Best China’s Airports Earn Unraveled Flight Experience

On March 16, 2011, in Cool Places, Cultural Experience, by Jack Li

According to the 2010 report released by Airports Council International, Asian airports occupied all of the seats of world’s five best airports, among which Beijing Capital International Airport ranked the fourth place and Shanghai Pudong International Airport fifth. This shows China, initiated by the major airline hubs, has developed a very sophisticated air flight system […]

According to the 2010 report released by Airports Council International, Asian airports occupied all of the seats of world’s five best airports, among which Beijing Capital International Airport ranked the fourth place and Shanghai Pudong International Airport fifth. This shows China, initiated by the major airline hubs, has developed a very sophisticated air flight system in terms of either domestic travels or international connections. Three of the China’s leading airports, shown as below, ensure pleasures of China Flights on your China Tours

Beijing Capital International Airport is the principal airport of Beijing and the busiest civilian airport in China, and meanwhile, the headquarter of Air China. It once replaced Tokyo Haneda Airport as the busiest airport in Asian and listed among the four busiest airports in Asia, together with Hong Kong, Bangkok and Tokyo in 2004. The same year, the third terminal building started to be built and opened into use before Beijing 2008 Olympics after four years’ construction. It is the largest independent terminal building, as large as 170 soccer fields. Since then, Beijing Capital Airport became the first one nationwide with three terminal buildings, two control towers and three aerodrome runways in service coinstantaneously.

Beijing Capital International Airport is an important portal of entry for foreign exchanges, being the center of network of China Civil Aviation. At present, it has 98 domestic flights to 91 cities of the country and 101 international flights to 76 cities outside China. Compared with this crucial transportation hub in Northeast Asia, the other airport in Beijing, Nanyuan Airport is small. It is for both military and civilian use. There are domestic flights only, heading for some major cities like Hangzhou, Guangzhou, Haikou, Sanya, Chongqing, Changsha and some smaller place, such as Foshan, Linyi, Fuyang, Ordos, Baotou, Quzhou, Yulin, Lianyungang, Changzhou, Hailar and Manchuria.

There are two international airports in one city. This fact makes Shanghai outstanding as the largest city in China. Pudong International Airport play more important role. At present, it has three runways, two terminal buildings, 218 gate positions and 70 boarding walkways. It is affordable an annual passenger throughput of 60 million. There are averagely 700 flights of departure or arrival in one day, making up some 60 percent of Shanghai airports’ total flights amount. It includes the direct flights to New York by US Continental Airlines, Mexico by Mexicana Airlines, Zurich by Swiss International Airlines and Atlanta by Delta Airlines. Over 60 Chinese and overseas airlines set up business here. The flight network covers over 90 cities and regions outside China and more than 70 domestic cities.

15 airlines have scheduled flights to Hongqiao Airport, among which China Eastern Airlines, Shanghai Airlines and Spring Airlines are headquartered at this airport. It connects Shanghai with more than 60 cities in China and chartered flights to two cities in Japan and South Korea.

At the joint area of Renhe Town in Baiyun District and Xinhua Town in Huadu District, Guangzhou Baiyun Airport is about 28 kilometers from the central downtown of Guangzhou, Haizhu Square. It is one of the three air transportation hub in China. There are totally 123 scheduled flights, and 86 flights of them are domestic. Every day, there are more than five hundred flight taking off and landing. In the end of 2007, the annual passenger throughput in Guangzhou Airport reached 31 million, far beyond the expectation before the new airport was settled down in 2004. China Southern Airlines and Shenzhen Airlines choose the airport as their headquarters.

The airport is located in the center area of Asia-Pacific region. Major cities worldwide can be reached in 15 hours from Guangzhou. Its network covers South and Southeast Asian, being an important traffic hub to go to Vietnam, Laos, Burma, India, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. In addition, there are flights to Melbourne and Sydney of Australia, Paris, Los Angeles and Lagos of Nigerian, connecting flight to Amsterdam via Beijing and some flight to Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya of Japan, Seoul of Korea, etc. China Southern Airlines has most domestic and international flights here.

Guilin Tours: Li River Cruise

On March 15, 2011, in Cool Places, Featured China Stories, by Jack Li

I’ve always been deeply attracted by the picturesque natural scenery in China, so when planning my China Tours, I firstly chose Guilin Tours. Experiencing the romantic atmosphere, I appreciated the charming wonders in Li River. We boarded two pleasure boats at 8:30 a.m. for a spectacular five-hour cruise along the winding Li River. The boats […]

I’ve always been deeply attracted by the picturesque natural scenery in China, so when planning my China Tours, I firstly chose Guilin Tours. Experiencing the romantic atmosphere, I appreciated the charming wonders in Li River.

We boarded two pleasure boats at 8:30 a.m. for a spectacular five-hour cruise along the winding Li River. The boats travelled approximately 25 km down the 80 km river, and then turned back to dock at Yangdi, a small village at the foot of two mountains (said to resemble the horns of a sheep). Every boatload of tourists was met by hundreds of local peasants, all eager to profit by selling whatever they could to the foreigners. In the past, boats landed at Yangshuo, another small town, but because of the deteriorating condition of the road leading to Guilin, this return bus route had been discontinued.

Legend told us that every sailor drowned in the Li would transformed into a demon clutching at the boats which navigate the rapids. As the launch floated past villages, bamboo groves, and mist-shrouded crags, one had the sensation of being carried backwards in time through a traditional Chinese painting. Local river rafts are still physically towed upstream in convoys. A few are still towed by men and women in harness.

 

Along the way, famous rock formations came into view: Elephant Trunk Hill, just outside Guilin, suggests an elephant drinking from the river; Old Man Mountain resembles the head and neck of a man in profile; and the varicolored vines on the rock of Mural Hill, also known as Nine-horse Hill, resemble horses in different poses, one neighing, another bending to drink, a third lying down.

The boat passed through the Luogu Rapids, where the sound of the rushing water was something similar to gongs and drums. Further along loom Folded Brocade Hill, with its multicolored vegetation, and Crescent Moon Hill, whose summit contained a cave shaped like a half moon. The two hour bus ride back to Guilin from Yangdi provided a fleeting glimpse of typical Guangxi Country side.

Green hills, clear water, fantastic caves and spectacular rocks create a lovely and distinctly Chinese landscape, one instantly recognizable from  images on silk, porcelain and even the back of 20 Yuan RMB.

If you are also interested in travelling to Li River, you can just visit chinatraveldepot.com for more information about China Flights, Guilin Tours and Guilin Hotels, etc.

FAQ on traveling in China

On March 15, 2011, in Adventure Trip, Cultural Experience, Must-sees, by Jack Li

1. Where should I go on my first trip to China? It firstly dependents on how much time you have to arrange. Generally speaking, Beijing Tours, Shanghai Tours and Xi’an Tours are recommended for your first trip to China. Beijing is the political and cultural center of China, where you can visit a part of […]

1. Where should I go on my first trip to China?

It firstly dependents on how much time you have to arrange. Generally speaking, Beijing Tours, Shanghai Tours and Xi’an Tours are recommended for your first trip to China.

Beijing is the political and cultural center of China, where you can visit a part of the Great Wall—— the Badaling and the residential area of emperors of Qing and Ming Dynasties——the Imperial Palace as well as the Imperial Gardens——the Summer Palace and Beihai Park. You can also enjoy the flavors of roasted Beijing dark and instant-boiled mutton. Shanghai is the largest city of China. It is the best place for shopping. The full range of local delicacies, cookies, handicrafts and textiles will satisfy you. Suzhou and Hangzhou, a few hours’ drive from Shanghai, represent the Arts of Chinese Garden and are crowned as “paradise on earth”. The city of Xian was the starting point of the ancient Silk Road and was the capital of thirteen ancient dynasties. The newly unearthed Terracotta Warriors are recognized as “the eighth wonder of the world”. Great Wild Goose Pagoda and Drum Tower are left over from Tang Dynasty. You can also take a hot spring bath in Huangqing Pool, which used to be a private bath for Yang Guifei. Otherwise you can pay homage to the Tomb of Huangdi, not far from Xi’an, as a descendent of Emperor Yan and Huang. In Xi’an, you can enjoy the Tang style music and dance, and taste Tangish cuisine.

2. What is most worth buying in China and where to buy it?

Chinese handicrafts, silk, porcelain, carpets and cotton textiles have high reputation in the world. The price is more reasonable than other places in the world, and more choices are available in China. Each place in China has its own local specialties. For example, Beijing’s cloisonné and carpets, Shanghai’s Chinese clothing and cotton textiles, Hangzhou’s silk, Suzhou’s antiques and Xian’s terra cotta figures and three-color glazed pottery of the Tang Dynasty. If you don’t want to bother, you can buy these once for all in Beijing or Shanghai’s friendship stores. Friendship stores in big cities usually have plenty supply, and offer mail service. Visitors who are interested in art can also purchase paintings and antiques. But remember invoice and identification mark (a red wax seal) are needed to go through the Customs.

You can just visit chinatraveldepot.com or leave questions for more information, and we sincerely welcome you to China for your China Tours.

Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes

On March 14, 2011, in Beijing, Cool Places, Shanghai, by Jack Li

Attracted by China Buddhist culture, you may choose to Travel to Tibet when planning your China Tours. But you should also not miss the shining pearl on the Silk Road — Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes. Dunhuang, located in the desert corridor of northwestern Gansu Province, lies close to the east of Xinjiang and to the west […]

Attracted by China Buddhist culture, you may choose to Travel to Tibet when planning your China Tours. But you should also not miss the shining pearl on the Silk Road — Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes.

Dunhuang, located in the desert corridor of northwestern Gansu Province, lies close to the east of Xinjiang and to the west of Qilian mountain range. This is a 2,000-year old city and was an important resting place for merchants traveling along the Silk Road linking China with Central Asia. Today, this city attracts visitors for the most precious treasure of Buddhist Art known in the world — the Mogao Grottoes.  

    

The Mogao Grottoes, the most archaic Buddhist holy land, lies 25 kilometers southeast of Dunhuang in a river valley between the Sanwei Mountain and the Mingsha Mountain. According to a stone inscription of Tang Dynasty, the stone carvings there came into being in 360 AD, when a Buddhist monk named Yue Seng passed this place and saw a vision of thousands of golden Buddhas. Over the following 1,000 years, hundreds of caves were carved out of the steep sandstone cliffs in a layered honeycombs pattern and connected together by wooden walkways and ladders.    

    

Murals and statues      

The Mogao Grottoes’ 45,000 square meters of mural paitings and more than 2000 color statues are regarded as the greatest treasure-house of Buddhist art existing in the world. Those well preserved caves span a period of one thousand years, from the 4th to the 14th century, and visually present with vivid detail the culture of medieval China.      

    

    

 

Manuscripts and texts       

The Dunhuang hoard consisted of about 13,500 manuscripts, with printing and fragments included, of 19,200 items. It is the largest and most important group of oriental manuscripts ever found.       

Impressed writing exists in Dunhuang manuscripts from the early 5th to the 10th centuries and was a convenient method for Buddhist students to take note on their coples of a text during a lecture. Sometimes they wrote over these in ink after the lecture. The further discovery and study of such marks will help us to verify the pronunciation of classical Chinese and the method of Buddhist teaching.       

    

History

After the 14th century, the grottoes were abandoned. They were accidentally rediscovered in 1900 by a man called Wang Yuanlu who took refuge here while fleeing famine in Hubei Province. He stumbled upon the hidden monastery library, a priceless collection of scrolls, books, embroideries, paintings and scriptures left behind by monks living there and then driven by the army of the Western Xia in 1036. Lacking of interest by the corrupted government of Qing Dynasty, Wang sold those precious arts to British and French Sinologists case by case. Before 1949, this place had been continually plundered by warlords, local bureaucrats, officers and soldiers of KMT as well as western collectors.        

Dunhuang Mural in Britain

The desert and cliff on the upper side of the Grottoes are distinctive contrast to the lower green valley. But the valley still cannot protect the grottoes from being eroded by wind and rain. They are all severely damaged from inside and many have collapsed. Today, 492 grottoes are still standing. Each cave has a label attached to it, indicating its number, date and dynasty. The grottoes cover eight dynasties: the Northern and Western Wei Dynasty, the Sui Dynasty, the Tang Dynasty, the Five Dynasties, the Song Dynasty, the Western Xia Dynasty and the Yuan Dynasty.       

        

In 1987, UNESCO placed the Mogao Grottoes under the protection of the world cultural heritage list.      

If you are interested in such precious treasure and spectacular beauty, please book your China Flights and come to Dunhuang.

Huangshan Mountain

On March 14, 2011, in Cool Places, Tips & Ideas, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Once you think of China Travel, Beijing Tours might be the first to come in your mind, or you may consider of other modern cities such as Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. But after so much quick-fixed life, why not going out to enjoy some nature wonders? Then Huangshan Mountain will be a pleasant choice. Huangshan […]

Once you think of China Travel, Beijing Tours might be the first to come in your mind, or you may consider of other modern cities such as Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. But after so much quick-fixed life, why not going out to enjoy some nature wonders? Then Huangshan Mountain will be a pleasant choice.

Huangshan is the general name of a mountain range in southern Anhui province, well known throughout China for its extraordinary beauty. As the saying goes, no mountain is worthy seeing after a trip to Mt. Huangshan. It is located 1045 kilometers south of Beijing and 402 kilometers northwest of Shanghai, named by the emperor of Tang dynasty in the Tian Bao period (747 AD). The Huangshan mountain range covers an area of 150 square kilometers, and comprises over 70 peaks, of which the three tallest peaks are Lianhuafeng (Lotus Peak,1,864 m), Guangmingding (Bright Summit Peak, 1,840 m), and Tiandufeng (Celestial Peak, literally Capital of Heaven Peak , 1,829 m).

For hundreds of years, Chinese poets and painters have immortalized the four wonders of Huangshan, which are peculiarly-shaped stones, sea of cloud lingering around the peaks, ancient pines clinging to the cliffs, and world famous hot springs. Huangshan was, and still is, a preferred vacation destination for the Chinese and foreign guests.

On arrival of Huangshan, tourists are faced with thousands of stone steps on an 80-degree cliff. They should be warned that the pains and efforts to climbing those stone steps are as many as climbing the stairs of the Empire State Building. Depending on your stamina and tolerance for crowds, there are several ways to tackle HuangShan. Three cable car lines connect peaks also linked by well maintained trails. Most tourists choose taking tour buses to arrive at the mountainside along a winding mountain road, and then walk for three hours. That is an easy way to climb to the peak, with many pavilions and terraces half-way for the tourist to rest and enjoy watching near limpid pools and thundering waterfall. Those who reach the top can even have a truly memorable experience — walking into a living Chinese ink landscape painting.

It is damp and cold at the peak. Winter temperatures may fall to minus 18 degrees centigrade, and the average summer temperature is not more than 8 degrees centigrade. The best time to visit Huangshan is early spring or autumn, when the peaks are covered with fresh green plants or red defoliations. Most tourists are keen to view the sunrise at five in the morning, but it is rare to seeing the sun between the jagged peaks, which float in the sea of clouds like islands.

The famous Huangshan hot springs are located between ziyunfeng (Purple Cloud Peak) and Taohuafeng (Peach Blossom Peak) at 630 meters above sea level. The water stays at 42 degrees centigrade. Nearby are Wangpurting (Pavillion for watching Waterfalls) and Taoyuanting (Peach Source Pavillion).

Huangshan Mountain is destined to be one of the most visited tourist destinations in the 21st Century. If you are interested in such wonderful Chinese landscape, please book your China Flights and come to Huangshan.

Chinese Calligraphy– a Soul of Chinese Culture

On March 11, 2011, in Must-sees, Tips & Ideas, Travel Info, by Jack Li

Calligraphy is a greatly significant traditional art form in China. To experience the true Chinese culture on your China Tours, Chinese calligraphy allows you a deeper understanding of the beauty of China. It is not only a means of communication, but also a way of cultivating a person’s temperament  in an aesthetic sense. In ancient times it was essential a […]

Calligraphy is a greatly significant traditional art form in China. To experience the true Chinese culture on your China Tours, Chinese calligraphy allows you a deeper understanding of the beauty of China. It is not only a means of communication, but also a way of cultivating a person’s temperament  in an aesthetic sense. In ancient times it was essential a candidate could manifest his literary talent in the Imperial Examination, for it gave a first impression to the examiners. Children of high officials had to learn and try to write a good hand; even emperors themselves were good at calligraphy, for example, the versatile Emperor Qianlong in the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911) has left us many examples of his handwriting on steles in temples and palaces if you Travel to Beijing.

To practise calligraphy requires the basic tools of “four treasures of study” (writing brush, ink stick, paper, and ink slab) as well as much concentration on guiding the soft writing brush charged with fluid ink, and writing on the paper where the ink will diffuse quickly. Once the brush movement hesitates, a black mark is created, so speed, strength and agility is the essence of fine artwork. When writing, many calligraphers will forget all worries and even themselves, combining all thoughts in the beauty of their art.

Practice Calligraphy
Calligraphy, like a mirror, is a silent reflection of the soul. It is believed to have verve, of optimism, moderateness, or pessimism. Su Dongpo, one of the four litterateurs in the Song Dynasty (960–1279), composed many bold and unconstrained ci (a form of poetry that flourished in the Song Dynasty), also could write handsome characters in good taste. Today, although various modern ways have been substituted for the original calligraphy, especially which created with a writing brush, people still love the ancient form and practise it untiringly. During the traditional festivals, propitious couplets are always indispensable decorations each written in a beautiful style.

Four Treasures of the Study

Writing Brushes
The earliest writing brush that has been found is a relic of the Warring States Period (476 BC–221 BC). From that time onwards, the brush has evolved into many forms. The nib can be made from rabbit’s hair, wool, horsehair, weasel’s hair, or bristles, and so on; while the shaft may be made from bamboo, ivory, jade, crystal, gold, silver, porcelain, sandal, ox horn, etc. It is important to see that there can be both soft and hard brushes each producing their own particular styles.

Ink Stick
A good ink stick should be ground so as to be refined black with luster. With the invention of paper, they were improved accordingly. Since the Han Dynasty (206 BC–220), ink sticks have been made from pine soot, using other procedures that include mixing with glue, steaming and molding. In ancient times, emperors such Qianlong in the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911) had paid great attention to the production of ink sticks and were expert in their appreciation of quality inks.

Paper
Paper making is among the “four great inventions” and one of the greatest contributions that ancient Chinese people made to the world. Before the existence of paper, our ancestors utilized knots in cords to record events. They then carved on bone, ivory, tortoise shell and bronzes. For very many years they wrote on pieces of bamboo. There is a story that tells how Confucius was such an avid and diligent reader that he would wear away the strips of ox-leather used to bind the pages of bamboo books together. During the early Han Dynasty wealthy people would write upon white silk but this was beyond the reach of the majority as the cloth was so precious. It was Cai Lun who made the valuable contribution and his research gave rise to paper. Afterwards, many varieties of paper were produced of different quality and usage. Today the Xuan paper originally made in Anhui Province still shines with its charm.

Ink Slab
The ink slab is the reputed head of the “four treasures”, for its sobriety and elegance has endured the passage of time. Through ink slabs, people can sample the artistic charm of sculpting and the ink stone’s natural tints. Nearly all Chinese calligraphy enthusiasts hold that the star of ink slab is the Duanyan, ink slab produced in Duanzhou of Guangdong Province. It was always a tribute to the royal families during the Tang Dynasty (618–907).

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The Chinese Tea

On March 11, 2011, in Adventure Trip, China Travel Gossip, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

In the history of china, tea takes a very high position. So in your china travel, you must savour the Chinese tea. The Chinese have a saying: ‘Firewood, rice, oil, salt, sauce, vinegar and tea are the seven necessities to begin a day.’ China is the homeland of tea. It is believed that China has […]

In the history of china, tea takes a very high position. So in your china travel, you must savour the Chinese tea. The Chinese have a saying: ‘Firewood, rice, oil, salt, sauce, vinegar and tea are the seven necessities to begin a day.’ China is the homeland of tea. It is believed that China has tea-shrubs as early as five to six thousand years ago, and human cultivation of teaplants dates back two thousand years. Tea from China, along with her silk and porcelain, began to be known the world over more than a thousand years ago.

The Categories of Tea

The Top Ten Tea

Advantages of Tea-Drinking

Tea has been one of the daily necessities in China since time immemorial. Countless numbers of people like to have their aftermeal cup of tea.

In summer or warm climate, tea seems to dispel the heat and bring on instant cool together with a feeling of relaxation.

Medically, the tea leaf contains a number of chemicals, of which 20-30% is tannic acid, known for its anti-inflammatory and germicidal properties. It also contains an alkaloid (5%, mainly caffeine), a stimulant for the nerve centre and the process of metabolism. Tea with the aromatics in it may help resolve meat and fat and thus promote digestion. A popular proverb among them says, “Rather go without salt for three days than without tea for a single day.”

Tea is also rich in various vitamins and for smokers, it helps to discharge nicotine out of the system. After wining, strong tea may prove to be a sobering pick-me-up.

The above, however, does not go to say that the stronger the tea, the more advantages it will yield. Too much tannic acid will affect the secretion of the gastric juice, irritate the membrane of the stomach and cause indigestion or constipation. Strong tea taken just before bedtime will give rise to occasional insomnia. Constant drinking of over-strong tea may induce heart and blood-pressure disorders in some people, reduce the milk of a breast-feeding mother, and put a brown colour on the teeth of young people. But it is not difficult to ward off these undesirable effects: just don’t make your tea too strong.

So that’s the Chinese tea, are you know it? I believe the Chinese tea culture tour will give you a deep impression. You will enjoy your China Tours.

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The Chinese chopsticks

On March 10, 2011, in Beijing, Featured China Stories, by Jack Li

During your china travel, you may be interested in Great Wall, The Summer Palace, and The Forbidden City or the delicious food. But I guess you must be confused the chopsticks. Today we will talk about the chopsticks. When the Chinese began to use chopsticks as an eating instrument is anybody’s guess. They were first […]

During your china travel, you may be interested in Great Wall, The Summer Palace, and The Forbidden City or the delicious food. But I guess you must be confused the chopsticks. Today we will talk about the chopsticks. When the Chinese began to use chopsticks as an eating instrument is anybody’s guess. They were first mentioned in writing in Liji (The Book of rites), a work compiled some 2,000 years ago, but certainly they had their initial form in the twigs which the primitive Chinese must have used to pick up a roast after they began to use fire. The twigs then evolved into the wooden, tapering sticks as we know them today.

The correct way to use chopsticks is to hold the pair in the hollow between the thumb and forefinger of your fork hand. The one closest to your body should rest on the first joint of the ring finger and stay relatively immobile. Hold the other one with the forefinger and middle finger, which manipulate it like pincers to pick up the food. The strength applied by the fingers should vary with the things to be taken hold of. The skill to pick up, with speed and dexterity, small things like beans and peanuts and slippery things like slices of preserved eggs can only come from practice and coordinated action of the fingers.

Chopsticks may be made of any of several materials: bamboo, wood, gold, siler, ivory, pewter, and plastics. In cross-section, they may be either round or square. Some of them are engraved with coloured pictures or calligraphy for decoration. Ordinary chopsticks used in Chinese homes are of wood or bamboo; those for banquets are often ivory, whereas gold ones belonged only to the royalty and aristocracy.

Westerners are often impressed with the cleverness of the Chinese hand that makes embroideries and clay sculptures with such consummate skill.

And now for an interesting bit of culture trivia: a set of chopsticks is a common gift for newlyweds, because the Mandarin for chopsticks (筷子 “kuaizi”) is a homophone for “have a son soon” (快子).

So when you are using the chopsticks, you will appreciate the Chinese creation. I believe you will enjoy your China Tours.

How to Prepare for a Trip to China

On March 10, 2011, in China Travel Gossip, Cultural Experience, by Jack Li

Travel to China is an exciting adventure in itself. There are a lot of different things to think about before you go, and some things that you have to do before you even set foot in the airport from your China Flights. Visas are just one of the many things for which you’ll want to […]

Travel to China is an exciting adventure in itself. There are a lot of different things to think about before you go, and some things that you have to do before you even set foot in the airport from your China Flights. Visas are just one of the many things for which you’ll want to prepare. Read on to uncover more helpful preparation tips.

Passports and Visas

To enter the province of China a visa is required. Your passport must have a validity of at least six months and a full empty page for the stamp. Keep your passport safe at the time of application. Any foreign national travelling to Mainland China has to possess Chinese visa. You can deal in person with the embassy or consulate, or you can ask your travel agent to manage the process for you.

Once you plan your visit to China, inform the embassy about your trip. They will guide you and offer tips and suggestions for your safe travel. They will keep you updated about the rules and regulations of the country and the safety measurements.

Climatic Conditions

Study the place of your visit thoroughly before scheduling your trip. China has extreme weather conditions and crowded public places during the season. So plan accordingly if you are travelling with children and old people. Pack the clothes accordingly.

Money Matters

When starting traveling, the travelers’ check was the way to carry money around. Now with the prevalence of ATMs and credit cards, there are more convenient ways to make your purchases. Having a little advance notice of the denomination of the Chinese currency can also help you prepare for your trip.

Traveling with Small Children

The anticipation is probably worse than the reality of the trip. Traveling with children is stressful. But you can alleviate some of that stress by bringing what you need and buying the rest. Being prepared is most of the battle when you’ve got kids in tow, so make it easy on yourself. Knowing what kinds of activities are available for the little ones when they get bored with temples and monuments is also helpful.

Planning Your Itinerary

Now that you’ve got the mundane bits out of the way, it’s time to focus on planning your itinerary. Is it bright lights and big cities you’re into? Then you may want to start Shanghai Tours. Perhaps it’s China’s long history, best exemplified by the Great Wall you’re after exploring. Whatever you decide, you’ll exhaust your time for planning before you exhaust the possibilities. Enjoy!

Packing

The best advice I give my friends who come to China is this: pack light! There is so much shopping to do, most travelers have no problem filling up their suitcases on the way home. So don’t bring too much with you – you really don’t need that much. There are a few essentials you should have along with you. As the saying goes, if you don’t want it to rain, bring an umbrella. My theory is be prepared on the health front and bring along a first aid kit so you don’t have to worry about minor illnesses should they pop up. If you have it with you, hopefully you won’t need it.

One Clever Tip

Traveling in a foreign nation can be very exotic, fun and intimidating. This is particularly true if you don’t speak the language. It will be smart to bring a wallet size “survival language guide” – China travel guide in your wallet at all times. So you can at least express yourself in the emergency situation such as “where is the restroom”, “I am allergic to….”, “I need to see doctor…” etc.

There’s so much to see and do in China, you’ll want to focus on the good. But with any new country and culture, there might be some annoyances or irritations. Don’t let these get you down! Follow this simple primer to ensure you don’t ruin your China Tours.

The giant panda base

On March 9, 2011, in Other Regions, Tips & Ideas, by Jack Li

The spring is coming, now do youo have any programmes? Come to china travel! Great idea! You can come by China Flights, which now is pretty cheap. Do you care about the pandas? After the 5·12 earthquake in Wenchuan, the Wolong panda base was severely destroyed, so in order to protect the giant panda, the […]

The spring is coming, now do youo have any programmes? Come to china travel! Great idea! You can come by China Flights, which now is pretty cheap. Do you care about the pandas? After the 5·12 earthquake in Wenchuan, the Wolong panda base was severely destroyed, so in order to protect the giant panda, the chinese people transferm the giant panda to Bifengxia panda base. So now if you want to look at the lovely panda, you can go the Bifengxia panda base. Today we will talk about the Bifengxia panda base. Bifengxia is situated in 8 kilometers from Ya’an City, 150 kilometers from Chengdu. Tourists can reach here in two hours by bus. Before 2008 28 pandas were moved to the Bifengxia base, after erathquake on 12 May 2008, 53 pandas were sent from Wolong to Bifengxia, and between 12-05-2008 and 18-03-2009, 13 panda babies were born in Bifengxia.

Bifengxia base was opened in 2003 as the part of the world’s largest Giant Panda Migration. It was the biggest artificial migration of captive-bred giant panda ever seen. In the base, there are over 20 spots, such as breeding, research centre and special kindergarten, hotel for panda. In there 6 kind of bamboo as panda’s favorite food are supplied. Then pandas can have many choices.
Bifengxia Panda Base is arguably the best place to see pandas in the natural scenery they inhabit. Extending to about 60 square kilometres, Bifengxia has been long famous for its forest coverage, waterfalls, river and breathtaking landscapes. Now that it has been selected as China’s latest giant panda protection base, Bifengxia has a new role to play in altering the destiny of the endangered species. Pandas will be returned to nature after they have been given relevant training in simulated wild environments. In the dense broadleaf forest with singing birds and murmuring streams stands a big gate with the image of a lovely giant panda carved on it, marking the entrance to Bifengxia Giant Panda Base. Walking through the gate and along the meandering mountain slope for a while, visitors can see several European-style cabins made of bricks and tiles. These are the pandas’ homes. Camphor trees and oaks add mystery to the unusual environment. More than 20 spots have been set aside for panda-related activities and scientific experiments. There are dedicated grazing grounds, kindergartens for young pandas and even a panda hospital and research institute. Several different varieties of bamboo have been planted in the base either by the water or on the slopes. The new home for giant pandas appears like a park with a natural environment.

The 68 giant pandas in the base will be raised through an outdoor method so as to encourage them to develop abilities better fitted to the natural environment. The base will lead the world in raising pandas in this way. I believe you will enjoy your China Tours!

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