The Chinese Tea

On March 11, 2011, in Adventure Trip, China Travel Gossip, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

In the history of china, tea takes a very high position. So in your china travel, you must savour the Chinese tea. The Chinese have a saying: ‘Firewood, rice, oil, salt, sauce, vinegar and tea are the seven necessities to begin a day.’ China is the homeland of tea. It is believed that China has tea-shrubs as early as five to six thousand years ago, and human cultivation of teaplants dates back two thousand years. Tea from China, along with her silk and porcelain, began to be known the world over more than a thousand years ago.

The Categories of Tea

The Top Ten Tea

Advantages of Tea-Drinking

Tea has been one of the daily necessities in China since time immemorial. Countless numbers of people like to have their aftermeal cup of tea.

In summer or warm climate, tea seems to dispel the heat and bring on instant cool together with a feeling of relaxation.

Medically, the tea leaf contains a number of chemicals, of which 20-30% is tannic acid, known for its anti-inflammatory and germicidal properties. It also contains an alkaloid (5%, mainly caffeine), a stimulant for the nerve centre and the process of metabolism. Tea with the aromatics in it may help resolve meat and fat and thus promote digestion. A popular proverb among them says, “Rather go without salt for three days than without tea for a single day.”

Tea is also rich in various vitamins and for smokers, it helps to discharge nicotine out of the system. After wining, strong tea may prove to be a sobering pick-me-up.

The above, however, does not go to say that the stronger the tea, the more advantages it will yield. Too much tannic acid will affect the secretion of the gastric juice, irritate the membrane of the stomach and cause indigestion or constipation. Strong tea taken just before bedtime will give rise to occasional insomnia. Constant drinking of over-strong tea may induce heart and blood-pressure disorders in some people, reduce the milk of a breast-feeding mother, and put a brown colour on the teeth of young people. But it is not difficult to ward off these undesirable effects: just don’t make your tea too strong.

So that’s the Chinese tea, are you know it? I believe the Chinese tea culture tour will give you a deep impression. You will enjoy your China Tours.

Jack Li
Tagged with:  

3 Responses to “The Chinese Tea”

  1. k says:

    beautiful pictures of tea plant

  2. Alex Song says:

    I will try my best to satisfy your attention. Can you tell me what you are interested in?

  3. k says:

    everything about tea.thanks

Leave a Reply

 

Page 1 of 11