Yushan Park

On August 31, 2011, in Guilin, Historical Relics, Parks & Gardens, Temples, by Jack Li

YushanPark is situated in the south of the North Pole Square in Guilin, next to the Yushan Bridge.  The park got its name because Yu Mountain located inside the park.  It is a popular starting point for tours around Guilin.  The park is designed in grand detail, combining traditional and modern styles and the glamour […]

YushanPark is situated in the south of the North Pole Square in Guilin, next to the Yushan Bridge.  The park got its name because Yu Mountain located inside the park.  It is a popular starting point for tours around Guilin.  The park is designed in grand detail, combining traditional and modern styles and the glamour of the East and West.  The whole park can be divided into two parts.  The northern part is a typical modern park with springs and waterfalls, surrounded by picturesque scenery. During the night, the park’s beauty is enhanced by colorful illuminations. In the southern part of the park, a reconstruction of YudiTemple and magnificent “Wufu Tower” (symbolizing peace, long life, wealth, safety, morality and good ending) with a bell are particularly worth mentioning.   There are many other unique constructions in the southern part of the park, such as the marble “Jiu chongtian” (meaning ‘nine spheres of Heaven’) and “Jiya Garden” with a great collection of rare treasures, handicrafts and more.

Yushan Park Attractions

Yu Mountain

Shaoyin Cave

Nanxun Pavilion

The Relic of Shun Temple

Yushan Park Story

1. Yudi Temple and Chess

The mountain is named after Emperor Yu, who passed the mountain during his journey to the South. To memorize the emperor’s visit, the Yudi Temple was built in the Qin dynasty.  The Temple has a history of over two thousand years.  At the entrance to the temple, there is a bronze statue of Emperor Yu’s little brother Xiang, the inventor of Chinese Chess (called ‘xiangqi’ in Chinese). According to the legend, Xiang was known as a cheeky boy, having no respect for his older brother’s orders.  He mended his ways after Yu’s death. Xiang guarded the temple’s doors to keep the monsters from disturbing his older brother at rest.  Xiang became so intelligent, that all his hair fell down and he became bald. That is how the Chinese idiom”Cong Ming Jue Ding” (signifying a person of unusually high IQ) came to life. His invention is a good example of his intelligence. It is said that if one wants to be clever or succeed in gambling, he or she should touch Xiang’s head.

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Yonghegong Lama Temple Travel Tips

On August 31, 2011, in Beijing, More Places of Interest, Temples, Tours, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Walking past Guozijian East Gate, you will see a simple and classical temple. This is Lama Temple, the largest and most well-preserved Lama temple in Beijing. Lama Temple was officially open to public since 1981 as a place for religious activities. Everyday numerous people come to the temple and offer incense, and you may smell […]

Walking past Guozijian East Gate, you will see a simple and classical temple. This is Lama Temple, the largest and most well-preserved Lama temple in Beijing. Lama Temple was officially open to public since 1981 as a place for religious activities. Everyday numerous people come to the temple and offer incense, and you may smell the fragrance of the incense outside of the temple yard.

Best Seasons to Visit Yonghegong Lama Temple

Spring and autumn are the best seasons for travelling in Beijing, especially in autumn when the weather is cool and pleasant. So you may come for a visit anytime in April, May, September or October.

Yonghegong Lama Temple Best Routes

Usually the visit should start along the main axis of the major temples from the front to the back. Then go clockwise around the axis to visit the rest of the temple. Situated on the main axis are the Mountain Gate, Tianwang Hall, Lama Temple Main Hall, Yongyou Hall, Falun Hall, Wanfuge Hall. On the east and the west are the Side Halls and the Four Lecture Halls (the Scripture Hall, the Vajrayana Hall, the Mathematics Hall and the Medicine Lord Hall).

Yonghegong Lama Temple Ticket

Entrance ticket: RMB 25

Opening hours: 9:00-17:00

How to get to Yonghegong Lama Temple

By subway: Take Line 2 or Line 5 and get off at Yonghegong Lama Temple Station. Get out of the station by Exit C. Walk 150 metres to the west and you will come to the Lama Temple.

By bus: Take bus 62, 13, 116, 44 or Te-2 and get off at Yonghegong Station. Or take bus 13, 116, 684 and get off at Guozijian Station.

The Wanfu Hall

On August 31, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Temples, by Jack Li

The Wanfu Hall (literally “the hall of ten thousand buddhas”) is situated behind the Falun Hall in the Lama Temple. It is the most magnificent hall in the temple, consisting of three seperated parts linked by corridors. The middle part of Wanfu Hall is a three floor main hall, with the two floor Yansui Hall […]

The Wanfu Hall (literally “the hall of ten thousand buddhas”) is situated behind the Falun Hall in the Lama Temple. It is the most magnificent hall in the temple, consisting of three seperated parts linked by corridors. The middle part of Wanfu Hall is a three floor main hall, with the two floor Yansui Hall to its left, and the two floor Yongkang Hall to its right. The three halls seem to blend into each other, and form a harmonious building. The elegant paintings on the walls and eaves somewhat represent the architectural style of the Liao (AD907-AD1125) and the Jin (AD1115-AD1234) Dynasty.

The building is named “wanfu” because there are about ten thousand small statues of buddha placed inside the walls of the hall. However, the most attracting thing in the hall is not the walls of ten thousand buddhas, but a huge statue of Maitreya. You can see the famous statue once you enter the Wanfu Hall. It is a 26 meter high statue made by one single piece of white sandalwood. The precious timber was a gift from the sixth Dalai Lama of Tibet to Emepror Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty. To carve the timber, the emperor spent over 80 thousand silver dollars in total. The wooden Maitreya looks tall and strong, with gildings all over his body, on which dotted various beautiful gemstones. The cassock he wears is made of yellow satin that worth 5 thousand silver dollars.   It is one of the three treasures of the Lama Temple.

In addition, there is a wooden niche made of Jinsi Nanmu, a very precious timber in the eastern side hall of the main hall. Skilled carpenter carved 99 vivid cloud-dragons over it. The wonderful niche is another treasure of the Lama Temple. The third treasures is the 500-Buddhist-arhats hill in the Falun Hall.

Yonghegong Lama Temple

The Yongyou Hall

On August 31, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Temples, by Jack Li

The Yongyou Hall is situated right behind the Lama Temple Main Hall. From the outside, you can easily identify that the hall is seperated into 5 rooms. There used to be 10 rooms inside the halls. During renovations, each of the two adjoining rooms were united as one. When Emperor Yongzheng moved into the Forbidden […]

The Yongyou Hall is situated right behind the Lama Temple Main Hall. From the outside, you can easily identify that the hall is seperated into 5 rooms. There used to be 10 rooms inside the halls. During renovations, each of the two adjoining rooms were united as one. When Emperor Yongzheng moved into the Forbidden City, he lived in the Lama Temple, and used the Yongyou Hall as his study and bedroom. Later after he died, his coffin was temporarily placed in the hall for condolence. Because of this event, the Yongyou Hall became a place where memorial ceromonies of the royal family were often held in the Qing Dynasty. The name of the Hall, “Yongyou”, literally means blessing all the emperors that has passed away.

In the centre of the Yongyou Hall, there are three lotus-like seats. The statues of the Medicine Buddha, the Amitabha, and the Shihou Buddha are placed from left to right in a row, sitting quietly on the seats, with an average height of 2.35 meters. All of the three statues are made of sanders. On the eastern wall of the hall hangs a beautiful portrait of the White Tara, and on the western wall, an exquisite tapestry of the Green Tara. Rumor has it that the tapestry used to be destroyed for careless protection. It is Emperor Qianlong’s mother and her maids who renovated it according to the remains. The precious tapestry has a history of more than 290 years now.

Yonghegong Lama Temple

The Lama Temple Main Hall

On August 31, 2011, in Beijing, More Places of Interest, Temples, by Jack Li

The Lama Temple Main Hall was the place where Yongqinwang, later Emperor Yongzheng, received the officials and the generals. In the north of the Hall there are three bronze statues of the Three Buddhas¡: Sakyamuni in the middle, Dipamkara on its left and Maitreya on its right, each of almost two metres high. There are […]

The Lama Temple Main Hall was the place where Yongqinwang, later Emperor Yongzheng, received the officials and the generals. In the north of the Hall there are three bronze statues of the Three Buddhas¡: Sakyamuni in the middle, Dipamkara on its left and Maitreya on its right, each of almost two metres high. There are two sets of Three Buddhas in Buddhism. One is Sakyamuni with Medicine Master Buddha of the Eastern World on its left and Amitabha Buddha of the Western World on its right. These are the Three Buddhas of Space, meaning that Buddha is everywhere. However, the statues in the Lama Temple are the Three Buddhas of Time. Sakyamuni represents the present, Dipamkara the past, and Maitreya the future. The three of them together symbolize that Buddha exists at all times. On the northwest corner of the Main Hall there is the bronze standing statue of the Goddess of Mercy, and on the northwest corner the bronze standing statue of Maitreya. On the holy seat in front of the two mountain walls sits the statues of the Eighteen Arhats. Facing the Main Hall in the front yard are the Four Lecture Halls.

Yonghegong Lama Temple

The Falun Hall

On August 31, 2011, in Beijing, More Places of Interest, Temples, by Jack Li

The Falun Hall is one of the largest halls in the Lama Temple. It used to be the place where grand rites and ceremonies were held, and where the monks chanted sutras. The architectural style of the hall represents a perfect combination of Han Culture and Tibetan Culture. The plane of the hall has a […]

The Falun Hall is one of the largest halls in the Lama Temple. It used to be the place where grand rites and ceremonies were held, and where the monks chanted sutras. The architectural style of the hall represents a perfect combination of Han Culture and Tibetan Culture. The plane of the hall has a shape of cross. On the roof of it, there are 5 Tibetan golden pagodas. A huge lotus-shaped seat is placed at the centre of the hall, upon which sits a 6.1 meters high coppery statue of master Tsongkhapa, who was the founder of Shamanism, a branch of Tibetan Buddhism. He greets the tourists with his gracious smile. Built in 1924, it took 2 years for the skilled craftsmen to finish the statue, costing for more than 200 thousand silver dollars in total. Behind the statue, there is an wood carving, 500-Buddhist-arhats hill. The narra hill-like wood carving is about 5 meters wide, 3.5 meters long, and 0.3 meters thick. On the hill, you can see vivid arhats made of gold, silver, copper, iron, and tin. Each of them is only 0.1 meters high, dotted among the wooden hill. The exquisite 500-Buddhist-arhats hill is one of the three treasures in the Lama Temple. In front of master TsongKhapa’s statue, there is a basin made of Jinsi Nanmu (a valuable timber). It is said that Emperor Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty bathed in the basin three days after he was born.

Besides the statue and the wood carvings, the hall is also famous for the colorful drawings on the wall and the Buddhist scriptures stored inside. On the eastern and western walls, there are elegant frescos telling interesting stories about master Sakyamuni. It shows that how he was born form his mother’s armpit, how he acquired profound knowledges, and how he became a buddha eventually. Famous Buddhist scriptures, for example, the Tripitaka, are stored on the shelves in front of the eastern and western walls. The Falun Hall is filled with Buddhist relics and treasures, you would gain a better understanding of Buddhism if you visit there.

Yonghegong Lama Temple

Yonghegong Lama Temple

On August 31, 2011, in Beijing, Historical Relics, More Places of Interest, Must-sees, Temples, by Jack Li

Yonghegong Lama Temple is on the northeast corner of the City of Beijing. It used to be a eunuch supervisor residence. In the 33rd year of Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty (1694), the Emperor ordered the construction of an imperial residence here and granted it to his fourth son, Yin Zhen (later Emperor Yongzheng). In […]

Yonghegong Lama Temple is on the northeast corner of the City of Beijing. It used to be a eunuch supervisor residence. In the 33rd year of Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty (1694), the Emperor ordered the construction of an imperial residence here and granted it to his fourth son, Yin Zhen (later Emperor Yongzheng). In the third year of Yongzheng it became the temporary palace and its name was changed into Yonghegong. In 1735, Yongzheng passed away and his coffin was kept here for a short time; for this reason the temple’s green glazed roofs was revised into yellow ones (yellow is the colour exclusive to the Chinese emperors). Because Emperor Qianlong was born in the temple, the temple was considered a blessed place and was renovated to be of the same size as the Forbidden City with yellow roofs and red walls. In the ninth year of Qianlong (1744), Yonghegong was revised into a Lama Temple for Tibetan Buddhism. In 1983, the State Council of China listed it as one of the key Buddhist temples in the Han region of China. Yonghegong Lama Temple is a Buddhist temple of the highest scale throughout the country.

The temple is mainly composed of three delicate memorial arches and five magnificent halls, with a total area of 66,400 square metres of thousands of halls and rooms. It consists of Tianwang Hall, Daxiong Hall, Yongyou Hall, Falun Hall and Wanfuge Hall; apart from this, it also contains the East and West Side Halls, the Four Lecture Halls(the Scripture Hall, the Vajrayana Hall, the Mathematics Hall and the Medicine Lord Hall). From the south to the north, the sizes of the courtyards taper and those of the temples increase, so the layout of the temple is one of layers of courtyards with the major halls hidden deep inside, which is an aggregation of the architectural characteristics of the Han, Manchu, Mongolian and Tibetan nationalities. In the southern courtyard of the Temple there are three tall decorated archways, one huge wall carved with murals and a couple of stone lions. Walking past the archways you will come to a shaded path paved with quarry bricks, called Niandao (the Carriage Road). To the north is the main gate to the Temple, Zhaotao Gate, inside of which two Bell-drum Towers stand on each side, and outside there lies the richly decorated corridor. Beside one of the towers there is an impressive eight-ton bronze pot used for cooking Laba porridge (a traditional dish eaten on the 8th of the 12th lunar month) in the old days. Continuing to the north you will come to the Eight-angled Tablet Pavilion where the tablet recording the history of the temple is kept. The scripture on the tablet is written in Han, Tibetan, Mongolian and Manchu languages.

Yonghegong Lama Temple Attractions:

Yonghegong Main Hall

Yongyou Hall

Falun Hall

Wanfuge Hall

Yonghegong Lama Temple Stories:

1. Elimination of the Ghosts

In the Lama Temple two performances are respectively held on the 30th day of the 1st month and on the 1st day of the 2nd month of the lunar calendar. In the first one is called Yangui (the performance of the ghosts) and the second one Dagui (the elimination of the ghosts). The ghosts refer to those powerful anti-Buddhist aristocrats and pagans, and the performances are demonstrations to intimidate the heretics. So the actors put on furious and frightening looks in order to drive away or subjugate the evil spirits.

2. Dongshu Yard

Every Chinese emperor after Emperor Qianlong had to come to the Lama Temple at least three times a year to pay their respect to the Buddha. On the day of birth (August 25th) and the day of death (January 1st) of Qianlong, the emperors must visit the temple in rich and solemn attire and pay their respects to their ancestor; and on the Summer Solstice of May the emperors also came to the Temple to worship the Buddha and then retire to Dongshu Yard to eat noodle made of new wheat with sesame source. Dongshu Yard served as the main resting place for the emperors. According to the historical record, the then Dongshu Yard was as grand as the present Lama Temple, and the two distinct complexes composed the entire site. The Dongshu Yard had been a replica of the Imperial Palace in many ways such as its decoration, contents and layout; some officials and generals used to work here and one of their major jobs was to look after the huge collection of treasures and antiques stored there. In 1900, Dongshu Yard was looted and burnt down by the Japanese army. The splendour of the place has become past history.

3. The Luohan Dish of the Lama Temple

The Luohan Dish of the Lama Temple is related to a Buddhist festival¡ªWeisai Festival, meaning the Day of the Full Moon. To the Buddhists this is a day of great importance because it is bound with the birth, the enlightenment and the Nirvana of Sakyamuni. In May, 1990, the then chairman of the Chinese Buddhism Association proposed to make the day of the full moon in April of the lunar calendar the memorial day of the Buddha for all the Han Buddhist temples. On that day, the monks living in the Lama Temple will light up one hundred crisp oil lamps one by one and put flowers and flower casts made by crisp oil and Zanba (a kind of food made of barley flour) around them. At noon a big lunch will be held for all that comes to the temple, including monks and worldly people. This lunch is called Luohan Dish and is made up of vegetables only. According to the Buddhist doctrines, all Buddhists should stick to vegetables as a demonstration of the quality of Buddhist mercy and benevolence as well as an important part of daily Buddhist practice. Vegetables are symbols of simplicity and purity, and are believed to be conducive to a heart of mercy and benevolence. The name, Luohan Dish, comes from the Eighteen Arhats who, under the instruction of Sakyamuni, would never achieve nirvana so as to stay in this world and spread Buddhist doctrines to the people. Usually, to make Luohan Dish, monks of all the temples carefully select eighteen kinds of vegetables in honour of the Eighteen Arhats.

Ice Hockey A Hit in Beijing

On August 31, 2011, in Activities, Beijing, Entertainment, Featured China Stories, by admin

When one thinks of the sports in which China excels, swimming, gymnastics or track and field usually come to mind. But ice hockey? While the sport may not have as big a following as soccer or basketball, there are an increasing number of youngsters who are learning about slap shots, hat tricks and teamwork.   […]

When one thinks of the sports in which China excels, swimming, gymnastics or track and field usually come to mind. But ice hockey? While the sport may not have as big a following as soccer or basketball, there are an increasing number of youngsters who are learning about slap shots, hat tricks and teamwork.

 

Flying Tigers

Nestled in a newly built neighborhood on the northwest side of Beijing, high up on the fourth floor of a massive shopping complex, is one of this city’s newest ice rinks. It is also the site of an ice hockey camp for young, talented players.

For several weeks last month, the Flying Tigers hosted a summer camp for these young players. Most were from Beijing, but some came from as far away as HongKong and the northeastern province of Heilongjiang.

“Initially coming to China where hockey isn’t their main focus, I was very impressed with the skill level of the kids right from the 04-05s, right up to the big kids,” said Kevin Masters, one of several coaches flown in from Canada. “The specifics of the skating and the individual type skills are absolutely comparable to what we see back home in Canada.”
Supportive parents

And where there is ice hockey – a sport that requires a lot of time and money – there are always ice hockey parents cheering their kids on and giving pointers.

“When my son started playing ice hockey, we had just seen the movie Transformers and he thought goalies look like Transformers with all of their pads on and because of that it was his favorite position,” said Zhou Jianwei, whose eight-year-old son is a goalie.  Zhou says that in China, where many families have only one child, his son is learning more than just a sport.

“Many kids [in China] lack a sense of teamwork and what it means to work hard for what they want to get because their parents have taken care of everything for them. But since he’s started playing ice hockey, he’s slowly begun to understand how to work together with his teammates to accomplish a goal and gained a sense of how [in society] people need to help one another to get things done,” Zhou said.

China’s colder northeast provinces are largely considered the home of ice hockey in the country. And, a large majority of the players on China’s national ice hockey team grew up there.
New ice rinks

Now, with new rinks in Beijing, that is starting to change. Local hockey organizers note that the number of U16 or 16 year-old ice hockey players in Beijing is likely to surpass the number of players in the northeast in the next season or two.

The reasons, they say, are because more families in Beijing can afford ice hockey, which is an expensive sport, and because the northeast is opening up to other sports, which is taking players away from the ice.

Cao Zhennan says her father played hockey while growing up in the northeast and helped to get her son interested.  She says the lessons her son learns from ice hockey far outweigh any future prospect of making the national team or playing more competitively.

“Ice hockey is a fast and physical sport, it’s a really a fun sport,” Cao said. “On top of that, he’s a boy and we got into the sport hoping it would help him become more courageous. It (ice hockey) also gets more interesting as the kids learn how to work together and make a lot of new friends.”

Charlie, an 11-year-old, who plays right wing, says his friend Abiyasi got him interested in the sport a year-and-a-half ago. Charlie says the sport has other benefits besides keeping him away from computer games.

“I think it’s fun. It’s good for my health and it’s not boring!” Charlie said.

 

More teams

Mark Simon, vice president and head coach of the Beijing Imperial Guard Hockey Club, one of several teams in the Beijing Junior Hockey League, says team rosters have been growing in recent years.

“A group of us, our club and a few others started a league in 2008 and 2009 with four teams, which included about 50-60 players,” Simon said. “Now, last season in 10-11, we had about 25 teams, so about 300 players, 300-350.”

Simon, an ex-banker from Montreal who started playing ice hockey at the age of five, says he left his gear in Canada when he first came to China. Several years later, he works for a company that builds rinks in Asia.

He says that as far as Asian cities go, Beijing is quite spoiled.

“To have four full ice sheets is quite rare,” noted Simon. “And that is one of the reasons ice hockey is growing here a lot more quickly than in places like Hong Kong. Hong Kong has got a huge hockey following, a lot of kids playing, but they are very limited by the number of ice surfaces they have.”

 

Just getting started

Lane Moore, another coach who is helping out at the Flying Tigers camp, says ice hockey is just getting started in Beijing.

“With their development of new rinks, new ice surfaces, the numbers in Beijing are going through the roof and I am hearing in Shanghai it is the same way and I just think the potential for ice hockey in China is going to keep going,” Moore said.

Both he and Kevin Masters say they never expected to be running an ice hockey camp in China, and certainly not on the fourth floor of a shopping mall. But they say the publicity from curious shoppers helps build interest in a sport that they say is quickly on its way from a novelty to the mainstream.

 

This article is from VOA.

About VOA:The Voice of America (VOA) is an international multimedia broadcasting service from the U.S.A. with news and information in more than 40 languages. VOAMobile provides easy access to the day’s top stories. For in-depth news visit us at VOANews.com.

 

Wild Elephant Valley

On August 30, 2011, in Activities, China Attractions, Nature Scenery, Yunnan, by Jack Li

The Wild Elephant Valley is located in the north of Mengyang Town, Jinghong City (Xishuangbanna). The wild elephants moved about most often in this area, which gives the name Wild Elephant Valley. The virgin forests here are the home of wild elephants. They often come here bathing, seeking for food or playing in the water. […]

The Wild Elephant Valley is located in the north of Mengyang Town, Jinghong City (Xishuangbanna). The wild elephants moved about most often in this area, which gives the name Wild Elephant Valley. The virgin forests here are the home of wild elephants. They often come here bathing, seeking for food or playing in the water. China has long been an elephant producing country. However, with the enlargement of the human inhabitant area and gradual changes of the natural environment, there are only about 300 Asian elephants living in the virgin forests of Xishuangbanna. Here naturally becomes the best place for wild elephants to stay and live. In 1990, the government began to set up a forest park and open to visitors in 1996, with viewing the wild elephants and the tropical rain forests as the theme of the park. The houses for watching wild elephants are all built uniquely on the trees, so visitors can watch the elephants closely, and the visitors are quite interested in this kind of buildings. When watching the elephants, you can stay next to the various birds, and meanwhile the pleasure of enjoying the butterfly garden, 2 wonderful elephant shows everyday will all give you a lasting memory about your trip to Xishuangbanna. The wild Chinese elephants live in the equatorial forest of Xishuangbanna of Yunnan Province. Wild Elephants Valley is the place in Xishuangbanna where wild elephants move about most often and frequently. Convenient in traffic, distinctive in equatorial forest landscape and easy to see wild elephants, it has become the popular tourist site in Xishuangbanna. Here also holds the first elephant training school. The tamed ones can bow and nod to give the visitors a warm welcome. Visitors can have a fun ride on the elephants’ backs or trunks. Even a massage by those huge but amicable animals!

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Yang Causeway Travel tips

On August 30, 2011, in Chinese Towns & Villages, Guilin, Rivers & Gorges, Tours, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Yang Causeway is the setting sail dock for pleasure boats in the Lijiang River. Scenery of this area is the essence of wonderful scenery in the Lijiang River scenic spot. Besides the beautiful landscape, ridges and peaks, waterfalls, flowers and trees and waterside cottages are all attractive for tourists. There stands a mountain in the […]

Yang Causeway is the setting sail dock for pleasure boats in the Lijiang River. Scenery of this area is the essence of wonderful scenery in the Lijiang River scenic spot. Besides the beautiful landscape, ridges and peaks, waterfalls, flowers and trees and waterside cottages are all attractive for tourists. There stands a mountain in the rear of Yangdi Village, the mountain peaks of which look like a pair of inverted trotters. Yangdi has the harmonic tone of trotter, that’s where the name comes from.

Best time to visit Yang Causeway

The best time to visit Yang Causeway is May to October. Fine weather and limited rainfalls make it suitable for tourists to visit Yang Causeway in these months.

Yang Causeway Tickets

Travelling along Yang Causeway on foot is free of charge.

How to get to Yang Causeway

Yangdi asphalted road that connects Guiyang road is the main access to Yangdi County, as long as 13 kilometers. Country roads include Zhongnan-Tuling, Tuling-Xialong, Zhongnan-Tangjia and Yangdi-Banbiandu. Except villages like Yangdi, Zhongnan, Tuling, Tangjia and Langshi, other villages have not been open to traffic. There are scheduled buses between Yangshuo and Yangdi, which come every twenty minutes and are very convenient. The so-called “Golden Waterway” the Lijiang River crosses over Yangdi County, as long as 16 kilometers. The path winds along mountain ridges all the way, keeping back a lot of glamorous landscapes. In recent years, the fashionable ecological walking tour that takes Yang Causeway as the starting point advocates “green ecology, human landscapes and natural landscapes”. Those characteristics have turn Yang Causeway to a hot tourist spot and tourists come one after the other in a continous line.

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