Enjoy and Embrace the Delicious taste of Jiaozi!!

On January 19, 2012, in Cool Places, Cultural Experience, Restaurants & Food, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

While you are enjoying your China Tour why not attempt to make some jiaozi (Chinese Dumplings). You can either take a cooking class in which ever city you are in or attempt to get the ingredients yourself and make them in your China hotel room.  Making jiaozi is a very popular tradition for the Chinese […]

While you are enjoying your China Tour why not attempt to make some jiaozi (Chinese Dumplings). You can either take a cooking class in which ever city you are in or attempt to get the ingredients yourself and make them in your China hotel room.  Making jiaozi is a very popular tradition for the Chinese especially in Northern China around the holidays with their families. There are many different ingredients you can use to make jiaozi, so it is up to you how you want it to taste.

 

The art of dumpling making can be dated back since the Sung Dynasty and has forever been tradition in the Chinese culture.  It is very traditional on New Year’s Eve (Spring Festival) for the whole family to get together and make jiaozi where every member is assigned to different tasks on the process of making them. The jiaozi is seen as a lucky food; reason being is because of the shape they are made to. It is made into a crescent shape which resembles good wealth due to the fact that they look similar to the traditional silver and gold ingots. In some family traditions, there is one dumpling which will have a coin in it and whoever gets that one will definitely have good wealth for the year.

 

In regards to making the dumplings, you can use whatever ingredients you like as your filler. There is a wide variety of dumplings; even some restaurants may offer you 25 different kinds on their menu. So you can either make it out of any kind of meat mince, seafood or vegetables. The vital part of the dumpling is the wrap; this is made out of flour and a little bit of water. Once you make the dough cut it into smaller pieces and create small flat circles. But keep in mind to make sure the middle of the circle is thicker than the rest; this will prevent it from splitting. Once you have done the dough make it into a small cup in your hands and put your filler in. The filler can consist of meat, vegetables, soy sauce, oil, garlic and ginger. It is entirely up to you. Once the filler is in fold it in half and pinch the top together creating a crescent shape. Make sure that you firmly squeeze the the sides together so it doesn’t burst open, if needed add extra bit of water and flour. Once that is done slightly curve the dumpling so it can sit by itself.

 

In regards to cooking jiaozi, place it in a boiling pot but however do add an extra cup of cold water. By adding cold water it will prevent the dumpling from bursting open due to the boiling water and keep stirring throughout. When the dumplings are floating at the top it means that they are ready to eat. It is a very easy, quick and enjoyable dish to make especially with people.

So if you are travelling to Beijing, Shanghai, Xi’an, Guangzhou, Guilin or any place in China find out if there are any cooking classes to attend or take up the challenge of making them yourself or with a Chinese family. If you are in China for Spring Festival, do not forget to make jiaozi on New Year’s Eve or order them at a restaurant. Enjoy and embrace the delicious tradition of jiaozi!!

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The People’s Money

On January 18, 2012, in Cool Places, Featured China Stories, Shopping, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

When booking your China Tour it is highly recommended that you exchange a small amount of money before you arrive into China. The Chinese Renminbi or RMB is known as ‘the people’s money’ and there are different ways of saying the currencies. You will hear people say Yuan which is said similar to ‘you-on’ or […]

When booking your China Tour it is highly recommended that you exchange a small amount of money before you arrive into China. The Chinese Renminbi or RMB is known as ‘the people’s money’ and there are different ways of saying the currencies. You will hear people say Yuan which is said similar to ‘you-on’ or you will hear Kaui and it is pronounced similar to ‘kwhy’. There are many different notes and coins which you need to get familiar with and need to be aware of the counterfeiting of the 100 and 50 Yuan. So while you are on your long China Flight, study your notes and coins so you can become familiar with them all.

 

On the foreign exchange bureaus China is known as CNY which is abbreviated for the Chinese Yuan. In regards to exchanging money if you are staying in a four or five star hotel they provide this service or if your hotel doesn’t, head to the Bank of China. Bank of China is one of the biggest banks and is located all over China especially in Beijing and they have all currencies within the branch. An important reminder, don’t forget to take your passport with you when exchanging money.

 

Since December 1948, five editions of the Chinese Yuan have been released; the final edition was released in October 1999. In regards to your notes there is 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100. With the coins there is 0.1, 0.5 and 1. The 1 Yuan comes in a note and in a coin form, the 1 Yuan coin is the largest silver coin. In relations to 0.1 and 0.5 they are called Jiao or known as Mao and they both come in note and coin forms, the 0.5 is a gold coin and the 0.1 is a small silver coin. In their note forms they are a smaller size compared to the Yuan.

 

 

Like in many countries, counterfeit currency is common in China. It is mainly the bigger notes which are targeted so either the 50 or 100 Yuan. There are many ways to determine if you have received a counterfeit note or not. On the back of all notes there will be what they call as a security line, this looks like silver shiny sections going down in a straight line in the middle of the note. On the front of the note there will be a water mark on the left side of the note, this was released in the fifth edition and when it is moved back and forth you will be able to see Mao Zedong. Also when you move the note back and forth the denominator ID on the left side will change colour. Therefore the 100 will change from green to blue and the 50 will change from gold to green. You can also determine if the note is real or not by touching Mao Zedong’s collar, it should feel bumpy along with the curve pattern on the edge of the right side it should also feel bumpy. It is quite easy to detect, it is also very common if a clerk will check your note before putting it away. However if you stumble across a fake note unfortunately there is not much you can do with it and the banks will not exchange it for a real one. The only time you can swap it back is if you received it at the bank and you checked the note before you left the premises.

 

So when you arrive in China and tour this wonderful country you will now have a better understanding of the different types of notes and coins you will come across. Also by being aware of the potential risk of coming across a counterfeit 50 or 100 Yuan will definitely
reassure you when you experience the great shopping the Chinese have to offer.

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God’s Ancient Playground

Lhasa, the ancient capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, covers an area of more than 544 square kilometers; its location, weather, spiritual and ancient history have given rise to numerous nicknames such as “the City of Sunshine” and “the Land of Gods”.  Its remote location and high altitude (3,650meters) presents a wild and untamed beauty, […]

Lhasa, the ancient capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, covers an area of more than 544 square kilometers; its location, weather, spiritual and ancient history have given rise to numerous nicknames such as “the City of Sunshine” and “the Land of Gods”.  Its remote location and high altitude (3,650meters) presents a wild and untamed beauty, which captivates the imagination and annually attracts adventurous individuals from around the world. Lhasa is filled with opportunities and scenic attractions; its role as the center of Tibet’s political, economics, religious and cultural activities fill the city with an energetic atmosphere. China Travel and China Tours currently offer a variety of tour specials to explore the ‘God’s Ancient Playground’ including a 13 day Everest Base Camp Trek and an 8 day Tibet Train adventure.

Lhasa’s powerful and majestic Potala Palace is a world renowned symbol of mysterious authority. Furthermore Lhasa is the regions religious, philosophical and political center point. Prior to the mid- seventh century the region now known as Lhasa was known as Wotang.  During this time the leader of the Tubo tribe, Songtsan Gampo  relocated his kingdom in the sheer gap between the two mountainsides. It is believed that Songtsan Gampo built the magnificent kingdom for his intended bride Wen Chen Konjo (Princess Wencheng of the Tang dynasty).   The imposing structure was a powerful symbol of the kingdoms strength and wealth, which was to intimidate any potential rivals.

However the kingdom was burnt to the ground during a brutal war and only partial structures survived. The kingdom was again rebuilt in the 17th century by the fifth Dalai Lama. Further repairs and expansion programs continued throughout the next three centuries until 1645, when the kingdom was finally completed. The magnificent kingdom soon became known as the home of the successive Dalai Lamas, and developed an environment of religious harmony.

The Tibetan Autonomous Region has an assortment of historic sights, ancient relics and magnificent palaces, monasteries and temples. Any journey to this region will turn into an adventure through time, as the enchanting ancient atmosphere and the astonishing selection of natural beauty inspire even the weariest traveler.

Whether you’re on a tour or exploring the region on mountain bikes, the area’s amazing ancient history will have you taking more photos than a paparazzo on the red carpet. Any visit to Tibet must include a few of the area’s most historic sites such as the; Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, Drepung Monastery, Sera Monastery, Gandan Monastery, local markets and villages. Air China has a variety of New Year Specials on sale to fulfill your every desire, visit the website today to begin your journey to one of the world’s most amazing sights!

 

Snow Much Fun!!

On January 17, 2012, in Activities, Adventure Trip, Cool Places, Must-sees, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

If you want to escape the busy sounds and bright lights of Beijing and want to enjoy the outdoors for a long weekend or just for the day one should definitely head to the ski slopes. Especially if you are visiting in the winter, experiencing the snow is a must on your China Tour. The […]

If you want to escape the busy sounds and bright lights of Beijing and want to enjoy the outdoors for a long weekend or just for the day one should definitely head to the ski slopes. Especially if you are visiting in the winter, experiencing the snow is a must on your China Tour. The recommended places which you should check out are Nanshan Ski Village, Duolemeidi Resort and Wanlong Resort. These places are advisable if you just want to add these activities to your Beijing Tour.

 

Firstly if you just want to spend a day or overnight in the snow, Nanshan Ski Village is the best way to go. From Beijing it is located roughly 62 kilometres away which will just take little over an hour to get to Nanshan, you can either hire a car or get a shuttle bus to take you to the Village. Based in the Miyun County, Nanshan provides different activities for all four seasons. Of course skiing is in the winter, hiking in the spring, and swimming in the summer and fruit-picking in autumn, these are just the few recommended activities which can be done throughout the year.  This place always attracts visitors all year round due to its exquisite sight-seeing. In regards to the snow, Nanshan has 12 trails up for offer ranging from advanced to beginners and even the people who do not want to ski can still enjoy their time in the snow. There are also restaurants, coffee places and bars which are located in this area.

 

If you want to spend a weekend or a little bit longer in the snow you can head to the Chongli Village where both Duolemeidi Resort and Wanlong Resort is located. However from Beijing, travel time will be close to 4 hours and there are quite a few options to get to Chongli Village. First option is that you can catch a train which leaves from Beijing and arrives at Zhangjiakou and then for the extra 50km you can catch a taxi. The taxi is quite reasonable considering the distance, then once you have arrived at Chongli there are shuttle buses which takes you to the resort. Alternatively you can hire a van and drive along the highway to the Chongli but it just depends how confident you feel about driving through Beijing traffic.

 

Chongli Village is located in the Heibi province and there are not many foreigners here so you will be able to see more of the traditional China compared to Beijing. Duolemeidi Resort is quite modern and has great long slopes which should be tried out via the five chair lifts provided. It has great elevation and always has excellent snow making conditions and they provide a rental service which is reasonably priced. Also if you want a change of scenery there is a shuttle bus which can take you to Wanlong Resort.

 

Wanlong Resort is the recommended ski resort if you want to stay for quite a few nights. It has a three star hotel which provides all necessary facilities and dining requirements of either Chinese or Western food. Wanlong has the largest ski mountain in China which has a huge variety of slopes. There are six different chair lifts which takes you to different parts of the mountain. From the top of the mountain there are 7 distinct trails which then branches off to 11 more trails and recently 6 more trails have been added. So there are definitely a lot of slopes for you to discover.

 

So get away from Beijing and experience a Winter Wonderland. Depending on the length of your trip in Beijing there are different areas which are available and whether you are an advanced skier or someone like me who hardly ever sees snow and wants to make a snow angel, these recommendations is a must before you board that China flight home.

 

Monkey Magic!

On January 16, 2012, in Adventure Trip, Cultural Experience, Tours, Transportation, by Jack Li

China’s most popular and widely known legend the beloved superhero, the Monkey King (Sūn Wùkōng) has been fondly retold through the centuries in many different forms. Countless adaptations have been made of the ancient Chinese tale, reinforcing traditional and cultural beliefs, while entertaining both the young and the old.  Growing up in the west, the […]

China’s most popular and widely known legend the beloved superhero, the Monkey King (Sūn Wùkōng) has been fondly retold through the centuries in many different forms. Countless adaptations have been made of the ancient Chinese tale, reinforcing traditional and cultural beliefs, while entertaining both the young and the old.  Growing up in the west, the ancient tale was retold in the 30 minute long Japanese Kungfu television series ‘Monkey Magic’, which was based on the Classic Sixteenth Century Chinese novel ‘Journey to the West” by Wu Cheng’en.  The television show broadcasted Monkey Magic’s many escapades, while it entertained millions and acquired a long lasting cult following. China flights and China Travel have an selection of specials on offer, which will introduce you to the cultural traditions and beautiful scenery which made Monkey Magic’s adventures so enchanting.

Monkey bought ancient tales of traditional Chinese cultural beliefs to life, with his mischievous personality and amazing array of skills and super strength he was loved by many. Monkey’s ‘Journey to the West’ (India) was filled with Chinese fables, legends and superstitions. Monkey and his companions Zhū Bājiè (Pigsy) Shā Wùjìng (Sandy) and Yùlóng Sāntàizi (Yu Long) battled with demons, dragons, Spirits, vampires, witches—and occasionally even the gods. The talking animals, magical feats and flying clouds, all culminated with Monkeys Magical kungfu skills, which bought China to life for millions of viewers around the world.

Monkey’s epic ‘Journey West’ displayed some of China’s most picturesque and beautiful scenery, captivating audiences across the world. As a child, watching the 1970’s dubbed ‘Monkey Magic’ tale was fascinating; Monkey’s mad skills, props and his cheeky ability to create havoc in Heaven and Earth was mesmerizing.  The shows cheesy dialogue, crazy disco music and impressive battle scenes entertained millions.

The popularity of the legend behind the Monkey King tale has led to constant television and movie remakes, including a 3D cartoon as well as a 3D and IMAX version which stars internationally acclaimed artists Donnie Yen and Chow Yun Fat. For me, watching the hilarious adventurous tales of Monkey’s journey west, contributed to a deep-seated desire to explore China. In Monkey Magic’s world anything is possible! If you also would like to follow in Monkeys footsteps visit China Travel to find more information about tour destinations and specials.

 

Would this excite your taste buds?

Before you take that China flight back home there is one stop everyone has to visit in Beijing. If you want to be adventurous with your foods and see how your taste buds and stomach can handle a different perspective, head down to Wangfujing Street. This street is very well known when it comes to […]

Before you take that China flight back home there is one stop everyone has to visit in Beijing. If you want to be adventurous with your foods and see how your taste buds and stomach can handle a different perspective, head down to Wangfujing Street. This street is very well known when it comes to different foods that the Chinese people eat and cook. It is also very easy to access, the subway is the best way to go just get off on Line 1 at Wangfujing Station, exit A.  So if you want to experience a true cultural difference than compared to your Western foods, Wangfujing Street is a must for your Beijing Tour.

 


Wangfujing Street itself is a major shopping district, with many department stores and centres, souvenir stalls and has the largest bookstore in Beijing which also has a foreign selection. This upbeat area of Beijing is exciting with music and bright lights everywhere, one would definitely be very entertained and fascinated by everything that is on show. However your main destination is the Wangfujing Snack Street (Wangfujing XiaoChiJie) it is in a side alley of the main shopping area and it doesn’t pick up until 6pm. There are stalls either side of the alleyway packed with different cuisines, Chinese souvenirs and mini marts.

 

Now not everyone will be gamed enough to try some of these foods but there are foods which can be eaten by all without freaking out the taste buds. They consist of different styles of dumplings, kebabs, spices, different types of desserts and toffee covered fruits. It is highly recommended that you at least try these foods. However, it is also very entertaining witnessing someone who is game enough to try out the ‘different’ cuisine. The adventurous eater may want to try scorpions (either have a large one or three little ones), bugs, centipedes, star fish, snakes, spiders, silk worms, mutton testicles and many more. Majority of these are placed on a stick similar to a kebab. A recent review by some people in regards to the smaller scorpions on a stick is that it tastes similar to pork crackling but there were some people who disagreed with this observation, guess it is up to that person and their taste buds. It is recommended to have a beverage with you just in case you have underestimated the taste.

 

Whilst enjoying this cuisine, you can also check out the stalls. Majority of these stalls are full with Chinese souvenirs for example many silk products, key rings and figurines, as well as scarves and purses. But be warned as being a tourist they will definitely start at an interesting, ridiculous price, so be prepared to haggle with them so at the end you get a good bargain for the item. However this can only be done at the street stalls, not at the department stores and shopping markets.

 

This area is very central to everything, with many hotels in this district. This entire street has a lot to offer and one can truly spend majority of the day here. Wangfujing Street is probably one of the only pedestrian streets in Beijing, it is said that it can take about 30 minutes to walk from either end and that is without looking inside the shops. Within your Beijing trip, Wangfujing Snack Street cannot be neglected at all. The foods are famously known around the world and this is the street to get it. So definitely bring your camera or even a video camera to get shots of these foods to impress people at home and also the reactions on people’s faces when they first eat this interesting cuisine.

Freaky Friday

On January 13, 2012, in Beijing, Nightlife, Nightlife, by Jack Li

The origins of Black Friday date far back to the September 24, 1864 stock market disaster which saw gold prices plummet.  The term was re-appropriated in the late 1960s by a number of Newspapers in Philadelphia to describe the Friday following Thanksgiving Day, which is usually filled with consumer mayhem. Some believe the term was […]

The origins of Black Friday date far back to the September 24, 1864 stock market disaster which saw gold prices plummet.  The term was re-appropriated in the late 1960s by a number of Newspapers in Philadelphia to describe the Friday following Thanksgiving Day, which is usually filled with consumer mayhem. Some believe the term was introduced to describe the escalated levels of consumerism in the city’s shops, as the merchants’ increased sales sent the stores books from the red into the black. The term has since then been utilized by the Philadelphia Police department to describe the bedlam which engulfed the city, as large traffic jams and crowds brought the city to a standstill.

As the popularity of the ‘Black Friday’ superstition grew people began to associate the day with something unpleasant or simple bad luck.  However this Black Friday Beijing will come alive as a number of pubs and clubs offer a whimsical and spooky salute to the dark-side. To experience the festivities visit Air China and Beijing Tours, and let the variety of specials on offer brighten any Black Friday feelings of doom and gloom.

If you’re feeling down and out today wonder down to The Green Cap Bar and let the luck of the Irish transform your night.  The Green Cap Bar has joined forces with the Filling Station to host a Spooky Costume Party, with profits going to the wonderful charity ‘Roundabout’. To join in this amazing party head down to The Green Cap Bar-Laiguangying Donglu, Chaoyang District and get your spook on!

If this doesn’t tickle your fancy and you’re looking for something a little more devilish, proceed to the Temple Bar, which will be filled with violent metal tunes, bloody drinks, and hard core metal heads.  With a wide range of metal inspirations ranging from Sabbath, Slayer, Maiden, Motorhead, and Judas Priest, the Temple Bar is not for the faint hearted!

Beijing’s after-dark scene has a vast array of Pubs and Clubs filled with explosive energy, endless possibilities and great music to satisfy even the finickiest visitors. For serious clubbers head to the White Rabbit, the sparsely decorated underground club offers some of the hottest tunes in the city guaranteed to ensnare your attention and have you gyrating till the early hours. This Friday night the Dao Club in Xizhimen, is hosting a “Pure Black” Drum & Bass and Dubstep bash to mark Friday the 13th where anything goes!

The night’s possibilities will ease the post-Christmas & New Year’s carousing and will prepare you for the new 2012 Spring Festival celebrations.  Visit Beijing Flights and join the revelry which sets the nation’s capital apart from the rest of the country. This Friday night get your dancing shoes on and head out into Beijing’s realm of endless possibilities and make it a night to remember!

 

 

 

 

An Underground Adventure

On January 13, 2012, in Beijing, Cultural Experience, Getting Around, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

Beijing is a very busy city; it is one of the few cities that never sleep. Therefore no matter what time of day it is, there is always traffic. In your travels within Beijing the best way to get around is via the subway lines, you can also organise and take the train from the […]

Beijing is a very busy city; it is one of the few cities that never sleep. Therefore no matter what time of day it is, there is always traffic. In your travels within Beijing the best way to get around is via the subway lines, you can also organise and take the train from the airport when your China flight has arrived. If you need to get somewhere in a certain time avoid taking a taxi or bus and go underground to experience the subway. However the subways are always hectic as well, so this will outline what to expect and how to survive your subway adventure whilst having a great time touring Beijing.

 

Firstly forget your personal space, in the subways they do not exist at all and they are long gone. Being pushed and squeezed on to the train is always an eventful experience, just try not to get your jacket caught in the door or end up missing a shoe. It feels as though everyone is late for something important so everyone wants to get on this one particular train, so the race is on. However words of advice do not get angry or upset if you do get pushed into the train or that you are underneath someone’s arm pit, it will get you nowhere further in your travels and you are not a victim in this ordeal. Secondly do not hesitate at all, if your mission is to get on that train, go straight for it. Because if you hesitate for a slight second you will never get to your destination and people behind you will go straight pass you. But don’t fret to much, trains come every couple of minutes. So put your game face on and do it how the locals do it.

 

 

The best way to surviveyour trip is to know where you are going before you get on the train. There are many maps throughout the stations as well as online, so study your route before you head to the subway. The reason being is because no one is going to wait for you to work out where you need to go and which station you need to get off at. Everyone prepares themselves to get off the train the stop before and if you are not ready you will get charged at by the people wanting to get on the train. If you do plan your trip and familiarise yourself with the station names and exits, no matter how crazy busy the subway is your trip will be successful and will run smoothly. Within majority of the trains there are maps on top of the door highlighting which stations have already been passed and which is coming up next, so you cannot get lost.


All the major tourist destinations within Beijing are next to or a short walk from a subway station. Therefore the subway is the most desirable transportation to go with. You will usually find that the maps and the voice overs on the train will say which stop to get off in order to go to the attraction. The major shopping markets are near subway stations, Tiananmen Square and the Forbidden City is right above a subway station and majority of museums and galleries are a short distance from the subways.

Even though the subway sounds very hectic, which it can be, it is the most efficient, quickest and cheapest (2RMB per trip) way to travel around in Beijing. Also you cannot go to Beijing and not experience the subway, just do it with a positive attitude and have a laugh when you get shoved in or out of a train. It is its own little adventure in itself and is a must do in your tour of China.

Fancy Fuzhou

On January 12, 2012, in China Travel Gossip, Cultural Experience, Modern Architecture, Temples, by Jack Li

After years of economic reform China has emerged as one of the most important countries for Foreign Direct Investment. As a direct result of the 1978 ‘Open Door’ government policies’, economic growth in China has rapidly escalated.  Moreover since the early 1990s China has been the world’s largest recipient of Foreign Direct Investment among all […]

After years of economic reform China has emerged as one of the most important countries for Foreign Direct Investment. As a direct result of the 1978 ‘Open Door’ government policies’, economic growth in China has rapidly escalated.  Moreover since the early 1990s China has been the world’s largest recipient of Foreign Direct Investment among all developing countries.  The establishment of Special Economic Zones along the east coast of China combined with the new Joint Venture Laws effectively liberalized the new Chinese Market Economy.

Located on the east coast of China, Fuzhou, the capital of Fujian Province was greatly affected by the new open door policy. Fujian was granted a Special Economic Status during the reforms, which saw a rapid escalation of Joint Ventures and Foreign Direct Investment flowing into the city.

As a direct result of the opening up of China to western influences, travelers from around the globe flocked to the ancient eastern power. China Tours and Air China are currently offering a number of great specials to this amazing city.

Today Fuzhou has strong economic exchanges with Southeast Asia, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao, Europe and North America. Initial trade focused on labor intensive industries, textiles, plastics and footwear; however recent expansions now include trade areas such as electronics, technology and automobile manufacturing. As a result of the strong economic growth over the past twenty plus years, Fuzhou city has emerged as a prosperous and exciting tourist destination.

The amalgamation of cultural traditions and an ancient history with new entrepreneurial enterprises and contemporary lifestyles has produced a captivating city on the move. Traditional historic sites are combined with man-made natural parks and gardens to provide this exciting city with a charged environment. The vast array of ancient temples, tombs, towers and bridges illustrate the city’s long and convoluted history.

For the best view of the city’s urban growth head to Mt. Gu (Drum Hill) in the eastern suburbs of Fuzhou, approximately 17km from the City Center. Mt Gu is located on the banks of the Min River, so it’s a great place to escape form the oppressive summer heat while exploring some of the areas greatest National Parks, Buddhist temples, and towers such as Wu Tower.

Other mountains located within the city’s limits include the famous Mt. Yu, which has a corresponding White Tower facing Mt. Gu. Continuing north of the city to Hubin Lu, you will find the illustrious West Lake Park, named after the famous West Lake in Hangzhou.

 

Throughout history the park developed a reputation of legendary beauty which attracted visitors from around the globe. No visit to Fujian province is complete without a journey to the renowned Wuyi Mt. which was listed by UNESCO as one of the world most important natural beauties and cultural heritages. Furthermore Wuyi is considered by many as being one of the greatest scenic sensations of southern China, for more information on the idyllic location head to China Travel.

 

Lhasa- ‘Place of the Gods’

On January 12, 2012, in Cultural Experience, Festivals, Lhasa, Tibet, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Lhasa is the capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, west of the mainland. It is known to be one of the highest cities in the world, with the altitude measuring up to 3,490 metres. Lhasa is also known as the ‘Place of the Gods’ this is because it is known as the centre of the […]

Lhasa is the capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, west
of the mainland. It is known to be one of the highest cities in the world, with the altitude measuring up to 3,490 metres. Lhasa is also known as the ‘Place of the Gods’ this is because it is known as the centre of the Buddhist beliefs and spirituality. Located within the Himalaya Mountains, Lhasa is made up of seven counties. There are many sights and temples to see in Lhasa and there are great package deals going through China Tours.

 

For a foreigner whom is not a Chinese national will have to gain a special permit from the Chinese government in order to visit Tibet and they are strictly advised to have a tour guide with them at all times. Tibet Tours provides tour guides for people who want to visit Lhasa and will easily be able to advise on setting up a permit. They offer a religious and spiritual tour or a hiking and trekking tour, with the glorious scenery you cannot go wrong with either tour. Apart from the exquisite view this area has to offer there are three locations which is a must when visiting Lhasa. They are the Potola Palace, Norbulingka and Jokhang Temple. All these places are very accessible; you can either take a shuttle or go for a brief walk. The Potola Palace which is the most famous was of course the chief residence of the Dalai Lama before he fled to India in the 1950’s. It was first constructed in 1645 but since the 14th Dalai Lama was exiled the government have done reconstructions in 1989 through to 1994. It is the most popular tourist attraction in Tibet as it is so enriched with history, religion and culture that it should definitely not be ignored from your list of sites. Also to keep in mind photography within the Temple is forbidden, so just restrain yourself until you get outside.

 

Norbulingka is considered to be one of the biggest man made
gardens in China, taking up an area of 36 hectares. This garden is approximately 1 kilometre south-west of the Potala Palace and was known as the summer residence for the Dalai Lama. It is recommended to go in the July/August period when the Sho Dun Festival or ‘the yogurt festival’ in on. It is a great festival to experience, there is a lot of music, dancing and food. You will be able to experience the Tibetan culture first hand.

 

 

Jokhang Temple is a must; it is seen to be one of the most sacred temples in Tibet. The architecture of this temple is amazing, with beautiful gilded bronze tiles on the roof tops. The temple was constructed in the 7th century AD as a house of statues for the Buddha. Along with the Patola Palace, this temple is very popular among tourists. In the year 2000 the Jokhang Temple was added to the World Heritage List, Norbulingka was added in 2001 and the Potola Palace has been on the list since 1994.

 

If you love history, Lhasa is the place to go for your tour of China. It is so enriched with the Buddhist beliefs and culture that it would be an experience of a life time to see it all first hand. Lhasa is very accessible from the larger cities in China, it can be accessed either by a
train if you want to have the scenic route or you can choose to fly. It is advised to check out both options and see what else you can put into your itinerary. However Tibet flights are always the best way to go if Lhasa is the only destination you have in mind.

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