Adventure Travel

Century Towers, Beijing

On August 9, 2011, in Accomodation, Beijing, Restaurants & Food, by Jack Li

Travel to Beijing and there are many hotels to choose from. Picking the correct one can be difficult. With there being a lot of choice it is up to you to pick the one that is right for you. Beijing Hotels offers a wide range of choices. Opened in 2000 Century Towers is a foreign-guest […]

Travel to Beijing and there are many hotels to choose from. Picking the correct one can be difficult. With there being a lot of choice it is up to you to pick the one that is right for you. Beijing Hotels offers a wide range of choices.

Opened in 2000 Century Towers is a foreign-guest orientated hotel run by the China World Trade Centre Ltd. It is located in the Chaoyang District on Guangqumenwai Avenue west of the Shuangjing Bridge. It is also in close proximity to the Central Business District area, and has excellent transportation links to buses, taxis, and the subway. A 20-minute drive from the centre of the city and 40-minute drive from the airport makes Century Towers a convenient place to live.

The hotel provides a quite and comfortable place to live whilst providing a simple, clean modern living environment. Each room is adequately furnished providing you with all the required modern facilities. To further better your experience whilst living at Century Towers there is an array of extra facilities such as gym, aerobics room, sauna, card room, billiards room and massage parlour.

Century Towers hotel has 360 1-3 bedroom apartments and 60 suites. Making it suitable for people travelling in groups or on their own.  Within the rooms all the essential amenities such as high speed Internet, air conditioning, private bathrooms, cable/satellite TV, and fridges are provided.

The staff of the hotel are very friendly and helpful. Communication is made easy as they all speak adequate amounts of English. There is also a 24/7 security service that ensures that you will remain safe at all times during your stay at Century Towers.

With prices ranging between 400-600RMB ($60-90), depending on the number of living occupants, it makes Century Towers an affordable and convenient place to stay during your time in Beijing.

The location of Century towers makes exploring the exciting city of Beijing easier than ever. Walking in close proximity of the hotel there are major shopping malls and western food outlets that provide all the essential western needs. If you are looking for a real cultural experience during your visit to China there is also a large variety of local restaurants, bars, and shops to explore and experience.

For those wishing to adventure out further and explore the ins and outs of Beijing the subway provides a quick, easy, and comfortable mode of transport. The nearest subway station is Shuanjing, which is less than a two-minute walk to the west of Century Towers.

With Century Towers being in an ideal location for transport, sight-seeing and many other activities the welcoming downstairs lobby is an excellent meeting point for friends who may be living nearby. It’s modern and stylish decor is inviting and allows you to relax and unwind.

So don’t hesitate to book your Beijing Flights and experience what China has to offer.

 

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The Turpan Karez System

On July 27, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

TheTurpan water system or Turfan water system (locally called karez water system) in Turpan, located in the Turpan Depression, Xinjiang, China, is a system adapted by the Turpan people. The Chinese claim the karez system as one of the three greatest water projects of China, linking it with the Dujiangyan Irrigation System and the Grand […]

TheTurpan water system or Turfan water system (locally called karez water system)
in Turpan, located in the Turpan Depression, Xinjiang, China, is a system adapted by the Turpan people. The Chinese claim the karez system as one of the three greatest water
projects of China, linking it with the Dujiangyan Irrigation System and the Grand Canal.
The karezes are a Persian invention, the word karez means “well” in the local Uyghur language.Turpan has the Turpan Water Museum ( Protected Area of the People’s Republic of China) dedicated to demonstrating its karez water system, as well as exhibiting other historical artifacts. You should come to this amazing place, so book your flight and tour know; check out the following links: Air China, China Tours.

Turpan’s well system was crucial in Turpan’s development as an important oasis stopover on the ancient Silk Road skirting the barren and hostile Taklamakan Desert. Turpan owes its prosperity to the water provided by its karez well system.

Turpan’s karez water system ismade up of a horizontal series of vertically dug wells that are  linked by underground water canals to collect water from the watershed from the base of the Tian Shan Mountains and the nearby Flaming Mountains. The canals channel the water to the surface, taking advantage of the current provided by the gravity of the downward slope of the Turpan Depression. The canals are mostly underground to reduce water evaporation.

In Xinjiang, the greatest number of karez wells are in the Turpan Depression, where today there remain over 1100 karez wells and channels having a total length of over 5,000
kilometres (3,100 mi). The local geography makes karez wells practical for agricultural irrigation and other uses. Turpan is located in the second deepest geographical depression
in the world, with over 4,000 km2  of land below sea level and with soil that forms a
sturdy basin. Water naturally flows down from the nearby mountains during the rainy season in an underground current to the low depression basin under the desert. The Turpan summer is very hot and dry with periods of wind and blowing sand. The water
from the underground channels provides a stable water source year round, independent of season.

IMPORTANCE

Ample water was crucial to Turpan, so that the oasis city could service the many caravans on the Silk Route resting there near a route skirting the Taklamakan Desert. The caravans included merchant traders and missionaries with their armed escorts, animals including camels, sometimes numbering into the thousands, along with camel drivers, agents and other personnel, all of whom might stay for a week or more. The caravans needed pastures for their animals, resting facilities, trading bazaars for conducting business, and replenishment of food and water. Check out all your possibilities to come to China in the following link: China Airlines

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The Mogao Caves

On July 22, 2011, in Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

The Mogao Caves, or Mogao Grottoes (also known as the Caves of the Thousand Buddhas and Dunhuang Caves) form a system of 492 temples 25 km at the southeast of the center of Dunhuang, an oasis strategically located at a religious and cultural crossroads on the Silk Road, in Gansu province, China. Dunhuang is about […]

The Mogao Caves, or Mogao Grottoes (also known as the Caves of the Thousand Buddhas and Dunhuang Caves) form a system of 492 temples 25 km at the southeast of the center of Dunhuang, an oasis strategically located at a religious and cultural crossroads on the Silk Road, in Gansu province, China. Dunhuang is about 1140 km from Lanzhou, the biggest city in Gansu. It takes about 14 hours by train from Lanzhou to Dunhuang. The caves contain some of the finest examples of Buddhist art spanning a period of 1,000 years. The first caves were dug out 366 AD as places of Buddhist meditation and worship. The Mogao Caves are the best known of the Chinese Buddhist grottoes and, along with Longmen Grottoes and Yungang Grottoes, are one of the three famous ancient Buddhist sculptural sites of China. For more information about flight and tour in China check out the following links: China Flights and China Tours

In the early 1900s, a Chinese Taoist named Wang Yuanlu appointed himself guardian of some of these temples. Wang discovered a walled up area behind one side of a corridor leading to a main cave. Behind the wall was a small cave stuffed with an enormous hoard of manuscripts dating from 406 to 1002 AD. He found a lot of manuscripts about original commentaries,apocryphal works, workbooks, books of prayers, Confucian works, Taoist works, Nestorian Christian works, works from the Chinese government, administrative documents, anthologies, glossaries, dictionaries, and calligraphic exercises. These manuscripts survived only because they formed a type of palimpsest in which the Buddhist texts (the target of the preservation effort) were written on the opposite side of the paper. The remaining Chinese manuscripts were sent to Beijing at the order of the Chinese government. Wang embarked on an ambitious refurbishment of the temples.

Besides damage done by previous European explorers, White Russian Bandits escaping from the Russian Civil War were responsible for vandalizing much the Buddhist art at the Mogao Grottoes. They had caused trouble in Xinjiang, but were defeated when they tried to attack Qitai

. The Governor of Xinjiang, Yang Zengxin, arranged for them to be transported to Dunhuang at the Mogao Grottoes, after talks with Governor Lu Hongtao of Gansu. The White Russian bandits wrote profanities onto Buddhist statues, destroying and ravaging paintings, gouging eyes off and amputating the limbs of the statues, in addition to committing arson. At present, the damage remains.

Although there were

originally about 1000 caves, only thirty main caves are open to the public. The rest are either not in good condition, or not of public interests. The caves are all labeled with numbers above the doors. Visitors will need to take flashlights as the caves are not lit inside to preserve the murals.

The thirty opened caves can be divided into 4 major groups according to the time they were constructed. They are Northern Wei Caves (386-581), Sui Caves (581-618), Tang Caves (618-906), Later Caves (906-c.1360).

Northern Wei Caves (386-581)

India-style structure, small in size with a large column in the center. Cave 101, 120N, 135, 257, 428.

Sui Caves (5

81-618)

Extensive use

of gold and silver colors; bold Wei brushwork with intricate, flowing lines. Cave 150, 427.

Tang Caves (618-906)

With square fl

oors, tapering roofs and worship niches against the back wall. Cave 1, 51E, 70, 96, 139A, 148.

Later Caves (906-c.1360)

With central altars. Mural subjects often include Tibetan-style figures and mandalas. Cave 465.

Buy your flight ticket through Air China and come to see this beautiful sites!

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Interesting Facts about The Great Wall

On July 21, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Cultural Experience, Great Wall, by Jack Li

The Great Wall of China is a series of stone and earthen fortifications in northern China, built originally to protect the northern borders of the Chinese Empire against intrusions by various nomadic groups. Several walls have been built since the 5th century BC that are referred to collectively as the Great Wall, which has been rebuilt and maintained from the 5th […]

The Great Wall of China is a series of stone and earthen fortifications in northern China, built originally to protect the northern borders of the Chinese Empire against intrusions by various nomadic groups. Several walls have been built since the 5th century BC that are referred to collectively as the Great Wall, which has been rebuilt and maintained from the 5th century BC through the 16th century. One of the most famous is the wall built between 220–206 BC by the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang. Little of that wall remains; the majority of the existing wall was built during the Ming Dynasty.To visit this beautiful place check out the following links for more information: China Tours and Air China Here you have some interesting facts about this incredible site:

1.   In 1987, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) placed the Great Wall on its list of the world’s great national and historical sites.

2.   That the Great Wall is a single, continuous wall built all at once is a myth. In reality, the wall is a discontinuous network of wall segments built by various dynasties to protect China’s northern boundary.

3.   During its construction, the Great Wall was called “the longest cemetery on earth” because so many people died building it. Reportedly, it cost the lives of more than one million people.

4.   The Great Wall of China is the longest man-made structure in the world.

5.   The most visited section of the Great Wall is in Badaling, close to Beijing, which was built during the Ming Dynasty. It was the first section of the wall to open to tourists in 1957. It is where Nixon visited and was the finish site of a cycling course in the 2008 Summer Olympics.

6.   The length of all Chinese defense walls built over the last 2,000 years is approximately 50,000 km. Earth’s circumference is  40,000 km.

7.    The earliest extensive walls were built by Qin Shi Huang (260-210 B.C.) of the Qin dynasty, who first unified China and is most famous for the standing terra cotta army left to guard his tomb. It is from the Qin (pronounced “chin”) dynasty which the modern word “China” is derived.

8.   Because the Great Wall was discontinuous, Mongol invaders led by Genghis Khan had no problem going around the wall and they subsequently conquered most of northern China between A.D. 1211 and 1223. They ruled all of China until 1368 when the Ming defeated the Mongols.

9.   Contrary to common belief, the Great Wall of China cannot be seen from the moon without aid. This pervasive myth seems to have started in 1893 in the American-published magazine The Century.

10.  It is common to hear that the mortar used to bind the stones was made from human bones or that men are buried within the Great Wall to make it stronger. However, the mortar was actually made from rice flour and no bones, human or otherwise, have ever been found in any of the Great Wall’s walls.

11.  Voltaire (1694-1778) discussed the Great Wall several times, but he remained undecided what the real point was. In one piece, he though the Egyptian pyramids were “childish” compared to the Wall, which was a “great work.” In another place, he calls the Wall a “monument to fear.”

12.  The last battle fought at the Great Wall was in 1938 during the Sino-Japanese War, which was between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan. Bullet marks can still be seen in the Wall at Gubeikou.

13.  In 2004, there were over 41.8 million foreign visitors to the Great Wall of China.

For more information check out your travel opportunities on the following link… China Flights

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Chinese Weather

On July 19, 2011, in Adventure Trip, by Jack Li

Introduction to China weather In China, a vast land spanning many degrees of latitude with complicated terrain, climate varies radically. China has a variety of temperature and rainfall zones, including continental monsoon areas. In winter most areas become cold and dry, in summer hot and humid. We can help you to find your best flight […]

Introduction to China weather

In China, a vast land spanning many degrees of latitude with complicated terrain, climate varies radically. China has a variety of temperature and rainfall zones, including continental monsoon areas. In winter most areas become cold and dry, in summer hot and humid. We can help you to find your best flight tickets and China tours, just click into the following links.. China Flights and China Tours

Five Temperature Zones

Temperatures vary a great deal. Influenced by latitude and monsoon activities, in winter, an isotherm of zero degrees goes from the Huaihe River-Qinling Mountain-southeast to Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Northern areas of the isotherm have temperatures below zero degrees and south of it, above zero. Mohe in Heilongjiang can hit an average of 30 degrees centigrade below zero, while the temperature of Sanya in Hainan Province is above 20 degrees. In summer, most of areas are above 20 degrees centigrade despite the high Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and other mountains such as Tianshan. Among these hot places, Turpan Basin in Xinjiang is the center for intense heat at 32 centigrade on average.

Cold-Temperate Zone: north part of Heilongjiang Province and Inner Mongolia (Representative city: Harbin)

 Mid-Temperate Zone: Jilin, northern Xinjiang, and most of Heilongjiang, Liaoning, and Inner  Mongolia (Representative cities: Beijing, Shenyang, Dalian, Urumqi, Hohhot, Dunhuang, Lanzhou) 

Warm-Temperate Zone: area of the middle and lower reaches of the Yellow River, Shandong, Shanxi, Shaanxi, and Hebei Province (Representative cities: Xian, Taiyuan, Luoyang, Jinan, Qingdao, Zhengzhou)
 

Subtropical Zone: South of isotherm of Qinling Mountain-Huaihe River, east of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (Representative cities: Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Macau, Guilin, Hangzhou, Suzhou, Kunming, Dali, Lijiang, Chengdu)
 

Tropical Zone: Hainan province, southern Taiwan, Guangdong, and Yunnan Province (Representative cities: Haikou, Sanya)

 Plateau Climate Zone: Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (Representative city: Lhasa)

Precipitation

Precipitation in China is basically regular each year.  The distribution shows that the rainfall is increasing from southeast to northwest, because the eastern seashores are influenced more than inland areas by the summer monsoon. In the place with the most rainfall, Huoshaoliao in Taipei, the average annual precipitation can reach over 6,000mm. The rainy seasons are mainly May to September. In some areas, especially in the dry northwest, changes in precipitation every year are greater than in the coastal area. Based on precipitation, the area divides into four parts: wet area, semi-wet area, semi-dry area and dry area. The Turpan depression, in northwest China has the lowest point of the country, at 154 m below sea level. This is also the second lowest point on land in the world, after the Dead Sea in Israel.

Monsoon
In summer, a southeast monsoon from the western Pacific Ocean and a southwest monsoon from the equatorial Indian Ocean blow onto the Chinese mainland. These monsoons are the main cause of rainfall. Starting in April and May, the summer rainy season monsoons hit the southern provinces of Guangdong, Guangxi, and Hainan. In June, the rains blow northward, and South China gets more rainfall with the poetic name, plum-rain weather, since this is the moment when plums mellow. North China greets its rainy season in July and August, says farewell in September; gradually in October the summer monsoons retreat from Chinese land. Eastern China experiences many climate changes, while the northwest area is a non-monsoon region. For additional information check out the following link.. China Travel

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Lhasa, Tibet experience

On July 8, 2011, in Cultural Experience, Lhasa, More Cities, Tibet, by Jack Li

Lhasa, literally meaning “Holy-Land”, is the heart and soul of Tibet, has history of more than 1,300 years. It was an important center of administrative power in the 7th century AD, when Songtsen Gampo, a local ruler in the Yarlung Valley, continued the task of unifying Tibet.  Songtsen Gampo moved his capital to Lhasa and […]

Lhasa, literally meaning “Holy-Land”, is the heart and soul of Tibet, has history of more than 1,300 years.

It was an important center of administrative power in the 7th century AD, when Songtsen Gampo, a local ruler in the Yarlung Valley, continued the task of unifying Tibet.  Songtsen Gampo moved his capital to Lhasa and built a palace on the site that is now occupied by the Potala. You will found a lot of interesting information about this spiritual town.  It is a beautiful place to go and we will help you to make your trip amusing and cheap, just check the following links.. Tibet Tours and Travel to Tibet

The wonderful part of this trip is to see the different faces of the Himalaya Range: on the north side, the ever-stretching snow mountains and atrocious weather make it an inhospitable land. While the south side of the Himalaya embraces luxurious shades of green, with waterfalls and cascades flushing almost everywhere. You can do nothing but marvel at this Mother Nature’s masterpiece.

There are lots of interesting places for you to visit in Tibet, but in my opinion there are four sites that you cannot miss…

The Potala Palace: the symbol of Lhasa, perched upon Marpo Ri Hill, 130 meters above the Lhasa Valley, it is the greatest monumental structure in Tibet and one of the most famous architectural works of the world. The construction of it started in 641 AD and was rebuilt by the Fifth Dalai Lama in three years, while the Thirteenth Dalai Lama extended and repaired it into what it is now. As the religious and political centre of old Tibet and the winter residence of Dalai Lamas, the palace witnessed the life of the Dalai Lamas and the important political and religious activities in the past centuries.

Potala Palace also houses great amounts of rare cultural relics including the gold hand-written Buddhist scriptures, valuable gifts from the Chinese emperors and a lot of priceless antiques. By the way if you have not heard it yet, the Dalai Lama is the traditional governmental ruler and highest priest of Tibet and Mongolia.

The Barkhor Street:

it is a circular street around the Jokhang Temple in the centre of the old section of Lhasa, it is the oldest street in a very traditional style in Tibet, where you can enjoy bargaining with the local Tibetan vendors for the handicrafts which are rare to be seen elsewhere in the world.

The Yaluzangbu River: with 2,051 km long, the Yaluzangbu River turns and twists like a silver dragon from the west to the east into the valleys of South Tibet. It runs through Muotuo County. After a 90-degree turn, it empties into the Indian Ocean.

Tashilumpo Monastery: built in 1447 AD, the oldest and largest Gelugpa monastery in Tibet, the seat of Banchen Lama, painted in red and white, the buildings in the monastery stand closely together in terraced rows, offering a grand and majestic view. The most amazing image in this monastery is the statue of giant Maitreya (Future Buddha)–the largest one in the world, erected by the 9th Panchen Lama in 1914; it stands 26 meters in height and 275 kg in weight with solid gold, great quantity of precious things such as pearls, turquoises, corals and ambers.

Come to Tibet as soon as possible and you will have a wonderful time just check our plane tickets Air china and take your family and yourself to this colourful place!!

Hutongs- A world away from bustling Beijing

On July 6, 2011, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Festivals, by Jack Li

  When you often think of Beijing you think of the numerous historical sites and the thriving business district. Beijingers and tourists a like rush around the city, but rarely slow down to notice the hidden gem of the city; The Hutongs. These are the old neighbourhoods where locals have lived for centuries. If you […]

 

When you often think of Beijing you think of the numerous historical sites and the thriving business district. Beijingers and tourists a like rush around the city, but rarely slow down to notice the hidden gem of the city; The Hutongs. These are the old neighbourhoods where locals have lived for centuries. If you want to experience the traditional Chinese culture book a Beijing flight with Air China now!

Located only a few kilometres away from Tiananmen Square, in the heart of Beijing stands the old alleyways of the Hutongs. The word ‘hutong’ was originally thought to have meant ‘water well’ in Mongolian and they were first developed in the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368 AD.) The definition of a Hutong is a street that is 9 meters wide or less. Originally there were 29 Hutongs in Beijing, which were home to court officials and noblemen. However now traditional Chinese families live there, just like the generations before them. It is common to find courtyards made up of many one-level family units that reveal an authentic way of life. The Hutongs are renowned for their big community spirit and relaxed atmosphere. Many elderly residents sit in the alleyways chatting in Mandarin or playing Chinese chess, while the children play outside their homes. The scene is so simple yet admirable.

Even though the development of the city has threatened the existence of the Hutongs online casino on many occasions, most areas have remained unchanged for 700 years. However in the 1980s a large section of a Hutong was bulldozed down to allow for high-rise apartments to be built. Fortunately since then the government has recognised that the Hutongs are part of Beijing’s cultural heritage and therefore aim to preserve the area.

The best way to see the Hutongs is to walk around them and get lost in their historic ambience. While you are visiting the Hutongs you must take a rickshaw ride down the winding alleyways to see the homes of the real Chinese people. When exploring the Hutongs you must realise that they are not just small quaint buildings; they represent the traditional Chinese way of life.

The time to visit the Hutongs is during festivals or holidays as they are a sea of red, covered with lanterns and paper cut outs. This tradition has been followed for centuries and highlights the community spirit.

 

If you really want to learn about the Chinese culture Travel to Beijing and visit the Hutongs.

Urumqi, “in the Hearth of the Silk Road”

On June 21, 2011, in Adventure Trip, More Cities, Xinjiang, by Jack Li

The city of Urumqi is the capital of the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, under the administration of People’s Republic of China, counting 2.5 million habitants. Urumqi has the characteristic to be the most inland city in the world, being the furthest location on earth from any ocean. The population is a mix of two major […]

The city of Urumqi is the capital of the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, under the administration of People’s Republic of China, counting 2.5 million habitants.

Urumqi has the characteristic to be the most inland city in the world, being the furthest location on earth from any ocean. The population is a mix of two major ethnic groups, such as the Uyghur and Han. In top of that other groups are present, for instance the city includes Kyrgyz, Kazakhs, Mongols and Hui Muslims. Moreover even if Urumqi represents a Chinese destination the main language is not mandarin, but Uyghur, a Turkic language.  Furthermore only a narrow number of people speak English, even in the major hotel Chain, so it is considered helpful to have the name of the hotel or destination written in Chinese, for this reason is always better to book a tour with China Tour especially if you are travelling for the first time to China.

Urumqi is easily accessible from almost all the main and medium size airports present in China, for more information is advised to consult the main travel toolChina Flights.

Urmuqi offers several attractions that give the opportunity to revive the past history, for a better understanding of the Xinjang culture origins. The main site that tourist cannot miss out when travelling to Urmuqi is The Xiajiang Regional Museum. The latter was firstly built in 1953; its assortment covers an area of 7,800 square meters, including a entirety collection of 50’000 items representing every single aspect of the ethnic and social life of the 12 minorities that lived in Xinjiang. The museum surprises tourists as it displays a wide collection of very well preserved corpses, dated back almost 4,000 years ago. Those bodies differ from the Egyptian mummies, (conserved by embalming procedures) as Urumqi bodies were dried by a particular natural environment. The outstanding collection in includes all type of citizens, but the most impressive is the “Loulan beauty” which has preserved his red hair, large eyes, and long hair for more than 4,000 years. Another must-see attraction in Urumqi is the Hongshan “Red Mountain”, it includes an breath-less view of the city, but also includes the Light Temple entrance which represents a Buddhist temple. The mountain also offers a cable service or a path of 14km for those more adventurous tourists, leading to the Celestial Capital Peak, that offers a unique experience “up in the clouds” and a celestial lake (see pictures).

During the past Urumqi has represented one of the main destinations of the ancient Silk Road, indeed still today the Xinjiang capital offers the traditional Islamic Market, Da Bazar also known as Erdaoqiao market situated in the downtown offering a unique market and culinary experience. The Silk Road history can also be discovered Thanks to the “Xinjiang Silk Road Museum”, which it can be found just next to the Grand Bazaar, the museum makes great use of the English language giving the opportunity to everyone to enjoy the ancient path that stretches along China.

For more information about the city capital of Urumqi, it is advised to visit China Travel, a website that provides all the necessary information.

Gansu and its many Wonders!!

On June 20, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Cool Places, Must-sees, Tips & Ideas, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

Gansu Province is positioned between Qinghai, Tibet and Inner Mongolia it is about 4,900 feet above sea level. Being a part of northwestern China, Gansu covers all of 175,289 square mile with a population of 24 million. The capital is Lanzhou. On the west of Lanzhou and the Yellow River the well-known “Hexi Corridor,” this […]

Gansu Province is positioned between Qinghai, Tibet and Inner Mongolia it is about 4,900 feet above sea level. Being a part of northwestern China, Gansu covers all of 175,289 square mile with a population of 24 million. The capital is Lanzhou. On the west of Lanzhou and the Yellow River the well-known “Hexi Corridor,” this is an essential passage on the ancient Silk Road stretching to the west. Visiting this lovely place is only a click away while checking out China Travel; you can find it easy to go to Gansu as part of their offered China Tours.

Gansu is rich with history, cultural heritage, grottoes, ancient buildings and other cultural relics. Ethnic groups around the world congregate in Gansu, which makes it a unique tourist destination with a range of traditional costumes to gaze at. While at Gansu you can take in the grasslands, the Gobi desert, and snow-covered mountains which add beauty to this mystifying land.

Places to be while visiting this area would be Lanzhou, Labrang Lamasery, the Suspended Great Wall, and the Maijishan Grottoes.

Lanzhou – was once called Jincheng and is now the capital of Gansu Province. Through Lanzhou is where the Yellow River flows, and is also the center of transportation in northwest. The ideal environment allows for melons, honeydew melons, and peaches to grow. You can catch the view of the Yellow River from the green corridor.

Labrang Lamasery- is located in the western Xiahe County in Gansu Province. Labrang Lamasery is about a 5 to 6 hour drive south from Lanzhou. The lamasery was built in 1709 which was the 48th year of the reign of Emperor Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty. It is one of the six largest religious temples of the Gelug Sect of China’s Lamaism, second only to Potala Palace in Lhasa at Tibet. The lamasery covers 202 acres and has more than 10,000 halls and accommodates over 3,000 lamas.

The Suspended Great Wall- was called the West Great Wall in the past. Located 5 miles north of Jiayuguan Pass, it was built on the east side of Heishan Mountain in 1539, which was the 18th year of Jiajing’s reign of the Ming Dynasty. The walls were made of compressed earth. In some places the wall is almost ve rtical so that it has been called the Cliff Wall.

Mogao Grottoes- also known as “1000 Buddha Cave” they are located 15.5 miles southeast of Dunhuang City. With the length of 1 mile, the Grottoes weave their way through the broken cliff at the eastern foot of Mingsba Hill. There are five layers of caves that are built into the mountain. Historical records states that the Mogao Grottoes were constructed in 366 BC. There are said to be around 492 caves in which murals and sculptures representing different dynasties have been well preserved to this day. The Mogao Grottoes are listed in the World Cultural Heritage and are rated as key relics under state protection.

To witness these sites for yourself check out what is offered and where you or your family would like to visit in China. China Travels offers a lot of diverse places, and includes and guarantees nothing but fun fun fun .

One of the Seven Wonders of the world

On June 20, 2011, in Cool Places, Must-sees, Tours, by Jack Li

The great wall was developed in the Ming dynasty as a result of disturbances from the Dadan, Tufan and Nuzhen. The main line of the wall started from Jiuliancheng near the Yalu River in the east to the west of Juyongguan pass.  The complete wall now stretches from Shanhaiguan in the east, to Lop Nur […]

The great wall was developed in the Ming dynasty as a result of disturbances from the Dadan, Tufan and Nuzhen. The main line of the wall started from Jiuliancheng near the Yalu River in the east to the west of Juyongguan pass.  The complete wall now stretches from Shanhaiguan in the east, to Lop Nur in the west, around the southern edge of Mongolia.  The great wall is one of the Seven Wonders of the World. You can visit this wonderful location by booking through travel to Beijing. Cheap China Flights are also available.

Before the great wall was built, the Chinese people had prior experience in wall building. The wall was made by rammed earth and gravel between board frames. During the Ming dynasty, the wall was constructed to along the northern border of China. The Ming construction of the great wall was much stronger than the previous dynasty due to the use of bricks and stones rather than rammed earth.  As the Mongolian raid in china intensified, the Ming devoted more time towards the repair and reinforcement of the wall. The section closer to Beijing was made the strongest.

Today, the different sections of the great wall include Gubeiko, JinshanLing, Simatai, Jiankou, Mutianyu, Huanghua, Juyongguan and Badaling. Juyongguan and Badaling are the closest sections to Beijing. Badaling is the most visited by tourists. It is a great section for viewing the full beauty of the wall. Mutianyu is a good section for those who would prefer hiking the wall; it is also much steeper than Badaling.

In the ancient times, Badaling section was used to protect the capital from the attack of foreign bodies. As a result, Badaling was given the name North Gate. Over one hundred million visitors have walked on the Badaling section of the great wall. Mutianyu section is in between Juyongguan, Badaling, Jiankou and Huanghua in the west, and Gubeiko, Simatai and JinshanLing to the east. This section is the largest and the best overall in quality. The unique feature in Mutianyu section of the wall is the presence of watchtowers. Compared to other sections, Mutianyu has twenty-two watchtowers, which makes it easier to view the scenery of the wall in every hundred meters.

If you prefer going to a less crowded section of the wall, Simatai is the best option. It is over hundred kilometers on the northeastern side of Beijing. Twenty well-preserved watchtowers are located on the west and thirteen rugged watchtowers are located on the east. Part of JinshanLing has been restored, and is located at the west of Simatai. During the summer, Huanghua section usually has yellow flowers, which explains the name Huanghua meaning yellow flower. Jiankou great wall is built along the mountains, making it a very good place for viewing the wall. Close to Juyongguan are other historical attractions like the life sized terracotta warriors and a temple. Gubeiko is connected to both JinshanLing and Simatai.

Having the opportunity to view all the sections of the wall was a very exciting experience. Each section had its own unique feature making it stand out in comparison to the other sections. If you are interested in seeing one of the Seven Wonders of the World, book your China Flights today and visit all or your favorite section of the Great Wall.

 

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