor of China, called Pu Yi, left the Forbidden City the bells and drums stopped being used to tell the time. Fortunately nowadays they are used on Chinese New Years Eve. This is done to send a blessing to the Chinese people.

Located south of the Drum Tower are the original hutongs. These are picturesque side streets that are hundreds of years old. Beijing families have lived in this area for generations and it is fascinating to explore the old way of life. The street is called Yandai Xiejie, as ‘yandai’ is a Chinese pipe that was traditionally sold there. Today this street sells everything from traditional Chinese food to handcrafted items. If you want a Chinese tea set or beautiful silk items this is the place to go.

Next to Yandai Xiejie is Houhai Lake and Qianhai Lake. This is an idyllic place to escape from the hustle and bustle of Beijing. It is the perfect spot to admire the Bell and Drum Towers, through the willow trees. Children play while the elderly play cards and dominoes in the streets. Why not take a rickshaw ride around the lakes or hire a bike?

The Bell Tower is 15 CNY and the Drum Tower is 20 CNY. They are open all day and are very accessible. Just take Subway Line 2 and get off at Guloudajie at Exit B. Then walk south for 10 minutes.

Beijing Tours are an easy and affordable way to see the best of what Beijing has to offer, so book it now before time runs out!

Venture out of Beijing to the Ming Tombs

On July 7, 2011, in Cultural Experience, Tours, by Jack Li

  A trip with China Tours helps you to explore the wonderful Chinese culture. Take an expedition to the Ming Tombs; it is an experience you will never forget! The Ming Tombs are located 50 kilometres northwest of Beijing. Booking Beijing Flights are easy and affordable with the fantastic opportunity to visit this site. The Ming […]

 

A trip with China Tours helps you to explore the wonderful Chinese culture. Take an expedition to the Ming Tombs; it is an experience you will never forget! The Ming Tombs are located 50 kilometres northwest of Beijing. Booking Beijing Flights are easy and affordable with the fantastic opportunity to visit this site. The Ming Tombs are full of Chinese history so do not miss out!

13 emperors from the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are buried here and have been perfectly preserved. Each mausoleum has a unique structure and size, however they are all arranged in the same way.

The location was originally built for Emperor Zhu Di and his empresses. Their grave, known as Changling, is well worth a visit as it is the most magnificent of all the mausoleums. Changling is the chief of the Ming tombs and is the largest. The main building alone has an internal area of 1956 square metres. An incredible 32 posts support it, with the largest measuring 14 metres in height. 

Another vault that must be viewed by visitors is the Dingling burial, which unlike Changling is 27 metres underground. It is the mausoleum of Emperor Zhu Yijun, who occupied the throne for the longest time during the Ming Dynasty. The main features of this burial place are the Stone Bridge, Soul Tower, Baocheng and Underground Palace. The Soul Tower has symbolic meaning of the whole Dingling and forms the entrance to the chambers below. This location is a sea of yellow as colourful titles cover every eave, rafter and column. This really is a beautifully constructed grave that will nbso take your breath away.

Unfortunately, the Changling and Dingling tombs are the only ones open to the public. However the mausoleums are open from 8.30 am to around 5.30 pm.

There is so much to see at the Ming tombs but the Ling’en Palace has to be seen while exploring this fascinating site. It is located in the second yard and is the only huge palace made of camphor wood. You will not believe your eyes when you see the brightly painted ceiling, 16 solid camphor posts and gleaming floor made of gold bricks.

As the Ming Tombs are rich in history and architectural work the site has lots of cultural value and is very accessible from Beijing. For example you could take the special tourist bus 872, which runs every 30 minutes. Alternatively get the subway line 5 to Tiantongyuan Bei Station and then get the Changpig bus 23.

 

 While visiting the Ming tombs why not take a trip over to see the Badaling Great Wall. This is one of the best locations to explore the wall and is easily reached from the mausoleums. All you have to do is get on the number 314 bus from Dingling or Changling and get off at Ming Huang La Xiang. Then take bus number 919 to Badaling Great Wall.

When you Travel to Beijing you must explore the Ming tombs, as it is an incredibly famous attraction that is alive with Chinese culture and history.

Chinese Martial Arts

On July 6, 2011, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, by Jack Li

China Travel can open your eyes to this wonderful culture, and allow you to gain an understanding of historic martial arts. The Chinese have been practising these rituals for centuries. Travel to Beijing to see traditional martial arts being practised in its original setting.     This unique sport is often referred to as ‘Wushu’ or […]

China Travel can open your eyes to this wonderful culture, and allow you to gain an understanding of historic martial arts. The Chinese have been practising these rituals for centuries. Travel to Beijing to see traditional martial arts being practised in its original setting.

   

This unique sport is often referred to as ‘Wushu’ or ‘Kung Fu.’ The traits of this activity have been passed on for generations, through Chinese families or Martial Art schools. The exercises have been inspired by the country’s philosophies, various religions and legends.

This Chinese cultural activity was thought to have orginated from the Xia Dynasty, over 4000 years ago. It was developed for self defense, for hunting and to train Chinese militants. Wushu can take a physical or weaponary form of defense and was taught to ancient soldiers so that they could defend their country during wars.

Today, it is a pastime that many Chinese people practise to keep fit and relieve stress. Martial arts can improve muscular and cardiovascular fitness and has become popular throughout the world. However undoubtedly the best place to see it is in the traditional parks and tranquil locations throughout China. For example, in Beijing elderly people often practise Tai Chi in the parks. Feel free to join in and discover how enjoyable it is. If you want to  experience this fascinating leisure persuit ask local artists nbso online casino reviews if you can get involved.

When visiting Beijing the best place to see or practise martial arts is in the gardens surrounding the Temple of Heaven, in the southern part of the city. It is recommended to go there at sunrise. This is because most Chinese martial artists perform at this time, as part of their daily ritual.

The most convenient and cheapest way to get to the Temple of Heaven is via the subway. It only costs 2 Yuan per trip (about 20 British pence.) To get there you must get on the number 2 (blue line) to Chongwenmen station. The subway begins operating at 6 in the morning and is open until 11 at night.

Martial art styles vary between provinces and cities throughout China. Therefore the way in which Beijingers perform this art is different to the ‘Shanghainese’ interpretation.

China Tours are the perfect way to gain a detailed insight into Chinese culture, including the martial art rituals.

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Hutongs- A world away from bustling Beijing

On July 6, 2011, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Festivals, by Jack Li

  When you often think of Beijing you think of the numerous historical sites and the thriving business district. Beijingers and tourists a like rush around the city, but rarely slow down to notice the hidden gem of the city; The Hutongs. These are the old neighbourhoods where locals have lived for centuries. If you […]

 

When you often think of Beijing you think of the numerous historical sites and the thriving business district. Beijingers and tourists a like rush around the city, but rarely slow down to notice the hidden gem of the city; The Hutongs. These are the old neighbourhoods where locals have lived for centuries. If you want to experience the traditional Chinese culture book a Beijing flight with Air China now!

Located only a few kilometres away from Tiananmen Square, in the heart of Beijing stands the old alleyways of the Hutongs. The word ‘hutong’ was originally thought to have meant ‘water well’ in Mongolian and they were first developed in the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368 AD.) The definition of a Hutong is a street that is 9 meters wide or less. Originally there were 29 Hutongs in Beijing, which were home to court officials and noblemen. However now traditional Chinese families live there, just like the generations before them. It is common to find courtyards made up of many one-level family units that reveal an authentic way of life. The Hutongs are renowned for their big community spirit and relaxed atmosphere. Many elderly residents sit in the alleyways chatting in Mandarin or playing Chinese chess, while the children play outside their homes. The scene is so simple yet admirable.

Even though the development of the city has threatened the existence of the Hutongs online casino on many occasions, most areas have remained unchanged for 700 years. However in the 1980s a large section of a Hutong was bulldozed down to allow for high-rise apartments to be built. Fortunately since then the government has recognised that the Hutongs are part of Beijing’s cultural heritage and therefore aim to preserve the area.

The best way to see the Hutongs is to walk around them and get lost in their historic ambience. While you are visiting the Hutongs you must take a rickshaw ride down the winding alleyways to see the homes of the real Chinese people. When exploring the Hutongs you must realise that they are not just small quaint buildings; they represent the traditional Chinese way of life.

The time to visit the Hutongs is during festivals or holidays as they are a sea of red, covered with lanterns and paper cut outs. This tradition has been followed for centuries and highlights the community spirit.

 

If you really want to learn about the Chinese culture Travel to Beijing and visit the Hutongs.

Fenghuang, an ancient town in Hunan province

On April 14, 2011, in Chinese Towns & Villages, Other Regions, Travel Info, by Jack Li

If you feel in a fret or stressful ,you can book a fight of China Southern Airlines and have China Tours to Fenghuang ,Hunan where you can clam down yourself ,but you should avoiding going there in labor Day or National Day or other important Festivals. Fenghuang has wonderful natural landscapes,it’s very hot for travelling […]

If you feel in a fret or stressful ,you can book a fight of China Southern Airlines and have China Tours to Fenghuang ,Hunan where you can clam down yourself ,but you should avoiding going there in labor Day or National Day or other important Festivals.

Fenghuang has wonderful natural landscapes,it’s very hot for travelling all the time ,even where a lot of teleplays were producted . Besides such beautiful scenery,Fenghuang is also a cradle for famous people,such as Congwen Shen spending their childhood here. Regarded as one of the nation’s most charming towns in China, it was first remarked upon by Westerners over half a century ago.

 

The town is situate on the western boundary of Hunan Province in an area of outstanding natural beauty where mountains ,water and blue skies prevail.Upon entering the town the visitor will be impress by its air of mystery ,elegance and primitive simplicity.This is a world that is dominated by the colour green.There are lots of fantastic views ,such as Tuo River, East Gate tower, Former Residence of Shen, huangsi Bridge city, Tuo Diaojiaolou and so on.

Tuo River is the cradle of Fenghuang, she slowly flowing under the walls, nurtured generations of city children. Black ships sit, listening to the chant Shaogong, watching the two sides over a century old Tujia Diaojiaolou, do not have some charm. Sailing down through the south of Yangtze River Hongqiao a picture of it to appear in front of you: Longevity Palace, thousands of towers, Tsui House wins away from the earth … … the feeling of a leisurely life. The south is the ancient city wall Tuojiang with purple sand brick, elegant yet magnificent. Walls are the east, north two towers, well the vicissitudes of life, is still spectacular. Tuo river clear, the wall side of the river is very shallow, slow water flow, you can see the gentle waves of unassuming plants, you can pole a boat upstream verdant. Built along the edge of the houses on stilts Tuojiang group at the East Gate and North Gate of Hongqiao jump rock near the small foot stand in the Tuo River in Lingding, never to come back as a landscape.

The Miao ethnic minority is predominantly settled here and a visit to a Miao village is a must when going to Feng Huang Cheng. The Miao women have a natural beauty that renders the use of cosmetics quite unnecessary. They love to dress in traditional blue garments set off with a white scarf. They love also their silver jewellery especially during festivals. Visitors will find a large array of hand made items of silver ornaments for sale in the local shops. Home made tie-dyes, printed and batik cloths are other local specialities that make wonderful souvenirs. The Miao are friendly and hospitable and like nothing more than to interact with visitors with a variety of traditional entertainments and activities. Food here also is different from that found elsewhere in China. Pickled red peppers are a particular local delicacy and their appetizing smell wafts from the many small family run restaurants.

Now ,pick up your bag and book a China Flight quickly ,going to have a wonderful tour in Fenghuang.

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