Further discount to book China Flights+International Hotels

On November 9, 2011, in Accomodation, China Travel Gossip, Transportation, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Any guests with China Flights Booking are qualified to book International Hotels with further 2% discount, the promotion code is: save2 This is the link where you can make hotel booking: http://www.chinatraveldepot.com/International-Hotels And this is the instruction to show the ways to apply the promotion code: The following screenshot is the page when you are […]

Any guests with China Flights Booking are qualified to book International Hotels with further 2% discount, the promotion code is: save2

This is the link where you can make hotel booking: http://www.chinatraveldepot.com/International-Hotels

And this is the instruction to show the ways to apply the promotion code:

The following screenshot is the page when you are required to input your guest information(at the bottom)

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A Simple Guide to Airport Transportation

On September 6, 2011, in Beijing, Getting Around, Transportation, Travel Info, by Jack Li

You may be wondering about the possible transport options from Beijing Capital International Airport to your Beijing hotel accommodation. Few airlines arrive at Terminal 1 which caters to mostly domestic flights, so you will most likely arrive at 2 or 3. Terminal 2 is the base for major airlines such as KLM, Delta and China […]

You may be wondering about the possible transport options from Beijing Capital International Airport to your Beijing hotel accommodation. Few airlines arrive at Terminal 1 which caters to mostly domestic flights, so you will most likely arrive at 2 or 3. Terminal 2 is the base for major airlines such as KLM, Delta and China Eastern Airlines, and Terminal 3 is the home of British Airways, Emirates, Air China and Cathay Pacific.

 

There is a free shuttle bus service which connects all the terminals. From 6am until 11pm buses depart every 10 minutes, and outside of this time there is usually a bus once every half hour. The airport is 27km from the town centre and journey times into town will vary depending on your arrival time, this can be up to one hour and may be much less if you do not face any of the notorious Beijing traffic!

 

Possible Transport Options:

  • Airport Shuttle
  • Airport Express (Subway)
  • Taxi

 

Airport Shuttle

The downtown shuttle to the center of Beijing is 16 RMB per person, per ride. There are also shuttles available that head further out, to the border cities such as Tanggu and Tianjin. Tickets are available within the terminal. For Terminal 1 you will find a ticket office at Gate 7, Terminal 2 at gates 9, 10 and 11, and at Terminal 3 next to gates 5, 7 and 11. All these ticket offices are on the first floor, Terminal 3 also has offices on the second floor.

 

There are 9 shuttle lines heading to different sections of the city:

  • Line 1: Airport to Fangzhuang (7am – 1am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 2: Airport to Xidan (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 3: Airport to Beijing Railway Station (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 4: Airport to Gongzhufen (6.50am – 12am) Return Journey (4.50am – 22pm)
  • Line 5: Airport to Zhongguancun (6.50am – 12am) Return Journey (5.30am til 9pm)
  • Line 6: Airport to Wangjing (7am – 22.30pm) Return Journey (5.30am – 8.30pm)
  • Line 7: Airport to Beijing West Railway Station (7.20am – 12am) Return (5.10am – 9pm)
  • Line 8: Airport to Shangdi (7am – 12am) Return Journey (5.30am – 6.30pm)

Follow signs at the airport to find your shuttle, buses usually leave when they are full.

 

Airport Express (Subway)

The airport express (subway line) has four stops on the route:

  • Dongzhimen, Sanyuanqiao, Terminal 3, and Terminal 2.

The journey costs 25 RMB for a one way trip and takes approximately 30 minutes. Carriages leave every 15 minutes and the service operates from 6.35am – 23.10pm from Terminal 2, and 6.20am – 22.50pm from Terminal 3.

Taxi

You can easily catch a taxi to and from the airport, and this is the best option if there are a few of you and you have lots of luggage – but it will be the most expensive. Taxi ranks are located outside the airport, Terminal 1 has stops outside gates 3 to 5, Terminal 2 outside gates 3 to 7, and Terminal 3 has signs within the building directing you to the taxi stand. The minimum charge is 10 RMB for the first 3km, after this each further km will cost 2 RMB.

 

Taxi Tips

  • Insist that the driver uses the meter, ‘Qǐng Dǎbiǎo’ means put the meter on please.
  • Have your destination written in chinese characters as many drivers do not speak English.
  • Be aware of toll charges which you cover in addition to the fare.
  • Be sure to get a licensed taxi with official certification.
  • Note down the taxi number if you have any problems.

 

In addition many of the higher end hotels provide complimentary shuttles for guests so this may also be worth looking into when you travel to Beijing.

 

Travelling around Beijing

On August 24, 2011, in Beijing, China Travel Gossip, Cool Places, Tips & Ideas, Travel Info, by Jack Li

When you arrive in Beijing after a very long Air China Flight, your Beijing Hotels may have organized transport to pick you up from the Airport, however, during your holiday you should experience more forms of transport in Beijing. It truly is a unique experience. Having travelled around Beijing for a month now, I feel […]

When you arrive in Beijing after a very long Air China Flight, your Beijing Hotels may have organized transport to pick you up from the Airport, however, during your holiday you should experience more forms of transport in Beijing. It truly is a unique experience. Having travelled around Beijing for a month now, I feel it is fair to say that I have no doubts that there are 20 million people living in this city. The main modes of transport are: bus, subway or taxi, all very different. Some have found it easy and convenient to commute in a scooter, moped or bicycle. I personally find the roads rather dangerous out here, but if you’re the adventurous type, I’d suggest renting or buying one of these vehicles during your stay in Beijing.

Lets start with the Subway. Getting aboard the subway during rush hour is the most chaotic things you will ever encounter, especially if your commute involves transferring at stations. Never underestimate how hectic it is. There are many positives however. Most of the lines (14 in total), are fully air conditioned and the Beijing subway is one of the few underground travel systems in the world where one can use their mobile phone. Thus, during non-rush hour times, it can be very comfortable.

Never forget how cheap it is to ride the subway. A single journey is 2RMB (20 pence or 30 pence). It is still a very young transport service (opened in 1969) so as it continues to develop, it will get better. The subway is probably the quickest way to get around Beijing, as it is difficult to find taxis, as a tourist. As chaotic and busy as it sounds, it is still a fun and worthwhile experience.

If you are trying to get home past 11:30pm (when the subway closes), a taxi will probably be your best bet. This is also, a very cheap and easy form of transport, maybe not during rush hour. The fare starts at 10RMB for the first 3km and goes up by 2RMB per extra km. After 10:00pm however, the base fare goes up to about 11RMB. A lot of the taxi drivers will not be able to speak English. They are nonetheless, willing to take you despite the language barrier. Thus, I would strongly recommend that you take your hotel’s business card with you at all times. Or, alternatively, kindly ask your hotel’s concierge to write down a few frequent destinations of yours during your time in Beijing, sort of like a ‘Rescue Card’ to show to taxi drivers when you get in a cab.

Lastly, the bus, the only mode of public transport I have yet to come across during my travels. A bus ticket is even cheaper with a flat rate of 1RMB for a journey. It can take you throughout the city centre and the outskirts, so if you feel like riding around all day and witnessing the hustle and bustle this city has to offer, buy a ticket and cruise away.

Beijing is a huge city and sometimes it’s worth trying all forms of transport, even a rickshaw. It adds cultural excitement to your vacation, so when you are on your china travel, I wish you the best of luck!

 

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Il Leone d’Oro(Three Chinese Nominations)

On August 22, 2011, in Accomodation, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

Il Leone d’Oro (English: The Golden Lion) is the highest prize given to a film at the Venice Film Festival. The prize was introduced in 1949 by the organizing committee and is now regarded as one of the film industry’s most distinguished prizes. In 1970, a second Golden Lion was introduced; this is an honorary […]

Il Leone d’Oro (English: The Golden Lion) is the highest prize given to a film at the Venice Film Festival. The prize was introduced in 1949 by the
organizing committee and is now regarded as one of the film industry’s most distinguished prizes. In 1970, a second Golden Lion was introduced; this is an
honorary award for people who have made an important contribution to cinema. While no Chinese film has been entered in the competition section of the Cannes International Film Festival this summer, there will be three competitors for the Golden Lion, book your China Flights through Air China and come to see where were this movies made.

Hong Kong director Johnnie To’s new work Life Without Principle has been added to the lineup of the 68th Venice International Film Festival, officials revealed recently. The heist flick tells of how a financial analyst, a thug and a cop, who share a desperate need for money, are linked when a bag of stolen money worth $5 million appears.

“This is a turbulent world, and in order to survive people have no choice but to play the game,” To says about the film in a statement released by the festival organizers. “No matter how hard you try to follow the rules, sooner or later, a part of you will be lost.” This is the third time the 56-year-old will see his work competing in the festival. However, neither of his other two films, Exiled and The Mad Detective, picked up an award.

To directs and produces the film, which stars Lau Ching Wan, Denise Ho and Terence Yin. Another veteran Hong Kong filmmaker, Ann Hui, will challenge To with A Simple Life. The tearjerker is based on a real story about the film’s producer Roger Lee and a family servant, who took care of him for more than 60 years. For Lee, the film is a tribute to his old friend, now dead. Hong Kong’s superstar Andy Lau and senior actress Deanie Ip lead the film, marking their first venture together in 23 years. Unlike To and Hui, 43-year-old Wei Te-sheng from Taiwan is a newcomer to the industry, with just one film, the 2008 romantic hit Cape No 7, under his belt.

Wei joins the competition with an ambitious work titled Seediq Bale, literally “A Real Man”. The 135-minute film depicts Taiwan aboriginal Seediq’s fight against the Japanese rulers in 1930. John Woo produces the film, starring Taiwan actress Vivian Hsu and Landy Wen.

This year’s Venice festival runs from Aug 31 to Sept 10 and includes a “surprise film”, a feature introduced by director Marco Muller, when he took over in
2004. In all, 23 films are in the run for the Golden Lion this year. Make your China Travel to see this wonderful country and his cinematrographic culture.

Chinese Economy

On August 17, 2011, in Accomodation, Beijing, Transportation, by Jack Li

The People’s Republic of China ranks since 2010 as the world’s second largest economy afterthe United States. It is one of the world’s fastest-growing major economies, with consistent growth rates of 5% – 15% over the past 30 years. China is also the largest exporter and second largest importer of goods in the world. China […]

The People’s Republic of China ranks since 2010 as the world’s second largest economy afterthe United States. It is one of the world’s fastest-growing major economies, with consistent growth rates of 5% – 15% over the past 30 years. China is also the largest exporter and second largest importer of goods in the world. China became the world’s top manufacturer in 2011, surpassing Germany. The provinces in the coastal regions of China tend to be more industrialized, while regions in the hinterland are less developed. China is the largest creditor nation in the world and owns approximately 20.8% of all foreign-owned US Treasury securities. To enrich your culture through your China Travel, you should also book your China Tours to learn more interesting things about China.

The renminbi (“people’s currency”) is the currency of China, denominated as the Yuan, subdivided into 10 Jiao or 100 Fen. The Renminbi is issued by the People’s Bank of China. The Latinised symbol is ¥. The Yuan is generally considered by outside observers to be undervalued by about 30-40%.

TOURISM

China’s tourism industry is one of the fastest-growing industries. The total revenue ofChina’s tourism industry reached USD 67.3 billion in 2002, accounting for 5.44% of the GDP. Tourism has become the main source of tax revenue and the key industry for economic development.

The total number of inbound tourists was 91.66 million in 2003, and that of tourists staying
overnight was 32.7 million, about 10 times of the number in 1980. International tourism receipts were USD 17.4 billion in 2003. China’s ranking for both the overnight tourist arrivals and tourism receipts were among the world’s top five in 2003. However, there is unlikely to be a big increase in the inbound tourism market.

EXTERNAL TRADE

Since economic reforms began in the late 1970s, China sought to decentralize its foreign trade
system to integrate itself into the international trading system. On November 1991, China joined the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) group, which promotes free trade and cooperation in the economic, trade, investment, and technology spheres. China served as APEC chair in 2001, and Shanghai hosted the annual APEC leaders meeting in October of that year. China’s global trade
totaled $324 billion in 1997 and $151 billion in the first half of 1998; the trade surplus stood at $40.0 billion. China’s primary trading partners were Japan, Taiwan, the U.S., South Korea, Hong Kong, Germany, Singapore, Russia, and the Netherlands. China had a trade surplus with the U.S. of $49.7 billion in 1997 and $54.6 billion in 1998. Major imports were power generating equipment, aircraft and parts, computers and industrial machinery, raw materials, and chemical and agricultural products.

BANKING SECTOR

China’s banking system is highly regulated with six major banks, each having specific tasks andduties. The People’s Bank of China is the largest bank in China and acts as the Treasury. It also issues currency, monitors money supply, regulates monetary organizations and formulates monetary policy for the State Council. The Bank of China manages foreign exchange and manages foreign exchange reserves. The China Development Bank distributes foreign capital from a variety of sources, and the China International Trust and Investment Corporation (CITIC) was previously a
financial organization that smoothed the inflow of foreign funds, but is now a full bank, allowing to compete for foreign investment funds with the Bank of China. The China Construction Bank lends funds for capital construction projects from the state budget, and finally the Agricultural Bank of China functions as a lending and deposit taking institution for the agricultural sector. Travel to Beijing and get to know how is this country growing so fast economically.

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Fun and Interesting things about China

On August 11, 2011, in Accomodation, Festivals, Tours, by Jack Li

If you are going to make your China Travel you should probably read  some of this interesting facts in China.  To enrich your culture if you come here, China Tours are really helpful to get to know China. Here we have interesting facts about a facinating country: China. When a Chinese child loses a baby tooth, […]

If you are going to make your China Travel you should probably read  some of this interesting facts in China.  To enrich your culture if you come here, China Tours are really helpful to get to know China. Here we have interesting facts about a facinating country: China.

  1. When a Chinese child loses a baby tooth, it doesn’t get tucked under the pillow for the tooth fairy. If the child loses an upper tooth, the child’s parents plant the tooth in the ground, so the new tooth will grow in straight and healthy. Parents toss a lost bottom tooth up to the rooftops, so that the new tooth will grow upwards , too.
  2. It is considered good luck for the gate to a house to face south.
  3. Long ago, silk making was a closely guarded secret. Anyone who gave the secret away could be killed.
  4. Red is considered a lucky color in China. At one time wedding dresses were red. New Year’s banners, clothing, and lucky money envelopes are still red.
  5. Fourth graders are expected to know 2,000 of the over 40,000 written Chinese characters. By the time they leave college, they will know 4,000 or 5,000 characters. Each character is learned by looking at it and memorizing it.
  6. Despite its size, all of China is in one time zone.
  7. The number one hobby in China is stamp collecting.
  8. Giant Pandas , date back two to three million years. The early Chinese emperors kept pandas to ward off evil spirits and natural disasters. Pandas also were considered symbols of might and bravery.
  9. Though Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) is credited with designing the first parachute, Chinese alchemists successfully used man-carrying tethered kites by the fourth century A.D. Parachutes were not used safely and effectively in Europe until the late 1700s.
  10. On September 27, 2008, Zhai Zhigang made the first spacewalk by a Chinese astronaut
  11. According to popular legend, tea was discovered by the Chinese emperor Shennong in 2737 B.C. when a tea leaf fell into his boiling water. The Chinese consider tea to be a necessity of life.
  12. The Chinese have made silk since at least 3,000 B.C. The Romans knew China as “Serica,” which means “Land of Silk.” The Chinese fiercely guarded the secrets of silk making, and anyone caught smuggling silkworm eggs or cocoons outside of China was put to death.
  13. According to a Chinese legend, silk was discovered in 3000 B.C. by Lady Xi Ling Sui, wife of the Emperor Huang Di. When a silk worm cocoon accidentally dropped into her hot tea, fine threads from the cocoon unraveled in the hot water and silk was born
  14. It was customary for wealthy men and women in the late empire to grow the nails of their little fingers extremely long as a sign of their rank. They often wore decorative gold and silver nail guards to protect their nails.
  15. The 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing were the most expensive games in history. While the 2004 Athens Games were estimated to cost around $15 billion, the Beijing Games were estimated to cost a whopping $40 billion.
  16. Ice Cream was invented in China around 2000 B.C when the Chinese packed a soft milk and rice mixture with the snow.

Book your China Hotels and experience the variety that China had to offer.

 

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Chinese Important Inventions

On August 8, 2011, in Accomodation, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

Travel to Beijing and find out where this inventions where originated, find cheap flights at Beijing Flights Parachute: The invention of the parachute is used widely today, both for recreational, and government uses. When important and sensitive satellites are entering the orbit, they are in a freefall, but once they get to a certain point […]

Travel to Beijing and find out where this inventions where originated, find cheap flights at Beijing Flights

Parachute:

The invention of the parachute is used widely today, both for recreational, and
government uses. When important and sensitive satellites are entering the
orbit, they are in a freefall, but once they get to a certain point they deploy a sturdy parachute to allow them to drift to the ground harmlessly. First documentation of the parachute was in 90 BC, but it is assumed to be around in second century BC.

Row crops:

Crops were first planted in rows around sixth century BC, which allows them to grow faster and larger. In addition, the wind will hit the perfectly straight rows and roll gently through.

Deep drilling for gas:

A technique developed in 100 BC is still used today, known as deep drilling for gas. The devices that were used were remarkably large  for the time. This technique has given many Americans jobs in the past and present, and is responsible for a considerable amount of America’s income.

Paper currency:

Paper currency was first introduced by the Chinese, and is now used widely in most countries. The earliest documentation of this invention is in the 800 BC.

Gun powder:

Gun powder wasn’t designed first for war uses, but as elixir for immortality.
Unfortunately, the only thing that gun powder did was explode. The invention of this made wars less gruesome and painful. Instead of dying slowly by a fatal
sword wound, a shot takes toll immediately. Gun powder’s date is unknown, but it is assumed that it was invented around the same time as fireworks.

Flame thrower:

What pyromaniac nut invented this tool or weapon?  Invented in the tenth century BC, the flame thrower was a great invention that has a variation used widely today. A torch or welder (following the same basic principles of a flame thrower) is used to weld metals together, and is very important in building large sturdy structures.

Fireworks:
Fireworks were invented by the Chinese as entertainment, but were later used to scare off enemies in times of war. Today, we use fireworks to celebrate our independence. It is cool that this seventeenth century BC technique is still practiced and enjoyed today.

Rudder:

The rudder helps with turning a boat or in recent years, a plane. Before the invention of the rudder, boats had to rely on oars to turn, which required a lot of unnecessary time and energy. Now, planes (which cannot be steered by oar) are possible, and are used widely for both recreational and work. It is unknown when the rudder was invented.

The wheelbarrow:

When working, you could carry 200 kg  of weight in a wheelbarrow, while you could only carry half of that. The Chinese’s building process was dramatically sped up because of this useful invention. The wheelbarrow emerged in first century BC.

Compass:

The compass is one of the most useful inventions by the Chinese, used widely in planes, boats, and in the wilderness to find direction. Many times when you lose your bearings, just consult the compass and you’re on your way. Invention date is unknown.

You have to try the amazing variety of China Hotels and explore what China have to offer.

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World’s Longest Bridge

On July 29, 2011, in Modern Architecture, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

The world’s longest cross sea bridge has been revealed by China, proving once again how technology and economics are the strongest points of its economy. Come to China to visit one of the most amazing architectural designs in the world, just check out the following links: Air China, China Travel. Jiaozhou Bay Bridge, is a […]

The world’s longest cross sea bridge has been revealed by China, proving
once again how technology and economics are the strongest points of its economy. Come to China to visit one of the most amazing architectural designs in the world, just check out the following links: Air China, China Travel.

Jiaozhou Bay Bridge, is a roadway bridge in eastern China’s Shadong province. It transects Jiaozhou Bay, connecting Huangdao District, the city of Qingdao and Hongdao Island (the bridge is “T” shaped with 3 entry/exit points). Opened on 30 June 2011, it reduces the road distance between Qingdao and Huangdao. The bridge, opened at the same time as the nearby Qing-Huang Tunnel, both part of the Jiaozhou Bay Connection Project.

Jiaozhou Bay Bridge is 42.5 kilometres (26.4 miles) long, making it
according to Guinness World Records the world’s longest bridge over water
as of July 2011. China is already home to seven of the world’s 10 longest bridges, including the world’s lengthiest, the 102 mile Danyang-Kunshan rail bridge, which runs over land and water near Shanghai. And with Beijing pumping billions into boosting China’s infrastructure, the Qingdao Haiwan Bridge will not be the world’s longest sea bridge for very long as coming 2016, it is due to be surpassed by an even longer structure, linking Hong Kong with the Guangdong province. The longest bridge over water “continuous length” is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the difference being the latter runs continuously over water while Jiaozhou Bay Bridge has parts over land. It is estimated Jiaozhou Bay Bridge is over water for 25.5 kilometres (15.8 mi).

The bridge took four years to build, and employed at least 10,000 people. 450,000 tons of steel and 2.3 million cubic meters of concrete were used in the
construction of the bridge, which was designed by the Shandong Gaosu Group. It is designed to beable to withstand severe earthquakes, typhoons, and collisions with ships. The bridge is supported by more than 5,000 pillars, 35 meters (115 feet) wide, carrying six lanes and two shoulders, and cost more than 10 billion Yuan (US$1.5 billion).

On the same day the bridge opened, the Qing-Huang Tunnel opened. It also transects Jiaozhou Bay, also connecting Huangdao District and the city of Qingdao, between the narrow mouth of the bay which is 6.17 kilometers (3.83 mi) wide.The tunnel is 9.47 kilometers (5.88 mi) long.

Concerns regarding the bridge’s safety were raised when Chinese media
reported that the bridge was opened with faulty elements, such as “incomplete crash-barriers, missing lighting and loose nuts on guard-rails”, with workers stating that “it would take two months before finishing all of the projects related to the bridge”. Shao Xinpeng, the bridge’s chief engineer, claimed that in spite of the safety report the bridge was safe and ready for traffic, adding that the problems highlighted in the reports were not major.

For more additional information check our China Tours experience!

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The Turpan Karez System

On July 27, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

TheTurpan water system or Turfan water system (locally called karez water system) in Turpan, located in the Turpan Depression, Xinjiang, China, is a system adapted by the Turpan people. The Chinese claim the karez system as one of the three greatest water projects of China, linking it with the Dujiangyan Irrigation System and the Grand […]

TheTurpan water system or Turfan water system (locally called karez water system)
in Turpan, located in the Turpan Depression, Xinjiang, China, is a system adapted by the Turpan people. The Chinese claim the karez system as one of the three greatest water
projects of China, linking it with the Dujiangyan Irrigation System and the Grand Canal.
The karezes are a Persian invention, the word karez means “well” in the local Uyghur language.Turpan has the Turpan Water Museum ( Protected Area of the People’s Republic of China) dedicated to demonstrating its karez water system, as well as exhibiting other historical artifacts. You should come to this amazing place, so book your flight and tour know; check out the following links: Air China, China Tours.

Turpan’s well system was crucial in Turpan’s development as an important oasis stopover on the ancient Silk Road skirting the barren and hostile Taklamakan Desert. Turpan owes its prosperity to the water provided by its karez well system.

Turpan’s karez water system ismade up of a horizontal series of vertically dug wells that are  linked by underground water canals to collect water from the watershed from the base of the Tian Shan Mountains and the nearby Flaming Mountains. The canals channel the water to the surface, taking advantage of the current provided by the gravity of the downward slope of the Turpan Depression. The canals are mostly underground to reduce water evaporation.

In Xinjiang, the greatest number of karez wells are in the Turpan Depression, where today there remain over 1100 karez wells and channels having a total length of over 5,000
kilometres (3,100 mi). The local geography makes karez wells practical for agricultural irrigation and other uses. Turpan is located in the second deepest geographical depression
in the world, with over 4,000 km2  of land below sea level and with soil that forms a
sturdy basin. Water naturally flows down from the nearby mountains during the rainy season in an underground current to the low depression basin under the desert. The Turpan summer is very hot and dry with periods of wind and blowing sand. The water
from the underground channels provides a stable water source year round, independent of season.

IMPORTANCE

Ample water was crucial to Turpan, so that the oasis city could service the many caravans on the Silk Route resting there near a route skirting the Taklamakan Desert. The caravans included merchant traders and missionaries with their armed escorts, animals including camels, sometimes numbering into the thousands, along with camel drivers, agents and other personnel, all of whom might stay for a week or more. The caravans needed pastures for their animals, resting facilities, trading bazaars for conducting business, and replenishment of food and water. Check out all your possibilities to come to China in the following link: China Airlines

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The Mogao Caves

On July 22, 2011, in Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

The Mogao Caves, or Mogao Grottoes (also known as the Caves of the Thousand Buddhas and Dunhuang Caves) form a system of 492 temples 25 km at the southeast of the center of Dunhuang, an oasis strategically located at a religious and cultural crossroads on the Silk Road, in Gansu province, China. Dunhuang is about […]

The Mogao Caves, or Mogao Grottoes (also known as the Caves of the Thousand Buddhas and Dunhuang Caves) form a system of 492 temples 25 km at the southeast of the center of Dunhuang, an oasis strategically located at a religious and cultural crossroads on the Silk Road, in Gansu province, China. Dunhuang is about 1140 km from Lanzhou, the biggest city in Gansu. It takes about 14 hours by train from Lanzhou to Dunhuang. The caves contain some of the finest examples of Buddhist art spanning a period of 1,000 years. The first caves were dug out 366 AD as places of Buddhist meditation and worship. The Mogao Caves are the best known of the Chinese Buddhist grottoes and, along with Longmen Grottoes and Yungang Grottoes, are one of the three famous ancient Buddhist sculptural sites of China. For more information about flight and tour in China check out the following links: China Flights and China Tours

In the early 1900s, a Chinese Taoist named Wang Yuanlu appointed himself guardian of some of these temples. Wang discovered a walled up area behind one side of a corridor leading to a main cave. Behind the wall was a small cave stuffed with an enormous hoard of manuscripts dating from 406 to 1002 AD. He found a lot of manuscripts about original commentaries,apocryphal works, workbooks, books of prayers, Confucian works, Taoist works, Nestorian Christian works, works from the Chinese government, administrative documents, anthologies, glossaries, dictionaries, and calligraphic exercises. These manuscripts survived only because they formed a type of palimpsest in which the Buddhist texts (the target of the preservation effort) were written on the opposite side of the paper. The remaining Chinese manuscripts were sent to Beijing at the order of the Chinese government. Wang embarked on an ambitious refurbishment of the temples.

Besides damage done by previous European explorers, White Russian Bandits escaping from the Russian Civil War were responsible for vandalizing much the Buddhist art at the Mogao Grottoes. They had caused trouble in Xinjiang, but were defeated when they tried to attack Qitai

. The Governor of Xinjiang, Yang Zengxin, arranged for them to be transported to Dunhuang at the Mogao Grottoes, after talks with Governor Lu Hongtao of Gansu. The White Russian bandits wrote profanities onto Buddhist statues, destroying and ravaging paintings, gouging eyes off and amputating the limbs of the statues, in addition to committing arson. At present, the damage remains.

Although there were

originally about 1000 caves, only thirty main caves are open to the public. The rest are either not in good condition, or not of public interests. The caves are all labeled with numbers above the doors. Visitors will need to take flashlights as the caves are not lit inside to preserve the murals.

The thirty opened caves can be divided into 4 major groups according to the time they were constructed. They are Northern Wei Caves (386-581), Sui Caves (581-618), Tang Caves (618-906), Later Caves (906-c.1360).

Northern Wei Caves (386-581)

India-style structure, small in size with a large column in the center. Cave 101, 120N, 135, 257, 428.

Sui Caves (5

81-618)

Extensive use

of gold and silver colors; bold Wei brushwork with intricate, flowing lines. Cave 150, 427.

Tang Caves (618-906)

With square fl

oors, tapering roofs and worship niches against the back wall. Cave 1, 51E, 70, 96, 139A, 148.

Later Caves (906-c.1360)

With central altars. Mural subjects often include Tibetan-style figures and mandalas. Cave 465.

Buy your flight ticket through Air China and come to see this beautiful sites!

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