Shopping at China’s Silicon Valley

The best place to buy some electronic devices in Beijing is Zhong Guan Cun. This place is located in Haidian Disctrict between the 3rd and the 4th ring road. Zhong Guan Cun is a technology hub in this dicstrict, it is very famous all around China and it is also called the China’s Silicon Valley. […]

The best place to buy some electronic devices in Beijing is Zhong Guan Cun. This place is located in Haidian Disctrict between the 3rd and the 4th ring road. Zhong Guan Cun is a technology hub in this dicstrict, it is very famous all around China and it is also called the China’s Silicon Valley. This zone is mainly composed of education & research centers, high tech companies and markets. It is worth to see at night because of all the lights of the modern buildings and even by day, you would feel travelling to Shanghai, Hong Kong or to any other cities like that. It is definitely the best place to buy electronic devices at a good bargain.

There are 5 big electronic markets: Hailong Market, Guigu Market, Taipingyang Market, Dinghao Market and Kemao Market. These markets are in fact technology bazaars where you can find anything you need. They mainly sell computers, computer components, software, hardware, peripherals, tablets, mobile phones, accessories and cameras. Second-hand products are sold too, but you should be careful buying mobile phones for example, a lot of copies are available, so you should look more carefully before being fooled.

I first went there last week; I have heard that I could find enough good quality and cheap technology. Once out of the subway I felt like not being in the capital anymore, and I was quite lost in fact. I wanted to go there to buy an USB key and an additional extern rechargeable battery for my iPhone, so my phone would never be out of charge for my upcoming China tour. I watched for a while all the buildings behind me and casually step into a random building. The first impression that I had it’s that there were only Chinese people; I think that I haven’t seen any foreigners that day. I’ve never seen as much people carrying PC power stations like if it was shopping bags full of food in a supermarket. Like in any other place employees are welcoming you and ask you what you are looking for. But I didn’t know for who they work since the building is full of independent shops and stands, so I ignored them fearing that they want to make me pay a service that I didn’t need. They insisted a lot but they finally gave up and stop following us. So, we slowly walked through the alleys and discovered this “new world”. Yes, I used that word because most of the time I had no idea of what is sold in front of my eyes; components here and there. I think that this would be the Temple of Heaven for geeks. I finally found some USB key, I bought a 8Go key for only 35RMB. Then, I went to another stand to buy my rechargeable battery, at first she wanted to make me pay 260RMB but I finally got it at 160RMB. I don’t know what the product worth, but she told me that this was the best; I think that I’ll know the answer after my trip… Anyway it isn’t that expensive. By the way I think that I’m planning to buy an external hard drive and other software next time, and even buy some video games for my cousins.

No need to be fond of electronics and computer to appreciate these markets, just dive in this technological world! Don’t miss it if you travel to China.

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Hútòngs

On July 30, 2012, in Beijing, Getting Around, More Places of Interest, by Jack Li

Beijing is a city that has changed throughout the last years. But if you travel to Beijing and you want to know how the city was hundreds of years ago, there are places where you can go and still see the traditional streets. Don’t miss it in your Beijing Tour. The Hútòngs are basically the […]

Beijing is a city that has changed throughout the last years. But if you travel to Beijing and you want to know how the city was hundreds of years ago, there are places where you can go and still see the traditional streets. Don’t miss it in your Beijing Tour.

The Hútòngs are basically the old streets of Beijing, they were constructed during the Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties and they are the most ancient part of the city, they are so old that the oldest ones have up to 700 years of history.

The houses in the hútòngs normally have a square structure with a small entrance and a big interior open space where most of the domestic life is done, another peculiarity of the hútòngs is that the bathrooms are shared.

In the year 2000 they were more than 1400 Hútòngs just in the center of Beijing, but when the Olympics were given to Beijing they had to modify the street structure in order to hold all the infrastructures that were necessary for the event and now there are less than 1000 hútòngs in Beijing.

So if you want to visit the Hútòngs you just have to know where to go to see them, here there is a list of the places that still have hútòngs in Beijing:

–          Nanluogu Xiang; formed by 8 parallel hútòngs it’s 768 meters long and it’s protected since 1990

–          Yandai Xiejie; Built in the Qing dynasty this hútòng zone is famous for the Tea houses and bars that have given the zone a very active nightlife

–          Beijing Liulichang Culture Street; this is the place to see ancient things such as calligraphy or books.

–          Lingjing hútòng; its 640 meters long make this street one of the most unique and it’s worth visiting it.

–          Brick tower Hútòng; It’s one of the oldest hútòngs and it is well preserved with a tower built in the Jing dynasty, so you can visit it and feel the ancient times.

There are lots of other Hútòngs in the city of Beijing so if you are really interested it’s good to ask in your hotel or in the tourist information points to find where are all the hútòngs. They may seem similar because they all follow the same structure but there are huge differences in the materials and ways of construction depending on which dynasty the Hútòng was built.

The city of Beijing is full of places to go, but the Hútòngs are one of the most emblematic places to go in your Beijing tour, even if it’s only for a night in one of the bars of the Yanday Xiejie Hútòng or a walk in the Brick Tower Hútòng you have to visit these places before leaving Beijing because you’ll have a vision on how the city was hundreds of years ago before Beijing changed from a Chinese traditional town to the modern metropolis that is today.

 

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Shadow play.

On July 27, 2012, in Activities, Entertainment, by Jack Li

If you travel to China you’ll probably see lots of things that will amaze you, but one of the most curious things you can see in your Chinese Tour is the Shadow play, or Shadow Puppetry. The Shadow play is a form of storytelling that use cut out figures that are articulated and are held […]

If you travel to China you’ll probably see lots of things that will amaze you, but one of the most curious things you can see in your Chinese Tour is the Shadow play, or Shadow Puppetry.

The Shadow play is a form of storytelling that use cut out figures that are articulated and are held between a light and a screen. They can be very detailed and they move accorded to the Puppeteer who can make them move in a realistic way.

Although now is present through all the Asian continent it is said that this kind of storytelling was originated in China and, like most of the things that are from China, it has a very beautiful legend that explains how the Shadow play was created.

During the Han dynasty one of the concubines of emperor Wu died from an illness, the Emperor Wu, devastated, asked everybody in the realm to bring his beloved back to life.

One officer made a concubine figure made of donkey leather and articulated it with 11 joints, he painted it and he put it against an oil lamp, made this figure look as if the concubine was alive again.

The final of the legend is not very clear, but what it’s known is that some years later, on the Song dynasty the beginning of holidays was marked by a large quantity of Shadow Plays on the street.

It is said that in the Ming Dynasty there were 50 shadow plays groups in the City of Beijing alone.

From there the popularity of the Shadow play augmented, it was extended throughout Asia because the Mongols learned this kind of entertainment and they brought it everywhere they went.

When the Shadow Play began the screens were made of mulberry paper and the theme was always similar, events from the past wars or just Buddhist stories because that were the themes that interested the people.

The puppets were made of leather and they used sticks to move them through the scene.

Later Myths and Legends from Chinese culture were also added at the repertoire and they were accompanied by music specially prepared for the plays.

Although is quite difficult to find a Shadow because is not a big show and it can only be seen by a specific amount of people it is good to try to find one place to see it just for the experience.

Shadow play is an ancient Chinese art that has been entertaining people nearly a thousand years and since then it has not changed, so if during your China Travel you want to have a taste of how was the life in the ancient China why don’t you try to find a place where you can see Shadow plays? (Normally there isn’t any theater that does these shows regularly so it’s better to gather information at the hotel or online on where you can find Shadow play shows).

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The Best Western Eats in Beijing

On July 27, 2012, in Beijing, Restaurants, Restaurants & Food, by Jack Li

After having my share of delicious Chinese dishes with noodles, dumplings, and plenty of rice, a Western girl like me was starting to crave some familiar foods during my travel in Beijing. Fortunately, there are a number of wonderful restaurants in this city that offer all types of cuisine from Belgian, to Italian, to a […]

After having my share of delicious Chinese dishes with noodles, dumplings, and plenty of rice, a Western girl like me was starting to crave some familiar foods during my travel in Beijing. Fortunately, there are a number of wonderful restaurants in this city that offer all types of cuisine from Belgian, to Italian, to a good ole American-style cheeseburger. One of my favorite Beijing tours, I must confess, has been the ‘gourmet’ tour I have taken myself on, trying out various eateries in the area. So for any expats coming to Beijing, here are a few places I would like to recommend.

The Tree

For those looking for a mouthwatering pizza and pint of draught beer, make your way to The Tree. A regular stop for Beijing’s European community, this welcoming tavern in Sanlitun is best known for its Belgian whites and assorted stone oven baked pizzas. Decorated to resemble an authentic Belgian inn, it’s a favorite for families looking to grab a good meal come early in the evening, but it is also carries it usual crowd of drinkers who gather along the convivial brick-built bar.

If you have Italian on the mind, Annie’s is the ultimate must-do. The many awards and recognition it has received will not mislead you, this place is incredible. This gem of the Chaoyang district is a casual, cozy and tremendously welcoming bistro. It is a hands-down the best affordable Italian fare in Beijing. I recommend ordering a crisp pizza with thin dough bottom and rich stuffing. Save room for a delectable cannoli for dessert! These little devils are a tempting blend of cottage cheese and dried fruit with a touch of brandy in a fresh shell of fried dough. The staff here is super friendly, and don’t be surprised if you find yourself smiling throughout your entire experience there.

I am the stereotypical American girl. My daily diet favorites center on meat, bread, and cheese, and if it’s fried that’s even better. When I heard about Steak and Eggs, it didn’t take long before my wallet and I were on our way out the door. Offering classic American diner fare, this restaurant is the perfect place to grab an inexpensive Sunday breakfast. It’s also a great place for families! As the regular crowds of expats will confirm, the food here is extremely authentic. In one bite I was transported back to my native roots with my taste buds serving as the vehicle. The menu is chock-full of hearty burgers, apple pie and bottomless cups of coffee. Any American expat feeling homesick can come here for a little taste of comfort.

Element Fresh

The last place on my list today is Element Fresh. After getting my juicy, greasy, cheesy cravings satisfied, it’s equally important to find a place where I can just get a healthy, substantial meal. At Element Fresh, this is exactly what you will find, tons of variety and all delicious. Originally started in Shanghai, this restaurant provides nutritious Western food including salads, smoothies and sandwiches. They have a popular weekend brunch as well as including reasonably priced fare and quality drinks. I hope you get the chance to visit one or all of these places during your Beijing travels. I guarantee you will not be disappointed!

 

 

Pingyao

On July 26, 2012, in Chinese Towns & Villages, Must-sees, Shanxi, by Jack Li

Everybody knows that China is a land with thousands of years of history, perhaps now it’s famous for its big cities and the modernity, but if you travel to China make sure that you visit also the other part, the part of the ancient China, if you include it in your China Tour you will […]

Everybody knows that China is a land with thousands of years of history, perhaps now it’s famous for its big cities and the modernity, but if you travel to China make sure that you visit also the other part, the part of the ancient China, if you include it in your China Tour you will not regret it.

One of the most ancient and famous places of China is the city of Pingyao, in the Shanxi province, and is one of the best preserved city in China, with more than 1700 years of history.

The city of Pingyao has not changed in centuries and that’s what make this City a fantastic place to visit, you can see what was the life thousands of years ago and also try its delicious local cuisine (don’t miss the Moonpies!).

Pingyao has a lot of ancient buildings that can be visited through the entire city, buildings that are what made the city the economic and financial center of china centuries ago.

The City is divided in two parts, the Wall and the City itself.

The Wall was built, some said, in the 700 B.C, but it was rebuilt and augmented in the 12th century to protect the city from the enemies; now is more than six meters tall and 4 meters wide and it has a well that is 4 meters deep.

Inside the city there are buildings that are worth visiting and you can get a pass to see them all in three days so you have no excuse!

The city has a kind of bizarre symmetry, there are two main streets that cross each other and, for example, if there is a Buddhist temple on the right there is Confucianism in the left, the same happens with the Taoist temple and the Governmental Office, which makes Pingyao a unique city.

There are lots of places to visit apart from the temples, there are the first bank buildings in China and you can see how the accountancy, the transportation of money, the keeping and the management were hundreds of years ago.

Pingyao has also lots of shops and other entertainment and as the entire city is ancient you won’t find a “western” hotel in the city, they all are traditional, and that makes a difference between Pingyao and other cities.

That doesn’t mean that there’s no bars or places to go at night, Pingyao is very touristic and it’s always full of people you’ll find that the city changes from daytime to nighttime and that it is a very active city, full of bars and activities to do during the nights that you will spend in the city.

Pingyao is the best destination in your China Tour if you want to see ancient lifestyle but you don’t want to go very far from Beijing (it’s just at 400 km) it’s worth spending a couple of days in the city and discover another image of China that you’ll never forget.

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In the Presence of a Giant at Leshan

On July 26, 2012, in Historical Relics, Must-sees, Sichuan, by Jack Li

When planning your itinerary for traveling to China, the Sichuan Province holds many cultural, architectural, and historical treasures. One of its most well known is the Leshan Giant Buddha. Within every detail of its form, the Giant Buddha makes a profound impression carved into the side of a cliff, overseeing its three surrounding rivers. When […]

When planning your itinerary for traveling to China, the Sichuan Province holds many cultural, architectural, and historical treasures. One of its most well known is the Leshan Giant Buddha. Within every detail of its form, the Giant Buddha makes a profound impression carved into the side of a cliff, overseeing its three surrounding rivers. When I went to visit, I could not help but draw a comparison between this structure and one that is famous in my home country, Mount Rushmore. The main differences between these sites however, besides location, is that the Leshan Giant Buddha far surpasses Mount Rushmore in age and close-up viewing access to the public. The Buddha reaches an immense height of 233 ft. and is one of the world’s largest stone statues of the beloved deity. Construction of the Leshan Buddha dates back to the Tang Dynasty  in 713 AD and took nearly ninety years to complete. The location of this grand statue was defined by the convergence of the three neighboring rivers, the Min, Dadu and Qingyi.

Throughout China’s history, the strong currents of these rivers took many lives of those who worked in this watery locale. Due to these losses, the idea was formed to create a Buddha near the waters in hopes of taming their ferocity. Remarkably enough, however, a complex drainage system was also constructed to redirect water away from the Buddha to preserve its form. To see the Buddha, visitors board tour boats that deliver you to just the right locations in order to get close as well as far away views. You also have the option of viewing the great Buddha by entering the park and scaling up the cliff side. This is the best way to get very up close photographs of the Buddha’s features, but you have to put in the work of the ascending and descending climbs in order to get to these perfect observation points. The Leshan Giant Buddha gazes out to the horizon which spans over the meeting of three rivers in the Sichuan Province. Leshan is a must-see China tour for all travelers.

Planning your trip to China

This article especially targets people who has never been to China. As a European girl, I realized that travelling to China needs specific preparation and most of all… time. For some of you all the tips I will give would seem quite logical to you, however I know that before leaving we always have the […]

This article especially targets people who has never been to China. As a European girl, I realized that travelling to China needs specific preparation and most of all… time. For some of you all the tips I will give would seem quite logical to you, however I know that before leaving we always have the impression that we forgot something but we don’t know what. This is a list on which you can check on before taking your China flight.

Most important things (in the order)

1. Passport
Of course without a passport you can’t travel anywhere. Make sure it will be still valid 6 months after the return date and check if there are 2 blank pages left. If it isn’t the case you must anticipate and have a new passport, in some country it can take until 2 months to do that.

2. Flights
Book a flight to China. The cheapest flights are online, try to book them several months before your departure. It will cost you between 500 and 1,000$ for an economic round-trip flight depending on the season and the duration. You will have great chances to travel with Air China, China Eastern Airlines or China Southern Airlines. All the meals and drinks are free (no additional fee) and of course you will enjoy Chinese food. Chinese and other international movies will be displayed with English and Chinese subtitles.

3. Visa


You should go to the nearest Chinese Embassy or the Chinese Consulate to have a visa. Check on their website or call them first to know all the documents they need in addition of the application form so you won’t waste your time by getting there just for that information. In general you will be given your visa within 5 work days, or if you pay to speed it up within 48 hours, yet as we are insightful people the better would applying at least 2 weeks before the departure just in case, and not 2 days before.

Other tips

Make sure that your credit card has the logo “Visa”, so you can withdraw your money on some random ATM machines once arrived and not take all the money with you. And don’t be surprised most of the shops in China don’t have card machines, so check with your bank before leaving if you have a withdrawal limit per week or months since you’ll have to pay almost everything with cash.

Bring your own cellphone or an old one, it will always be useful to be contacted and to contact other people since your sim card won’t probably work in China. A lot of people think that buying a mobile phone is quite cheap here, but I think that it’s even more expensive that in your country, it is in my case. More over the cheapest phones, the one you had like 10 years ago, will cost you 200yuan if you really need one. Besides, the sim card and calls are very cheap; with only 30RMB you can text and call for 2 weeks if you don’t have any particular big needs. And be careful once your credit is over, you can’t receive any call, you have to recharge to be contacted.

My personal advice if you can’t speak Chinese or only few words: since Chinese people are not very good in English and only few of them can speak a foreign language, take pictures of toilets, food, water, bus, bed, fork, chopsticks… before leaving. You won’t waste time to look for the word in a dictionary and pronounce it in a weird accent, pictures is a language that anyone can understand!

These were the basic things not to forget before doing China tours. I hope you to enjoy your trip the best way as possible and send us a picture of your best memories in our Facebook to share your experience!

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Falling in love with Pandas

On July 25, 2012, in China Travel Gossip, Getting Around, Sichuan, Travel Info, by Jack Li

I’m sure that if you wanted to travel to China or if you want to a part of the reason is because you want to see real pandas! Everyone knows that China’s most popular animal is the giant panda bear. Dragons are their favorite animal from the mythology but pandas are the Chinese national’s emblem. […]

I’m sure that if you wanted to travel to China or if you want to a part of the reason is because you want to see real pandas! Everyone knows that China’s most popular animal is the giant panda bear. Dragons are their favorite animal from the mythology but pandas are the Chinese national’s emblem. When Chinese government wants to create deeper relations with a country they offer a panda to their friend. This tradition has begun in 608 during the Tang Dynasty. From now on, China prefers to lend their pandas to protect them instead of giving them. That’s how the United States of America received Ling a Giant Panda in 1972 and Japan has been entrusted some in 2008.

And I must say that over these last past years, pandas became kind of trendy. I mean, the World Wild Fund for Nature’s (WWF) logo is a Panda, one of the official mascot of the Olympic Games of 2008 representing Africa was a honoring Pandas, even Hollywood made a 3D motion movie called “Kung Fu Panda”, and thanks to the internet millions of people felt in love with those black and white bears watching funny videos or pictures. I must confess, I am one of them, I felt in love with pandas. Believe me or not but you can’t escape them, they are everywhere; in the zoos, on t-shirts, caps, shoes, clothes, notebooks, pens, fans, candies… And even in the Beijing’s 798 art district you can find a gallery dedicated to the giant bear. Making your own collection of panda-items wouldn’t be difficult after your China tours.

More seriously, if you want to see real pandas, it would be better to take a flight with China Southern Airlines and go on Panda research bases than going to parks and zoos in my opinion. Except from zoos or animal parks, there are two great places to see pandas in China: Sichuan province and Guangxi province.

- Sichuan province

Bifengxia Panda Base (Ya’an City)
After the earthquake in 2008, the pandas of Wolong National Nature Reserve were transferred to Bifengxia Panda Base, which was established at the end of 2003. It became the largest giant pandas base in China, there are 155 giant pandas in there.

the Giant Panda breeding and research base (north of Chengdu)
There are all the range of equipment of giant panda breeding, the panda house, feed room, health stations, giant panda museum and laboratory building in the base. Thousands of bundles of bamboo and bushes are planted there in order to approximate their natural environment.

- Guangxi province

Seven Star Park
This park is a zoo, but if you want to see panda super stars there, here you are. Indeed, Meimei the panda who lived the longest time used to live here until her death at 36. And you could see the 2 olympic pandas there too: Fenyi and Meixin.

Giant Pandas are an endangered species , associations like WWF are taking care of it, but if no one does anything they could disappear in the few decades. I know that the Bifengxia Giant Panda Base and the Giant Panda breeding and research base offers volunteer programs so, you can be closer to the black and white bears and do something for the environment stability. Bu the way if you are interested or concerned about this problem, help us to save panda by checking our Facebook page!

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Lend a Helping Hand: Volunteering in Beijing

When traveling to Beijing, the first things on any foreigner’s itinerary are seeing the Great Wall, joining tours of famous sites such as the Temple of Heaven, getting some great deals at the Silk Market, and having their fair share of Peking duck. However, for who feel like doing some good for others while in […]

When traveling to Beijing, the first things on any foreigner’s itinerary are seeing the Great Wall, joining tours of famous sites such as the Temple of Heaven, getting some great deals at the Silk Market, and having their fair share of Peking duck. However, for who feel like doing some good for others while in town, there are plenty of resources and opportunities to reach out here in the city. As per most countries, China’s population must cope with issues such as poverty, mental illness, environmental disasters, and illiteracy. Luckily, there are many organizations that give the native population as well as expats a chance to help out.

Volunteer teaching is a major resource of aid to the Beijing community. Education is a valuable tool in helping advance the lives of individuals by enabling them to gain the means needed to provide for themselves. If you are an expat in Beijing, you can help provide a major service by offering to teach English as a second language. One NPO called Compassion for Migrant Children, which organizes social and educational programs for the children of migrant workers. For the estimated half a million migrant children living in Beijing, organizations like CMC provide an opportunity for them to receive suitable academic instruction and vocational training. Other organizations to volunteer at are the Lotus Culture Center and China Education Initiative, which help bring enrichment into the lives of underprivileged children.

This past weekend I had a personal experience volunteering at one of the Huiling Community Services facilities. Public Health is another major concern here in Beijing that needs as many helping hands as possible. The Huiling Center helps individuals with disabilities learn life skills as well as arts and crafts, music, and athletics. In order to further improve the quality of life for its members, Huiling offers them opportunities to make money by working with tour groups and making jewelry. My experience there was absolutely amazing.  My colleagues and I were able to meet and spend time with a handful of mentally disabled ‘trainees’ there. We sang songs, danced, and played games together. My favorite part was the teambuilding exercises. Afterward, we got the chance to purchase several pieces of the beautiful handmade jewelry that were made by some of the trainees, from which the proceeds go toward funding the organization.

Poverty and the environment are other causes in Beijing that need lots of attention and provide many volunteering prospects. Wokai provides financial aid to villagers living in rural China in order to support their entrepreneurial projects. Wokai depends almost entirely on volunteers to translate, plan events and provide marketing services in order to advance the organization’s ambitious efforts. Other great organizations include Planet Finance and Rotaract. The latter offers resources to expats interested in starting up clothing and food drives in their areas.  For environmentally focused volunteering, check out the Roots and Shoots Eco-English program, which brings foreign volunteers across Beijing to classrooms where they can learn about  how to improve the environment, be nature-friendly, and get involved in events. This is great way to contribute your own new ideas to the environmental movement.

With so many different causes and organizations across Beijing, feel free to do a little good work during your China travel by volunteering your time. I know my volunteer experience made a deep impression on me, as well as provided memories I will cherish forever.

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Jinci temple

On July 25, 2012, in Must-sees, Parks & Gardens, Shanxi, Temples, by Jack Li

If you travel to China and you want to see a place that has a lot of history but is not typical for foreigners why don’t you take a train to Taiyuan and go to one of the most astonishing temples of the Shanxi region, and the whole country that has more than 3000 years […]

If you travel to China and you want to see a place that has a lot of history but is not typical for foreigners why don’t you take a train to Taiyuan and go to one of the most astonishing temples of the Shanxi region, and the whole country that has more than 3000 years of history and is one of the most beautiful places you can find in your China Travel?

What is called “The Jinci Temple” is a combination of buildings from different ages and a natural landscape that frames the buildings in a perfect environment and has a relaxing atmosphere ideal for those who seek the tranquility of an ancient place.

It’s better to visit it in the early morning, it opens at seven o’clock, and it’s bigger than it seems so it’s better if you have lots of time to wander in the multiple attractions that  the Jinci temple has to offer.

There are lots of buildings and statues and shrines and temples to see there but these are the must-sees and the things you cannot miss for you will not find them anywhere;

–          The Saint Mother’s hall; the oldest building in the complex, it’s one of the most important places of the ancient China, so make sure not to miss it.

–          The Flying Bridge across the Fish Pond: it was the first bridge built in that fashion in China and now is the only one that remains intact, its peculiarity is that it’s literally flying over the water; it has no columns in the middle.

–          The Figures of Maidservants: in the Mother Hall there are some very ancient clay statues that are worth seeing.



–          The Ancient Cypresses; these are three cypresses that represent a family, the “parents” are two trees of more than 3000 years old and the “son” is more than 1700 years old.-          The tablets of The Writing of the Emperors; hundreds of stones tables that hold the words and laws of some of the Chinese Emperors.-          The museums of paintings and Calligraphy that have taken some of the ancient residential buildings.-          The Four Bronze statues that represent warriors famous in their time.

These are just some of the things you can see in the Jinci Temple, the attractions that are unique, but there are also other important things like the Boat Shaped Hall with the statue of a monk that is supposed to bring you luck in your studies, the well that has always bubbling water thanks to the underground currents, the pagoda shaped building and the temple of the Dragons, on a rock that you can go through trough a cave.

The Jinci Temple is one of the most important temples of ancient China so if you have the opportunity to make a detour in your China travel and you can spare a day in the Shanxi region make sure that you include the Jinci Temple, it’ll be a decision that you will not regret!

 

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